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replacing the sealing block

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tspitz Avatar
tspitz Tom S
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
Stripped the timing cover bolt.After having searched this issue I can't tell if the sealing block can be replaced by simply dropping the pan and removing the timing cover bolts or does it require removing both the pan and the timing cover? It appears that the timing cover is more of a chore since the radiator and crank pulley would need to be removed. I would be doing this with the engine in the car.

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1518156 by tspitz Stripped the timing cover bolt.After having searched this issue I can't tell if the sealing block can be replaced by simply dropping the pan and removing the timing cover bolts or does it require removing both the pan and the timing cover? It appears that the timing cover is more of a chore since the radiator and crank pulley would need to be removed. I would be doing this with the engine in the car.

I'd say it's worth a try to just drop the pan, I've done that successfully before.
You can always go full monty if needed.
Judicious use of a good gasket sealing compound is suggested (hint: less is more in most cases).
When replacing the pan gasket, suggest through cleaning to bare metal, then gasket compound only between the pan and gasket.
Leave the topside dry, or at least use a non-setting compound (Hylomar is the gold standard here).
This allows you to dis/re assemble the pan without destroying the gasket each time.

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
Tom,
It depends on your luck. If lucky you can remove the old sealing block without breaking the front engine plate gasket. If your luck doesn't stretch that far, you wind up pulling the engine plate off to replace that gasket. Some people would get away with patching things up with some type of form-a-gasket goo.
You also have the options of tapping for a larger bolt or a helicoil.
All the best,
Paul

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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
The radiator is easy to remove anyway and should be taken out of the line of fire to protect the core. You can always recover the antifreeze and pour it back in.

Are you going to have to use an easy out?

tspitz Avatar
tspitz Tom S
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
It's the bottom bolt on the timing cover that's stripped so I shouldn't need to use an easy out. I was thinking I could remove the timing cover bolts, drop the pan and then remove the aluminum sealing block. It sounds like that would be feasible if the block releases from the front engine plate gasket cleanly.

grunwald Bill Grunwald
Huntington Beach, CA, USA   USA
If you are going to pull the block, Goodparts.com sells a steel replacement which solves the issue permanently.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1518170 by tspitz It's the bottom bolt on the timing cover that's stripped so I shouldn't need to use an easy out. I was thinking I could remove the timing cover bolts, drop the pan and then remove the aluminum sealing block. It sounds like that would be feasible if the block releases from the front engine plate gasket cleanly.

It's the block that's stripped, not the bolt.
And the block is a malleable zinc alloy, not aluminum (one reason it strips so easily).
You will often find that they have been deformed and bent out of shape over the years.

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Roy Avatar
Roy roy o
Marietta, GA, USA   USA
Just run a 5/16 -18 tap in it & use a larger bolt . no need for disassembly

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
In reply to # 1518190 by Roy Just run a 5/16 -18 tap in it & use a larger bolt . no need for disassembly
Roy,
5/16-18 is going to coarse thread, but not increasing the size. 3/8" is the next size. So 3/8-16 would be the coarse thread.
All the best,
Paul

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
I have got away with tapping to coarse thread and intalling a stud with loctite.

Roy Avatar
Roy roy o
Marietta, GA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1518220 by spitfire50
In reply to # 1518190 by Roy Just run a 5/16 -18 tap in it & use a larger bolt . no need for disassembly
Roy,
5/16-18 is going to coarse thread, but not increasing the size. 3/8" is the next size. So 3/8-16 would be the coarse thread.
All the best,
Paul

Of course your right ! CRS

tspitz Avatar
tspitz Tom S
Kansas City, MO, USA   USA
If I understand this correctly I should tap it with a 5/16 x 18 tap and then use a 3/8 x 16 bolt? The current bolt should be a 5/16 x ?? fine thread and the coarse thread tap would deepen the threads of the hole allowing more "purchase" with the coarse thread bolt. Right? Couldn't I stay with a 5/16" bolt and just let the threads do the work?

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1518880 by tspitz If I understand this correctly I should tap it with a 5/16 x 18 tap and then use a 3/8 x 16 bolt? The current bolt should be a 5/16 x ?? fine thread and the coarse thread tap would deepen the threads of the hole allowing more "purchase" with the coarse thread bolt. Right? Couldn't I stay with a 5/16" bolt and just let the threads do the work?

What you stripped was not the bolt, it was the soft metal of the sealing block.
A fine and coarse 5/16 bolt are the same diameter.
Those threads are basically gone, there is nothing for a 5/16 bolt to 'grab onto'.

But go ahead and try a 5/16 coarse, won't hurt anything now, and maybe there is a 'nubbin' of the threads remaining in the
sealing block that it can grab. Just use gentle hand force to thread it in, else you will strip the 'nubbin' away too.

The hole in the sealing block is 'blind', closed on the end, so a longer bolt or a tap will just hit bottom and strip the threads.

skyking1231 Avatar
skyking1231 Silver Member Frank Strobel
Mt. Sinai, NY, USA   USA
1975 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Lil' Rose"
when i had a stripped hole in my sealing block (replaced since)...i used a helicoil. worked perfectly.

N5329K Avatar
N5329K Silver Member Robin White
Pacific Grove, CA, USA   USA
I also used a helicoil in the sealing block where the PO had tightened the bolt with too much enthusiasm. Zero leaks.
Robin

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