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more oumph for a Herald engine?

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Fend-la-bise Avatar
Fend-la-bise Bruce W
Mazamet, Tarn, France   FRA
g'day all. I'm having difficulty finding an FC engine for my 1964 Spitfire rebuild. (Any ideas gratefully received.) I do have a Herald engine (GA156120HE) Is this a simple drop in replacement? What can I do to give it a bit more oumph?

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Lizzard d id
san jose, CA, USA   USA
Replace the head with a high compression head from a spitfire , replace the cam with a higher performance / higher state of tune unit , spitfire 1147 carbs and manifold , spitfire header .

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
I think a lot of your questions were answered back in October.

But what exactly do you have other than an engine block? What do you have for Carbs, Manifold etc.?

Is the cyl head on the engine you have the original (considering it's age, it may well have been switched)

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
Do the same things that Triumph did when they adapted the Herald motor for the Spitfire.
All the parts are stock items.
While you are at it, perhaps upgrade it to Spitfire Mk II level where possible ... larger cam followers, etc.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
I think that Herald engine will have a coil spring clutch also.

All things considered (I belive this is a frame off restoration) If you can't go original, could you not find a 1300 block or even a 1500 to work with?

All things are possible, all the Triumph SC engines are interchangable (to a degree) but I imagine you are wanting the best bang for your buck (or Euro). I just think putting machine shop money into that engine you have may not be the way to go.

Fend-la-bise Avatar
Fend-la-bise Bruce W
Mazamet, Tarn, France   FRA
Thank you all for your comments. I rather feel as you do Tony that perhaps a 1300 or 1500 block might be a better way to go. I must photograph the head and the manifold to show you. I have the two 11/4" su that a friend is rebuilding for me. As yet I am struggling to remove the rear hubs so as to be able to change the roller bearings, sandblast and paint. The rest of the drive train has been done and the chassis; so early days yet but it doesn't stop me thinking ahead.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1511554 by Fend-la-bise Thank you all for your comments. I rather feel as you do Tony that perhaps a 1300 or 1500 block might be a better way to go. I must photograph the head and the manifold to show you. I have the two 11/4" su that a friend is rebuilding for me. As yet I am struggling to remove the rear hubs so as to be able to change the roller bearings, sandblast and paint. The rest of the drive train has been done and the chassis; so early days yet but it doesn't stop me thinking ahead.

Maybe too it's late if you have already disassembled the rear hubs, but unless they are known to have issues
(noisy bearings, loose, rough when rotated), I'd leave them alone.
Just clean up the outside and paint, then apply fresh new lubricant.

Success rate for repairs by first timers is optimistically 50%.
Note that success is defined by more than just getting them apart and back together.
It's easy to permanantly damage the parts due to the force required to disassemble.
The outer flange inner taper must mate tightly to the axle shaft taper for success.
The damage is not apparent to the naked eye, but the center nut never again stays tight, and eventually the
Woodruff key can shear and allow the flange to spin on the shaft.

HTH

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
I agree with Carter, the rear hubs are best left alone unless you know there is a problem. Then, you need a special puller in order to seperate the Axel from the hub. It will be very unlikely that you can do this with a normal, universal puller and even a shop press will likely just cause damage.

Fend-la-bise Avatar
Fend-la-bise Bruce W
Mazamet, Tarn, France   FRA
I hear you. Thanks for the warning. I've certainly made no impression with a puller and heating. I just hope I haven't done any permanent damage. As a matter of interest how do you c hange the bearings if you haven't access to the specialised puller. I wouldn't know where to find one over here in France.

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1511613 by Fend-la-bise I hear you. Thanks for the warning. I've certainly made no impression with a puller and heating. I just hope I haven't done any permanent damage. As a matter of interest how do you c hange the bearings if you haven't access to the specialised puller. I wouldn't know where to find one over here in France.

The heating has probably done no damage, but the puller may have bent the flange 'ears', hard to tell without a dial indicator.
Without a tool to stabilize the flange while applying force, it's very difficult to split it loose from the axle without damage.
Some have built their own tools.
Often a Spitfire club will acquire the tool, to loan it's members. Perhaps find a local club and seek their advice/assistance.
Rimmer brothers list the tool for about 100 Euro, and new flanges are about the same price.

https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RX1542
https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-FAM2004

mainer4 Avatar
mainer4 howard allen
Limington, ME, USA   USA
Hi! When I purchased my 1973 1500 it had the 1200CC 1965 Herald engine in it (long story). No issues with the clutch (hydraulic) or any other thing having to do with fitment other than the exhaust was modified as I recall the downpipe was smaller than the Spitfire's original so they welded it together. That engine is long gone now as I have replaced it with the proper 1500CC engine although frankly, from a performance perspective, it wasn't much of an upgrade due to all the desmogging stuff they added to the US based 1500 engine.

Smithisretired Avatar
Smithisretired Michael Smith
Wells, ME, USA   USA
Try a Ford 289. Or better yet, a 427.

Worked for Carroll Shelby...

(Sorry...couldn't help myself)

Fend-la-bise Avatar
Fend-la-bise Bruce W
Mazamet, Tarn, France   FRA
Thank you Carter for the link to the appropriate tool. Hopefully I haven't done too much damage using the makeshift tool here in the photo. Even so I could not budge it!


Attachments:
20180205_114211.jpg    52.3 KB
20180205_114211.jpg

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
This is the tool I have, the battery is for size comparison. It is very bobust! But even so, even with a long extension on my socket for leverage, it is not 100% certain to break the hub/axel.


Attachments:
1517934618107-1088635728.jpg    21.5 KB
1517934618107-1088635728.jpg

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