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DIY Wood Steering Wheel - Spitfire Version

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Born Loser Avatar
Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
I made a steering wheel, using the very useful and informative tutorial in our Tech Library. Its 6 parts, and has lots of details. You can find it here: Original DIY Wood Steering Wheel. Its by Mitch BGT.

What this thread is: I adapted the MG wheel Mitch documented, and made one for our Spitfires (15 inch in particular). In addition to the dimensions changing, I changed a few other things as well. I offer my modifications, and alternative assembly techniques, as another perspective for those contemplating doing this project. I also wanted to give a platform for any Q & A's that come up.

What this thread is NOT: A ground breaking way to make your own steering wheel. Mitch offered his idea's up, and I took them! The overall concept is the same as what is covered in the original Tech Library entries. It is also NOT a critique of Mitch's project, or wood working skills. He did a fabulous job of both creating the idea, and executing it. That he went through the trouble of sharing it with us is incredible, and I am in his debt. Without his TUT, I would not have initiated this project. This thread also is NOT a stand alone TUT. Rather than create an entire tutorial here (that's already been done, see link above!), I am going to highlight the differences in our techniques and approaches.

Why did I do it? The dash and steering wheel were shot on our father-son build. My son wanted a dark dash. and after reading Mitch's tut, I figured a matching wood wheel would look much better than a leather wrap (the alternative).

What tools did I use: I have a fairly good selection of wood working tools, but, for this project, there really is only 1 tool you MUST have - a router. I can see lots of ways to get each step done, but without a router, you just can't cut the groove for the steel rim. A bench, or table, for the router, makes the round overs easy, but, even that is not required if you are going for a more squared, Classic Moto-Lita style rim. I use a router that can be mounted on the bench, but also has a "plunge" base - this is not required, but makes the circle cuts very easy. I also used a chop saw/electric miter saw. Mine is a very inexpensive one, but I did put a thick blade on it- to prevent any bending or movement during the cut. These cuts could be made with a miter box and a hand saw in a pinch, but they are important - accuracy to hit 30° is required. A table saw could also make these cuts, but, then each piece being exactly the same length gets a bit tricky. Not 100% required, but I also used a band clamp, as well as 6 small clamps. In addition, I made a few tools. 1) An angle/length stop on the miter saw. Made out of scrap 2) A drum sander out of a hole saw. a strip of sandpaper, and some tape. 3) A wheel clamp, out of the left over routing scraps.

Choosing the wood:I mixed up some stains, and tried them on different woods, and my son settled on Walnut, with a 50/50 mix of American Walnut/Gun stock for the finish. I needed enough wood for the dash, the steering wheel, and a shift knob. I looked around locally, and folks were very proud of their wood selections. I looked on Ebay, and found allot of Walnut very inexpensive. I found a lot that had 3 boards, and one was big enough to make the entire dash out of - so the grain would line up. The other 2 pieces had enough wood for the wheel and the knob. Only down side, it was thick. 1 inch thick. But, it was $14, and I had it in hand in a week.

Making a plan: I relied heavily on Mitch's tut on the size of everything, and how the steel would mount. After giving it thought, I also agreed a hexagon, 6 equal sides, was the way to go. I had wide enough wood, I could have just put 2 pieces together, and there would only be 2 seems in the whole thing. But then, they grain would not be going in the right direction very often, and I liked the look of the segments as well. So, maybe 8? Too many seams, it was too busy, and segments looked chopped up. 6 was just right. I also agreed with the 1 inch wide by 1" 1/8 deep wheel itself. You will see, you can make things as wide as you like very easily. The depth will be determined by how thick your 2 or 3 pieces of wood are. Next up was the diameter. I cut a little bit of the old grip away. 2 spots, 180° apart. Then I measured from center to center of the steel rim. This would be the center of the groove in the wood rim. For my '70 Spit wheel, that was 14 1/4". I had made a drawing based on Mitch's dimensions, and I updated it for the Spit. There would be 2 hexagons - the top, and bottom - so, I would need to cut 12 trapezoids 9 5/8" X 5 3/4", 3" wide, with opposite 30° angles. I did not want an accent piece, so one would be 5/8", and one would be 1/2" (1 1/8" total thickness).

