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Puddle under the car

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
I am probably getting way ahead of myself here, but last night I noticed a damp patch creeping out from under the car.

The car is in winter storage at a friends house and is due back on the road any day now.

I did not investigate at the time, I was busy with other things, but of course my mind started getting active at about 2am.

Last spring I replaced the clutch slave cyl with a LuK unit. All went well, but it is the only thing I can think of that might be the cause of a leak with the car just sitting there.

I'll try to get over there later today and see what is what.

Perhaps it was just a spill on the garage floor?

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Smithisretired Avatar
Smithisretired Michael Smith
Wells, ME, USA   USA
Maybe you be lucky and find it was just a cat using the oil-dry on the floor under the car...

gfe05111952 Avatar
gfe05111952 George Earwaker
Falls Church, VA, USA   USA
I hope it isn't a dripping fuel line. That could be bad.



George
1967 Triumph GT6
1967 Triumph Spitfire4 Mk2
1968 Triumph Spitfire Mk3

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70spit Jon B
Camas, WA, USA   USA
A fresh puddle is how I know my car still has fluids.

dherr2 Avatar
dherr2 David Herr
Adamstown, MD, USA   USA
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Rat Rod"
Don't all British cars "mark their territory"?

You really do have to look at it to see what it is. Dripping oil (engine, transmission, diff) is normal, brake fluid or antifreeze is not normal and means you need to fix the cause.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
A paper towel will tell you what it is.

GriffinNC Dennis D
Greenville, SC, USA   USA
Just the fact that dripping Diff/Trans fluid is considered "Normal" is funny.

In reply to # 1518745 by dherr2 Don't all British cars "mark their territory"?

You really do have to look at it to see what it is. Dripping oil (engine, transmission, diff) is normal, brake fluid or antifreeze is not normal and means you need to fix the cause.

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dherr2 Avatar
dherr2 David Herr
Adamstown, MD, USA   USA
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Rat Rod"
You can do the best job possible rebuilding these cars and despite all your efforts and expense, they still drip........

I am wondering if my Japanese engine/transmission and differential will start to leak now that they are in a British car

Smithisretired Avatar
Smithisretired Michael Smith
Wells, ME, USA   USA
I once had a Ferrari 246, otherwise known as a Dino. The service manager at the Ferrari dealer near where I used to live told me horror stories of the Dino. Horror stories for him, because customers would spend thousands of dollars having engines rebuilt, only to have the car puddling after about six months. According to him, various parts of the engine were made from different alloys, each with its own coefficient of expansion. After just a bit of use, the differences would cause gaskets to weep. I bought a mat to put under the car...

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RobTAR Robert I
Seattle, WA, USA   USA
If I ever get rich I'm going to buy a dino and drive every day it till the wheels fall off. That has been my dream car ever since I saw one as a young child 30 years ago.

Smithisretired Avatar
Smithisretired Michael Smith
Wells, ME, USA   USA
In reply to # 1518845 by RobTAR If I ever get rich I'm going to buy a dino and drive every day it till the wheels fall off. That has been my dream car ever since I saw one as a young child 30 years ago.

It was certainly my dream car and I got mine before the prices went to the moon. Unfortunately, I also sold it before the prices soared. Overall, lost money on the deal because, like so many other European cars of the early 1970s, rust protection was apparently an unknown science and the car required significant amounts of body work. Once on the road, I had the strangest things go wrong:

1. The clutch cable broke;

2. The starter motor developed a habit of not shutting off, even when the ignition key was turned to the "Off" position. More frustrating, the condition would not replicate itself on the bench. Removing the starter required dropping one of the exhaust headers -- you would not believe what Ferrari collected for new gaskets that the FLAPS did not sell.

3. The steering rack failed.

4. The DinoPlex electronic ignition was so terrible that the car came from the factory equipped with a backup points-and-condenser setup that only required a couple of wires to be switched.

It did not take much to drive the wheels off the car. Still, I rather wish that I had kept it.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
I didn't get out to the car today but spoke to my friend (she is not a car person) and it seems like it might be Dot 5 Brake/ clutch fluid comming from the location of the transmission.

I don't want to read too much into this without first looking at the car, but tonight, my gut says the new slave developed a leak over the winter.

If this is the case, the irony is, the ONLY leak the car has made in the past was about three drips worth of clutch fluid over about 4 months winter storage. So, of course, in an attempt to fix a minor leak in a 44 year old component, I made matters much worse!

So, if this bares out, where do I go from here?

First off, No way do I want to remove the 'H' bracket and transmission tunnel cover (which is the original fibreboard), I plan to cut an access hole, but have to check size and location.
I liked the look of the LuK slave, I did not fully disassemble it, but the bore and machine work seemed excellent.
I am thinking of polishing the bore with crocus cloth and fitting a seal kit.

I did this years ago when the brake master (re-sleeved by Apple Hydraulics) leaked when first fitted.


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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
OK, I have lost about 1" of fluid from the reservoir, it looks like a lot more on the polished concrete floor.

Tomorrow I plan to get the car up and running, I will also look underneath to better confirm the fluid is from the seals of the slave cyl, and not just a line fitting or bleed nipple.

Part of me wishes the fluid loss was total. In that I would be compelled to adress the issue now.

As it is, I have half a hope the seals might 'seat' with use, and the problem go away.

Hope springs eternal! ;-)

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
The car is up and running with no other issues.

It appears the leak is from the slave cyl seals, but is very small. Unless things get worst, I think I will just monitor it.

Perhaps if the car is parked for any period of time I will use a stick to create a little pressure on the clutch pedal, hoping that the seals might then seal a little better.

Other than that, I changed the spark plugs with a set of Denso 'U' groove plugs that I picked up. I'll see how they go.
There was nothing wrong with the old Bosch Platinum plugs, other than they are older than I can remember.
I'll hold onto them for a while just in case. :-)

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
I switched to DOT4 and noticed a drip vanish.

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