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TR4 Front End Alignment

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tirnipgreen Avatar
tirnipgreen Silver Member Ryals Cheek
Ellijay, GA, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4 "YIN"
1965 Triumph TR4 "YANG"
In December, I had the front end on the white car, "Yang", rebuilt by the Sportscar Craftsmen in Denver. I did this because I wanted to drive it back to Georgia, rather than shipping it. They replace everything except the steering rack, which I wish they had. They claim to have set the toe-in. As I drove, it was apparent that there was something amiss in the car's tracking. I drove through lots of little towns along the way, but could find not one tire shop who would touch the car's alignment. As I look at the car, it seems as though the front wheels are set to a narrower track on the bottom than on the top. I would call it "canted in" at the bottom. \ / Get it...? I took it to a shop today and the "old school" alignment guy used a tape measure to adjust the toe by hooking a tape measure into the tread on one tire and measuring straight across to the other...on the front and the rear of the front tires. He stated that the car's front end was "toe out 5/16" and proceeded to loosen the driver's (left) side outer tie rod end and tighten it until he read 51" on both the front and the back of the front tires. He said that's as good as he could do because there was no way to adjust for the canted \ / stance of the wheels. It does drive better...much better, pulls to the right a bit, but corners much better. Any and all thoughts would be appreciated...Ryals



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-25 06:18 PM by tirnipgreen.

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Geo Hahn Avatar
Mt Lemmon, AZ, USA   USA
Toe-in alignment is pretty easy to set with basic household items including tape measures, rafter squares, spirit levels etc depending on which method you choose. I set mine using 4 jack stands, some thread and a ruler. There are also purpose-made tools for this.

Certainly toe-out could cause some funny handling & tire wear - the car would probably want to dart on direction or the other, particularly on a highly crowned road.

The canting you describe is the camber which, so far as I know, is not meant to be adjustable on a TR4. I can be affected by accident damage and it is certainly worth measuring if you think it is not at spec which is +2° (and hard to see to my eye).

jplatel1 jacob P
Albany, NY, USA   USA
Check and see that the fulcrum pins are installed correctly. They can be installed 180 degrees the wrong direction and it can alter camber dramatically. It's the same part for tr3-tr6 but it installed 180 degrees out for tr4a-tr6, so a tech may do it accidentally

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tirnipgreen Avatar
tirnipgreen Silver Member Ryals Cheek
Ellijay, GA, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4 "YIN"
1965 Triumph TR4 "YANG"
I thought about the potential fulcrum pin fiasco.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-27 07:36 AM by tirnipgreen.

tirnipgreen Avatar
tirnipgreen Silver Member Ryals Cheek
Ellijay, GA, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4 "YIN"
1965 Triumph TR4 "YANG"
OK....Checked the F-Pins...AOK...!

jplatel1 jacob P
Albany, NY, USA   USA
Both wheels have similar camber issues? I know early cars and late cars have different coil spring lengths. Is it possible they installed a later spring in an early car that usually uses a short spring+ aluminum spacer? Adding an inch to the necessary spring length creating camber issue?

Also, I'm not sure about this on this one, but is it possible that you have the wrong trunnions installed? I kbow there are a few different ones that all probably thread onto the tr4 vertical link... I can't visualize how different trunnions may affect camber, but it's maybe its worth considering?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-25 10:03 PM by jplatel1.

jplatel1 jacob P
Albany, NY, USA   USA
Pull a wheel and take some photos if you don't mind!

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twomanytriumphs Avatar
twomanytriumphs Gold Member Kyle Darby
Kelso, WA, USA   USA
1965 Triumph TR4 "My Baby"
1966 Triumph 2000 MkI "Bessie"
1970 Triumph GT6+ (MkII) "The Princess"
1977 MG MGB
Did they replace the springs? There was a batch of uprated springs made that caused that issue with mine. I finally put the stock springs back in and the issue went away. It could be that new springs need time to relax a bit? My gt6 is still nose high and it’s been sitting on the springs 4 years and a motor in the car for 2 years. Kyle.

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
2 degrees is about 1/2" when measured at the edges of the rim. If you have a nice flat floor, you can check it with a carpenters square, two 6" rulers and a couple of clamps.

Just a smidgen of toe-in (books says 1/16" for radial tires) will help it track better (the suspension deflects a bit at speed), but be sure to have the car level and sitting on the suspension when you check it. This will compensate for any differences in spring length (the toe changes slightly as the suspension moves).

Also, the tread does not always run perfectly straight, so it's better IMO to spin the tire (with the car off the ground obviously) and make a mark. I generally use my pocket knife and rest it on a jack stand or similar to make the mark.

Here's a crude drawing of the tool I use; just two rectangular pieces of Masonite screwed to a length of 1x2 lumber. The Masonite is the right length to hit the center of the tire when it is vertical with the 1x2 laying on the ground. To use it, I stand it up behind the tires and transfer the mark on the tire to the Masonite with a pencil. Then move it up front, line up one pair of marks and measure the distance between the other pair. Should be 1/16" in this case, with the tire mark closer to the center of the car than the Masonite mark.



Note that it will always want to follow the crown of the road to some extent (which usually means pulling lightly to the right when driving on the right). Very few roads are perfectly level (so rainwater will run off faster).



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

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TR4EVER Avatar
TR4EVER James R Sullivan
Tuckasegee, NC, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR4 "Trouble"
1967 Triumph TR4A
Very impressive info, love this forum. Thanks to all for any and all help and guidance.
Randy in the boonies

malbaby Avatar
malbaby malcolm baker
kyabram, Australia   AUS
Post some pics of your current ride height as the coil springs may be too long or of a high load rating.

Trike4 Avatar
Trike4 Marcus G
Brighton, MI, USA   USA
1963 Triumph TR4
1963 Triumph TR4 "Trike"
So I put 120 miles on the car yesterday. There was an annoying pull to the left that I had never had before. Today I swapped left and right front tires and the pull is completely gone. The car tracks down the road straight no hands. Maybe worth a try.

If the pull moves to the right, swap the right front to the right rear. If the pull goes away you might have the tire checked.

Tommys4 Platinum Member Thomas G
Ojai, Calif., USA   USA
The only way to adjust the camber on a TR, is to buy a kit from RevingtonTR or Racetorations. Revington's is less money. If the car is stock you would have to replace parts.

Good luck TMG


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JimG Avatar
JimG Jim G
Aurora, CO, USA   USA
I believe your '65 TR has adjustable camber up front. In which case the guy working on the suspension got the shim stack wrong, or none at all if you have that much positive camber.
jim g



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-02-02 09:46 AM by JimG.


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