Trimming the stock Thickness is a preference, and can be achieved several ways. This project could easily be made to 1", if all you have access to is 1/2" thick wood. Or, as Mitch did, add a 1/8 layer. Or as I did, make 2 different thicknesses out of 1" lumber. The easy way to make a 1" board 1/2" is to run it through a planner. "My" planner is actually still my dads planner, with my name on it in his Will. And he lives about 1500 miles away. So, I had to come up with another plan. Knowing I would be cutting off the corners of my 7 1/8" X 51" boards helped. Also knowing I would be using very little of the face meant it did not have to be perfectly smooth - another +. So I chucked a straight cut bit (plunging) into the router, and mounted it on the bench. I took off about 3/8 at a time, and left "feet" for the board to be supported on across the bench. When the board was the proper thickness, I slowly "plunged the router on the "feet" I had left, until they were level with the rest of the board. Kinda crude, I wouldn't want my formal dinning table made that way, but worked just fine for this. Next was the width. My mock up drawing called for 3" boards. 3 1/2 is normal for purchasing, so if that is what you have, it will work fine. I ran mine through the table saw, to get a clean edge, and that left it 3".



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace



Edited 5 time(s). Last edit at 2015-05-05 07:12 AM by Born Loser.

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Born Loser Avatar
Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
Cutting the trapezoids: In the bottom left of my drawing, you see the dimensions of the trapezoid. The lengths are not that critical, they determine the diameter. The important part of the length, they need to all be the same. One of the most critical cuts of the project is getting this angle correct. It should be 30° exactly. You will be putting this angle together 12 times. If its 29°, you will only have 348° of your required 360°. 29.5° is still 6° short, the last piece simply will not touch the first piece on assembly. A couple things to help with this. 1) Like Mitch, I used a 30/60/90 from my drafting set to set the blade, and check the cuts. My saw was off just a smidge (smidge x 12 = 2°). While cutting, I saw my blade "wonder" just a bit after it started cutting. I swapped the very light and thin blade (and probably a bit too dull) with the old planner blade my dad gave me (a bit early - he is still alive and healthy). That sucker is thick, and did not deflect at all - yielding a very straight cut. Next I cut 6 pieces the same length (very short, just checking the angle, not the size) of scrap, and found the angle was just a bit too steep. I made the smallest of adjustments, and did it again. Close enough a tiny bit of sanding on the first piece and last piece brought them together. Next up, I screwed a piece of wood to the end of the miter saw, then set the length with a piece of the last "test" with the correct angle. Now, as long as i pushed my stock against the fence, and the piece I just attached, all the cuts will be the same length. Just needed to flip the stock after each cut.

Strength: There will be very little wood glued to wood at each of the joints, so the strength of each segments joint will be very weak. To address this, Mitch uses slots and splines to beef up the joints. I had a different take. I decided to skip that, I just don't care for the look. My plan was to simply off-set the top and bottom, so the segment joints fall in the middle of the opposite sides segments. That, and glue both top and bottom firmly to the steel rim. The steel will take the load, not the segment joints. This approach means you do have to use care while handling the none-assembled 1/2's.

Making the Hexagons: I simply laid out the pieces, like Mitch, on waxpaper. Added glue to one side, and worked my way around. I used Tightbond III. No particular reason, its just what I have, and has always done a fine job. Use whatever you use. I also used a simple strap clamp. If you don't have one, there are all sorts of ways to clamp it all together. I would probably just use a small ratchet strap - they are about the same thing.

Cutting out the circles - the Circle Jig: I have an incredible router table. Its a cast iron leaf, that is attached to my cast iron table saw. Unlike Mitch, I think cutting circles is best done with a circle jig, so I didn't use either one. My "circle jig" is just a piece of plywood that I drilled mounting screws into for my router. It will work just like Mitch's compass, but instead of drawing a line, it will cut wood. To get the opening for the blade, I just plunged the 3/8 strait bit through the ply wood. It has made allot of circles in its day. for the pivot point, I use a finishing nail. 2 actually. I cut the head off of one, and chuck it in my drill as a drill bit. With the router mounted on the jig, I just measure from the bit edge to my radius, then "drill" a hole in the jig. This is where the finish nail will pin the jig to the center of the circle I am about to cut.

