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Engine won’t stay running

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Triumph6100 Avatar
Triumph6100 Paul Henderson
Roscoe, IL, USA   USA
My 1980 Spitfire died while driving down the road a couple times and I managed to get it home and now it started for a few seconds but when I let off the gas, it died and wouldn’t start again. It usually runs alright if it’s idling over 2000 rpms but doesn’t like to idle. It ran perfectly fine before today. I checked the dashpot oil and it was right where it should be. I’m not exactly sure where to even start so any recommendations to start with would be awesome. Thank you all

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Outfect Avatar
Outfect Dave B
La Sal, UT, USA   USA
1940 Ford N Series Tractors "Henry"
1951 Other Not Listed "SnowMan"
1979 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "White October"
1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Tangerine Dream"
Paul,

First place to look would be the needle valve/fuel filter/float all of which maintain the fuel
level in the float bowl. A small speck of gunk in the needle valve goes along way to messing
up your day.

It also might be time for an overhaul. They were to be serviced at 12k & 25K miles.


DaveInUtah

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
Check the linkage on the throttle cable. Also the pedal end.

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tapkaJohnD Avatar
tapkaJohnD John Davies
Lancaster, Lancashire, UK   GBR
Two things needed to run and engine: fuel and spark.

Advice above good for the first, but check your ignition.
Two parts, low volage(12V) part, the contact breaker in the distributor, the coil and its supply, and high voltage, what comes out of the coil and goes to the plugs via the distributor.
Full instructions in your workshop manual.

A multimeter is useful for checking the first.
Weak points, the contact breaker points and the condensor that live in there (Tip: take out the condensor and test drive - they can break down and short circuit the points)

Weak points in High volts (that will cause what you suffer) rotor arm and the carbon button in the distributor cap that contacts it.

John

grubscrew Avatar
grubscrew grub screw
The suburbs of, Winfield, Maryland, USA   USA
Change the fuel filter first.



Dave
1970 Spitfire Mk3
FDU 78359L
34/11 (Jasmine yellow/Black interior)

1962 Triumph TR3B
TCF 575L
Signal Red/Red interior

Manana Avatar
Manana Steve Wten
Thornhill, ON, Canada   CAN
I'd say ignition.

But fuel filter is a good one, and easy to check/change. May also indicate if something made it past to your carb(s)

Even easier is centrifugal advance in the dizzy. If its binding in the advance position that would explain your symptoms.
Pull off the cap, twist the rotor and ensure it moves smoothly in one direction then smoothly springs back into its original place.

Then I'd follow John's train of thought.

Good luck with it.



Steve
http://stevew10.wix.com/spit16

carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
I'm thinking Paul has electronic distributor, so probably cap and rotor and timing. Paul, do you have a picture of your distributor with the cap off?



'S all for now
Vic

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
At my age I am not about to run out and get a tattoo, But if I did, it would not be some criptic 'Words of wisdom'
It would be something useful that I have kept forgetting time after time......

Check the ignition first stupid!

So many time a fuel problem turns out to be ignition. I would now have a lot more hair if I had not pulled bunches of it out looking for fuel delivery problems, when a simple spark tester would have shown I had a ignition problem.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
Every teenager goes for the carb first.

That's why they stopped making carbs.

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Triumph6100 Avatar
Triumph6100 Paul Henderson
Roscoe, IL, USA   USA
I do not. I will take it off and take a look at it soon. I found out that the clamp on the negative battery terminal is broken which prevents it from getting tight. I will start by replacing that. I filled the carb with dashpot oil and now when I take the air filter off, the piston is very tough to move up. Would this be an issue? And what would I do about that?

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
Do you have stock ignition?

brucejon Avatar
brucejon Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR3B
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
You should feel resistance, that is the purpose of the oil.

While odds are it is ignition, i would do a quick check on the fuel. Open the carb float chamber and see if it has fuel in it. If not likely there is your problem. If empty, pull the fuel line off the carb, disconnect the coil, and have a helper turn the engine over to see if you are getting fuel to the carb from the fuel pump. Point the fuel line into a container. If nothing the problem is upstream. If you get fuel, the problem is the float valve.

Triumph6100 Avatar
Triumph6100 Paul Henderson
Roscoe, IL, USA   USA
It is not the stock ignition. Not exactly what all was replaced by the previous owner

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
I guess a picture is in order.

J.P.Rap Avatar
J.P.Rap J.P. Rap
Mount Hope, ON, Canada   CAN
1976 Triumph 1500 "Donna"
2007 Ford Ranger
I had a similar problem last year. Turned out to be a leak in the fuel line sucking air. That's an easy first check. Just make sure all the clamps are tight. Check your fuel filter while you're at it. Next thing I would check, if it's a ZS carb, feel the bottom of the float bowl and see if it's wet with fuel. There is an O ring under there that can fail after a while. You may have to turn the engine over a bit first to fill the bowl with fuel first.
Those are quick easy checks you can do on the fuel system but if they check out I would definitely check the ignition over before any carb disassembly.



"In this world, you must be oh so smart, or oh so pleasant. Well, for years I was smart. I recommend pleasant." Elwood P. Dowd

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