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Ignition options

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joesbox Avatar
joesbox Joe Mann
Oakham, Rutland, UK   GBR
When I last had my 1500 on the road I had electronic ignition. Optical type with an external box and a high output coil. This worked reliably on an otherwise standard engine.

When the restoration is done it will be reasonably tuned (ported head, MK3 cam, balanced etc.) so I'm wondering if it's worthwhile investing in something that has a programmable advance curve or is it possible to get good results with a basic electronic ignition and experimenting with advance springs? Either way I need a new dizzy as a starting point. What I don't spend on this will get spent elsewhere is how I see it.



Joe

www.joeblogs.eu

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TheZster Avatar
TheZster Steven Z
SAINT LOUIS, MO, USA   USA
1978 Triumph 1500 "BLK-BRY"
In reply to # 1533498 by joesbox When I last had my 1500 on the road I had electronic ignition. Optical type with an external box and a high output coil. This worked reliably on an otherwise standard engine.

When the restoration is done it will be reasonably tuned (ported head, MK3 cam, balanced etc.) so I'm wondering if it's worthwhile investing in something that has a programmable advance curve or is it possible to get good results with a basic electronic ignition and experimenting with advance springs? Either way I need a new dizzy as a starting point. What I don't spend on this will get spent elsewhere is how I see it.

Reasonably tuned?? I guess it depends on how you define that..... Programmable curves = $$ compared to stock type aftermarket types..... Experimenting with advance springs..... Why?? We all want our lil jewels to be all they can be.... but - at what point are you spending $$ just to spend $$...... Stock units will provide adequate/excellent performance - for the average street driver......(99.9% of us).... Chasing the "holy grail" of performance is extremely overrated....... (speed costs money - how fast do you want to go??)

I find it amusing that so many people ask how they can pick up another 1/4 horsepower..... when they drive their LBC's on weekends..... Know they can't compete stop light to stop light with anything modern.... The Joy of having a LBC is the handling, looks, and uniqueness of having something "different"....

(this from a guy with two heads in the shop right now being machined down for performance specs.. LOL)...

Z

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
There are guys that will set up a dizzy to work with your engine specs, I am sure other members will suggest names.

This may cost less than a 123 distributor or it's like.

Or you could just play with differant advance springs and advance settings on timed runs.

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joesbox Avatar
joesbox Joe Mann
Oakham, Rutland, UK   GBR
Well yeah, on one hand, why bother with any modifications? Run it all standard and just be happy with a standard car.

On the other, why stop at the ignition when you've already spent a fair bit of time and money in other areas?

The joy of having an LBC means different things to different people. For me, the reward is a personal thing. Nothing to do with racing people off the lights.

Having said that, maybe the money is better spent on a rolling road session and set up in the end?



Joe

www.joeblogs.eu

TheZster Avatar
TheZster Steven Z
SAINT LOUIS, MO, USA   USA
1978 Triumph 1500 "BLK-BRY"
In reply to # 1533538 by joesbox Well yeah, on one hand, why bother with any modifications? Run it all standard and just be happy with a standard car.

On the other, why stop at the ignition when you've already spent a fair bit of time and money in other areas?

The joy of having an LBC means different things to different people. For me, the reward is a personal thing. Nothing to do with racing people off the lights.

Having said that, maybe the money is better spent on a rolling road session and set up in the end?

I've gotta agree with Joe: "different things to different people"....... I don't mean to chastise folks for eeking out the last bit of HP they can..... I just wonder "why?". I'd rather spend my $$ on cosmetics once I have my infrastructure together doing a perfectly adequate job......

Once again: Chocolate/Vanilla.....

Z

joesbox Avatar
joesbox Joe Mann
Oakham, Rutland, UK   GBR
Yeah I'm certainly not one to squeeze every last HP out of it. No intentions of racing or anything. Just wondering if some investment in ignition is going to result in better driveability and/or make the most of the existing modifications. If the gains are negligible then I'll spend the money elsewhere.

Besides, being a software engineer by trade means I'm the kind of person that likes to have all the levers and knobs even if they don't really do a lot. 123 Ignition with bluetooth? Tempting! winking smiley



Joe

www.joeblogs.eu

lef2wander Avatar
lef2wander Gold Member James Thomas
Hatfield, MA, USA   USA
250£ for 123. When your all said and done on rolling road sessions, you may even exceed that.

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TheZster Avatar
TheZster Steven Z
SAINT LOUIS, MO, USA   USA
1978 Triumph 1500 "BLK-BRY"
In reply to # 1533549 by joesbox Yeah I'm certainly not one to squeeze every last HP out of it. No intentions of racing or anything. Just wondering if some investment in ignition is going to result in better driveability and/or make the most of the existing modifications. If the gains are negligible then I'll spend the money elsewhere.

Besides, being a software engineer by trade means I'm the kind of person that likes to have all the levers and knobs even if they don't really do a lot. 123 Ignition with bluetooth? Tempting! winking smiley

We are on the same page.... though " define: "driveability"..... How much time am I going to spend playing with a Bluetooth adjustability when I'm on the way to the grocery store? Jeeesh... Men and their toys... LOL...

Z

joesbox Avatar
joesbox Joe Mann
Oakham, Rutland, UK   GBR
Yeah not a lot let's be honest. Couple of goes setting the curve over bluetooth and that's about it.

The thought of making/programming my own ignition controller has entered my head...



Joe

www.joeblogs.eu

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1533504 by TheZster
In reply to # 1533498 by joesbox When I last had my 1500 on the road I had electronic ignition. Optical type with an external box and a high output coil. This worked reliably on an otherwise standard engine.

When the restoration is done it will be reasonably tuned (ported head, MK3 cam, balanced etc.) so I'm wondering if it's worthwhile investing in something that has a programmable advance curve or is it possible to get good results with a basic electronic ignition and experimenting with advance springs? Either way I need a new dizzy as a starting point. What I don't spend on this will get spent elsewhere is how I see it.

Reasonably tuned?? I guess it depends on how you define that..... Programmable curves = $$ compared to stock type aftermarket types..... Experimenting with advance springs..... Why?? We all want our lil jewels to be all they can be.... but - at what point are you spending $$ just to spend $$...... Stock units will provide adequate/excellent performance - for the average street driver......(99.9% of us).... Chasing the "holy grail" of performance is extremely overrated....... (speed costs money - how fast do you want to go??)

I find it amusing that so many people ask how they can pick up another 1/4 horsepower..... when they drive their LBC's on weekends..... Know they can't compete stop light to stop light with anything modern.... The Joy of having a LBC is the handling, looks, and uniqueness of having something "different"....

(this from a guy with two heads in the shop right now being machined down for performance specs.. LOL)...

Z

There is actually quite a lot of performance to be had from optimizing the advance curve.
Basically the old mechanical advance was absurdly conservative, the goal to prevent 'pinging' under every conceivable set of conditions.
That along with the inherent jitter, even when new, added to the added jitter from wear and age, represent a huge opportunity.
Even when I started racing in the mid 1960's it was well understood by serious racers that there was cheap power to be had.
A friend and fellow racer, Dana Barlow, had both a crank balancing machine and a distributor machine in his garage,
and made good side money balancing cranks and 'curving' distributors for the local racers.
The mechanical dizzys could still not be pushed as close to the limit like electronic ones can today, but 10% is still a healthy gain.

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