Cutting out the circles - mounting the wheel: The second part is the stock has to be firmly held, and the center (for the finish nail in the jig) needs to be solid. I differed from Mitch on how to do this as well. My idea was to screw the hexagon to a piece of plywood. Then take a piece of scrap (1/2 or 5/8, depending on how thick the hexagon was) and screw it to the center. The screw points would be on the inside middle of the segments, that's the one place the wheel will not go. I found the center by laying a straight edge across the joints, and drawing a line. Where all 3 lines touched is the center. I used my finish nail drill bit, and made it permanent.

Cutting out the circles - the 3 cuts: I drew up a cross section of what I wanted the wheel to actually be when it was done. I wanted to make sure the grove would fit inside the wood. I measured several wheels around, and found that most were not round. They were offset, 3/8 curve on the outside, 1/2 curve on the inside. I kinda liked the idea, so I offset the steel rim grove, to allow for the extra curve. Later, my son, wife, and a few people I don't even really know would tell me that was a bad idea. So I didn't round it off that way, but I did make it that way. You should probably just center your 3/8" grove inside-to-outside that is. The depth I have exactly right on this drawing. 3/16" deep on the bottom piece (the 1/2" piece), and 7/16 for the top (the 5/8" piece). The other tricky part about the 3 cuts, is getting the pin in the correct spot - not just measuring correctly, but knowing WHAT to measure really. It can get confusing. Take your time and triple check before you turn your hexagons into scrap. The thing to remember is you are measuring the radius of your cut, from the INSIDE of the bit. You should be using a 3/8 bit (because the steel rim needs a 3/8 slot). So you have to add or subtract to get the measurement from the bit to the center hole you are about to make with the finishing nail. In this case (assuming the grove is centered outside to inside), the 3 cuts are:
1) Outside diameter: 15 1/4". The radius is 7 5/8". So you measure from the INSIDE of the bit, 7 5/8", and drill your hole. That cut will give you an outside circle of 15 1/4". This is the first cut you make. Start by taking about 3/16" depth, and increase each pass about the same. I use a plunge router for this, it makes the starts much easier.
2) The groove for the steel rim: 14 1/4 centered. Radius is 7 1/8". But that's to the center of your bit - very hard to measure. the RADIUS of your bit is 3/16". So, measure 6 15/16" from the inside of your bit, and make your hole. The depth of this cut is 3/16" for the bottom (1/2" board), and 7/16" for the top (5/8" board).
3) The inside diameter: 13 1/4". The radius is 6 5/8". This cut will be from the OUTSIDE of the bit, so subtract the bit, 3/8" to measure from the inside. That's 6 1/4. Cut your depth as the first one, the Outside diameter, but leave just a tinny bit for the last pass. Then lower the bit just a little, and go around as smoothly as possible, completing the cut.



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace



Edited 5 time(s). Last edit at 2015-05-05 07:39 AM by Born Loser.


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Born Loser Avatar
Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
Pic 1, the mount.
Pic 2 The groove cut
Pic 3 The inside cut
Pic 4 Just a bit left of the last cut



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace

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Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
Shaping the halves: Once both halves are cut out, the should stack nicely. This is a good time to run some 120 grit sand paper around the outside and inside, to get that perfect alignment. I copied Mitch's idea about the pins. I just cut off the heads of 3 finish nails (made them very short, and used a 4th nail as a drill bit. I made a small hole, and pressed the nails in, pointy side up, about 120° apart. No glue, the friction was a tight fit. Next I aligned the top as carefully as I could, off-setting the joints on the top, to the middle of the segments on the bottom, and pressed down. Now the 2 half's had alignment pins, and they would go together the same way from here on out. I made a "drum sander" by taping some 120 sand paper to a 1"1/4 hole saw. Chucked into a drill, and ran around the inside that way.

Preparing the rim: To get the old rim ready, I needed to cut the old padding off of the steel rim. My son came home just in time to get handed a utility knife and a stool. It took a bit, but he got it down to just metal.

The reliefs: The rim fit perfectly into the groove, and it was reasonably round. The next part was to cut reliefs for the spokes. I decided during planning that this would be done on the bottom piece, and that's why its groove is 3/16" deep - that's the thickness of the spoke. I marked the opening, and took a chisel the first one. It took some doing, to get it perfectly flat. So, I put the router back in the table mount, set the height at 3/16" and made the other 2 cuts perfectly in about a minute. The top was not so easy. Where the spokes joined the rim, there was a substantial weld. I relief would have to be cut out, near the groove, to allow for it. It would not show when assembled. A chisel would have worked here as well, but, I made a blind route on the table, since it was already set up.

Pic 1 - The finished circles.

Pic 2 - Marking the reliefs

Pic 3 - The reliefs done

Pic 4 - The reliefs done, rim in place



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2015-05-05 07:44 AM by Born Loser.


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Born Loser Avatar
Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
Making the "square wheel" round: Mitch opted for a very round wheel. I had decided that I didn't want it that round, so I used a 3/8 round over bit in the router, instead of a 1/2. I would later decide that was "too square", and hand sand it more. This part is personal preference, and I spent allot of time getting it "just right" - for me anyway. The operation was basically exactly like Mitch did it. If you don't have a table, you can sand it by hand, or have a helper hold it, and move with you as you route it from the top.

Spokes: The folks at Triumph have had some real great ideas over the years. The "black out package" on the '70 Spit was not one of them. Sorry purist, I have already removed every trace of the black out, except the steering wheel. I am sure in this first photo, your first thought was not "that wood working looks great". It was probably "the black does not work!". I set out to do something about it. The paint was on there really well, so I used a bit of the Spra stripper I had left from the paint job. Next I cleaned it up with 220 in my finish sander. Then 400, 600, 1000, 1500, and then 2000. Hmmm, brushed steel! That look works! When I got the spokes done (the inside of the cuts got a very small drill bit, with the proper grade paper taped to it), i clear coated them.


Pic 1 - Rounded corners
Pic 2 - 1st spoke brushed
Pic 3 - All spokes brushed
Pic 4 - Brushed spokes fitted to the wheel



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2015-05-04 02:10 PM by Born Loser.


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Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
Finger grooves - layout:I looked at (and grabbed) allot of steering wheels to come up with a layout. What I decided on was 1 1/8" centers, 3/16"s deep. The arc would be my 1 1/4" hole saw, wrapped in 80 grit. Like Mitch, I would skip the spokes. I used the plywood I had cut out the rims with, and it still had the centers screwed in place. So I broke off a piece of the outside scrap, and found I could make a kind of clamp, by pressing it into the wheel, and clamping it down. I could spin the wheel, but there was good resistance. Next I took that outside piece of scrap, and glued a bit more scrap under it, making it thicker. I then sanded that piece until it sat precisely 3/16" lower than the top of the wheel. I had my depth gauge.

Finger grooves - shaping: I used a file to start the grove. The idea was to rotate the wheel so the line pointed strait at the center hole. Then, just had to keep the file pointed straight, and made a pilot groove. Next I grabbed the drill, with some force, and followed the pilot down, until the sandpaper just hit the "guide". Rotate the wheel to the next mark and repeat. When it was done, i lightly ran the drum sander over all the grooves, in both directions, knocking down the sharp edge where they started.


Pic 1 Spacing the finger grooves
Pic 2 Starting the grooves with a file
Pic 3 Drum sanding the grooves
Pic 4 Grooves cut



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 2015-05-05 07:51 AM by Born Loser.


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Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
Final shaping: After the finger grooves were done, I could really get a since of how the wheel sat in my hand. I thought it was just a bit too squared off. So I took some 100 grit, tore it into strips long wise. Added some duct tape (for strength) to the back, and went to work knocking off the corners. I clamped it down well, and gave it a good going over, top and bottom. This was the final shape. When I was satisfied, I hit it again, with 220. She was ready to be glued.

Glue, and other sticky stuff: My approach here was based on the strength concept I had used when I decided to skip the splines. I was going to assemble the thing upside down - so the rim would be touching the top, and lay flat. I laid a heavy bead of Liquid Nails in the groove of the top, going a bit lighter around the spoke openings (to prevent any pushing out those openings). Then I put about 4 beads in the groove for the bottom (going on top now). I figured that would bond the steel wheel to the wood, taking up any dead space, and taking all the force. Next I applied Tightbond wood glue to the areas the Walnut would touch Walnut. I clamped it, tapped it, and clamped it some more. Its important to run a damp paper towel around the joints, cleaning off any glue, Stain does not color glue, all the glue will have to be sanded off (its 100 times easier to wipe it off wet than sand it off dry). Then went to bed.

Color and finish: After a quick going over with 220, just to be sure I didn't leave any glue, and taping up the spokes that were clear-coated, it was time for color. Matching the dash and shift knob, I already new the recipe. For compatibility, the line would be MInwax. First conditioner, for about 15 minutes, then wiped clean. Next was a 50/50 mix of American Walnut / Gun Stock. I let that sit for about 10 minutes before it got wiped down. I gave it a day or 2, just to be sure it was ready. I used spray Polyurethane, gloss. It goes on slow, but, there is much danger of a run with all the curves, and the aerosol helps with that control, compared to a brush that tends to puddle. You can see the rig I used in the vice. To be sure I got every angle, I held it and rotated it as I sprayed. I laid down about 6 coats, gave it 3 days to cure, then sanded it down with 220 - until all the shinny was gone. It then got 3 more coasts (The can ran dry at some point, I needed a second to finish it). I sanded it with 440, again until the shiny was gone. The last coat was fairly heavy, and I put it on slow so it wouldn't run. Probably took about 15 minutes to complete the last coat. Then back in the vice - for 3 days. We peeled the tap, and mounted the wheel.

The push button and surround: The UV rays had really grayed up the rubber and plastic. I used some automotive "Back N Black" on the doughnut, and hit the horn button with the polisher. They didn't come back midnight black, but were a good spot better.

This was a fun job. I can not say how many hours I have in it, not too many, they were just broken up over a week or so. The cost of the wood was $14, and I had everything else, so I am not sure what the true cost would be, probably around $50, doing it this way - if you had all the tools, or could borrow them. I did go through allot of sandpaper in all grits, dressing up the spokes.

Thanks again to Mitch for the really great TUT in the Tech Library!

Feel free to ask questions, or comment below.
Matthew


Pic 1 - Gluing it together
Pic 2 - Adding some color
Pic 3 - The finger groves
Pic 4 - Matching dash and shift knob



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace



Edited 5 time(s). Last edit at 2015-05-05 08:04 AM by Born Loser.

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Yellowhawk Valley Avatar
walla walla, WA, USA   USA
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Walla Walla"
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Portland"
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Spokane"
1975 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Dayton"    & more
Great documentation Mathew and a nice job.. I suggest you create tech artcle and add it to the info here. No reason we can only have one article.
Dan

OldBlue Avatar
OldBlue Doug Johns
Elyria, OH, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB "Colonel Mustard"
Nice job, and looks great! Thanks for posting your process. Makes me want to try it, though I don't have a router.... hmm.....



Doug

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Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
Matthew, thank you for taking the time to put this all togrther! It will be very helpful when the time comes to build our own steering wheels.

Doug



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"

dvcasano Avatar
dvcasano Platinum Member David Casano
Amsterdam, NY, USA   USA
This will be a tough act to follow, great information. You have all but made it idiot proof. Wonderful job, you have really personalized your Spitfire.

Born Loser Avatar
Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1287670 by OldBlue ...Makes me want to try it, though I don't have a router.... hmm.....

A note about routers: There are 3 types of people in the world -
1) Those that don't own a router, but wish they did;
2) Those that have a crappy router, and wish they had better;
3) Happy people.

Life is not that simple, but that tongue-in-check categorization does apply to routing. I do dabble in wood working, and have since about 9, when I got cabinet making lessons for a birthday gift. I used a $50 Craftsman router (the cheapest they had) until I literately burned the motor up (probably 10 years). It will do this job. The parts are plastic, setting the height requires a bunch of test cuts, because the plastic isn't precise, and will shift the first time under load. The motor will strain - allot. It will do it, but you will have to go slow, and cut shallow. This is like taking your non-OD Spit on a 300 mile interstate trip. It will do it...but, there might be better options, if you have them. If you don't, just know what you are in for and plan accordingly. The router I have used for the past 15 years or so, was about $180 (back then). Routing went from a chore, to a joy. The big improvements: A very solid adjustment system. Soft start, much safer. 2 bases. I mount the "regular" base on the table full time. Then I can move the router, in about 30 seconds, to the plunge base. 1/2" chuck, can take any bit. And the power. It has as much HP as a 1980 MGB. Ok, not really, but it is a full 2 hp. and I have never needed more.

My advice - if you don't have a router, and really only want one for this project, don't buy one. Beg, borrow, and ...beg some more...from someone with a pro level router. You can barrow mine if you want - I just require your wife as collateral (picture application required). If you want to get into some basic routing, and want to purchase a router, step it up, get a plunge router at the least. You will just end up replacing a starter router eventually anyway, and all that frustration could have been joy!

The bits: For this project you need two. A 3/8 strait cut plunge. Plunge is usually not on the package, but, you can tell its a plunge bit because it has a cutting tip on the very top. You can get these from $5 to $55. The $5 will do this project, with a little burning, and probably one more. The $55 will slice through Walnut like butter, for your grandkids. You can use this bit for making circles for the rest of your life. Mine is probably in the $20 range, and has lasted a long long time. Spend what you can here. The second bit is the round over. Get one with the pilot bearing. They are in all the sizes. The most commonly used are 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2". Mitch used a 1/2" to get a round top and bottom. I used a 3/8, and some sanding to leave a flat spot on the top and bottom. Personal choice here.



Here is the modern version of my router: http://www.sears.com/craftsman-12-amp-2-hp-fixed-plunge-base-router/p-00927683000P

Here are a couple of my router projects from the past. The train table has no hardware, every joint is a tenon and mortise. I made every one with my cheap router, and cheap bits. It took about 6 months, and I felt like I gave birth when it was done. The next project is my telescope. I used this project as an excuse to get the "good router" - $1,000 telescope for $300 + a new router and bits. You can see the router work everywhere on this thing. It was so much fun, I made another one with a buddy. I want to do it again, but can't justify it.

Pic 1 - Cheap router and bits, Mortise and Tenon. Very slow going, but doable
Pic 2 - Pro level router and bits. Very quick, easy work.



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible
2018 Jaguar F-Pace


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Train Table1.jpg    33.2 KB
Train Table1.jpg

2nd scope 010.JPG    37.7 KB
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MHKflyer52 Avatar
MHKflyer52 Martin Keller
Ventura, CA, USA   USA
Matthew Taylor that is some fine craftsmanship.
I can work metal but for some reason wood eludes my a abilities unless it is very simple and straight forward.
I have been following your post on how you made your steering wheel with amazement and thinking how talented you are.
Very nice work.
cool smiley



Martin Keller
Ventura, CA.
1971 Triumph GT6 (A work always in progress.)

Dickie B Avatar
Dickie B Dickie Brewer
Clover, SC, USA   USA
1973 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Rose"
1982 Chevrolet Corvette "Buddy"
1991 BMW 850i "Rocket"
2005 Nissan Frontier V6 "NIZMO"
Most excellent write-up. One of the best on this site.
I too own a router, it's just a whole lot smaller smiling smiley

This is some hand cut inlay and router work on one of the guitars I've made in the past.
I made it for my Dad for his 70th birthday.
He played in bluegrass bands his whole life.


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Rosette, Dremmel tool, MOP outer ring.jpg    35.1 KB
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Finished Guitar 8.jpg    35.4 KB
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Fretboard, inlaying, 6-2-07 012.jpg    29.2 KB
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OldBlue Avatar
OldBlue Doug Johns
Elyria, OH, USA   USA
1970 MG MGB "Colonel Mustard"
Thanks Matthew, and nice job Dickie! I did have a nice plunge router a number of years ago, but someone "borrowed" it from my unlocked garage one night. Never did replace it. I may have to!



Doug

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