TRExp

TR7 & TR8 Forum

tr7 1982 purchase

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

dino1442 michel lefebvre
chambly, Canada   CAN
Hello

I am just about to purchase a 1982 tr7 covertible 6 cyl manual transmission.The car has always been kept inside . There is no rust whatsoever and the car and a new tr7 engine whic has 35000 kilometre on it.
I am briing it for a car inspection. As i not very knowledgebable about mechanics, is there something particular
i should may attention..All i know is the car drives like a blast

thanks
Michel

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
PAMidget Avatar
PAMidget Thomas Reimel
Philadelphia, USA   USA
Hey, Michel.

A couple things--no TR7 left the factory with a six-cylinder engine. All TR7s were manufactured with a longitudinally-mounted inline four-cylinder engine. Second, while that car may be registered as a "1982," it was built no later than 1981, when the line was shut down. If it has a six, it's a swap. Now, some engine swpas are very well done, and V-6s can make very nice motors for british sports cars. Nevertheless, any swapped-out should be thoroughly inspected. Moreover, I think an engine-swapped car is not usually the best choice for someone who is not very knowledgeable mechanically.
Here's a website that gives a basic hstory of the TR7 model. Good luck.

http://www.triumphtr7.com/documents/sitenav.asp

JGug1 Avatar
JGug1 James Guglielmino
Mission, KS, USA   USA
I don't know that I agree with the second part. My sense is that a V6 swap into a TR7 would be far easier to get worked on than a 7 with the 4 cylinder. I think that most of those swaps use GM, often Buick or Olds engines. Mine has a 4.1 liter Buick in it. The engine is the same on the outside as the 3.8. I still have my 4 cylinder TR7 engine sitting in a garage. I did a full build of the head and the car NEVER ran after that. The guy working on it didn't know how to deal with the "hockey pucks" used in the head. There is no such tuning issue with a GM with a 4 barrel carb. I'm wondering too, about fuel injection and may try it. The problem is that it would be 3K installed.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Mr. Nuts Peter N
Tucumcari, NM, USA   USA
Canada received a couple hundred 1982 model year TR7s and TR8s. A simple VIN check will tell you if it's a 1982 or not, but, it doesn't make much difference to anything. If in fact it is a V6, great I owned four of them myself and still own one. All of them are still on he road and running great except one that later got a Rover V8. I'd make sure they look at the brakes, front and rear suspension and if you guys use that damn ethanol fuel the fuel lines.
Good luck with your car.

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, CA, USA   USA
Michel,

I'd get as much info on the conversion from the current owner as you can, who did it, how was it done, when was it done? Because TR-7s are cheap they can be subject to some unfortunate band-aid conversions or it could be very nicely done, the John's Cars conversion kit for example. Also I'd see if the original motor is available and can be included in the sale.

James,

When you say "hockey pucks" I assume you're talking about the valve shims, which are common on OHC motors. The TR-7 is a pretty simple straight forward OHC motor, while it's a little late now, if your guy couldn't figure out how to deal with the valve shims, instead of a new motor maybe you just needed a new guy.

JGug1 Avatar
JGug1 James Guglielmino
Mission, KS, USA   USA
Michel,

I'd get as much info on the conversion from the current owner as you can, who did it, how was it done, when was it done? Because TR-7s are cheap they can be subject to some unfortunate band-aid conversions or it could be very nicely done, the John's Cars conversion kit for example. Also I'd see if the original motor is available and can be included in the sale.

James,

When you say "hockey pucks" I assume you're talking about the valve shims, which are common on OHC motors. The TR-7 is a pretty simple straight forward OHC motor, while it's a little late now, if your guy couldn't figure out how to deal with the valve shims, instead of a new motor maybe you just needed a new guy.


Kevin, i am indeed, referring to the valve shims. I know that the valves on OHC motors are adjusted using various size shims. It has just been long enough and I am old enough that I couldn't remember the proper nomenclature. As for the mechanic I was using, he did turn out to not be the right guy but my intention when I bought the car was to put in a John's Cars conversion V6 in any case. However, I kind of wanted to get the feel of the car by driving it while I accumulated the components. It turned out that the engine head gasket was bad and I decided to have a valve job done. When it couldn't be tuned by the guy doing the work, I just shelved the engine and went ahead with the V6. That also, turned out not well with the particular mechanic. I wasn't trying to go cheap. I'm just way too trusting.

By the way, I still have the engine with its unused EVER head on it. It had only about 35,000 miles on it. I keep it because it was not junk but no one has wanted it. Anyone offering me a good deal for it. (a good deal being good for everyone involved) can have it.

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, CA, USA   USA
James,

I'd be interested to hear about your John's Cars conversion. Several years ago I was thinking about doing the John's conversion also, I liked the fact that he offer a pre-engineered installation kit. Fortunately I never got around to it because it was later banned in the Peoples Republic of California, I would have had to pull everything out of the car and return it to stock if I wanted to drive it on the street.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, OR, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1509123 by sliproc James,

I'd be interested to hear about your John's Cars conversion. Several years ago I was thinking about doing the John's conversion also, I liked the fact that he offer a pre-engineered installation kit. Fortunately I never got around to it because it was later banned in the Peoples Republic of California, I would have had to pull everything out of the car and return it to stock if I wanted to drive it on the street.

Kevin:

California is a bit over the top in these matters. It seems like a person modifying a 40 year old automobile is hardly a threat to air quality - there cannot be many of them left on the road to modify.

In Oregon, the cutoff for cars is 1974 to be tested and inspected, so my TR8 is very much subject to inspection and testing.

I hot rod my motors, but leave them stock appearing. With a little care, you can easily pass the testing and still have a warmed over motor. On my Z28 Camaro, I had a very warm cam in the car (among other changes - tee-hee). I came it to the testing station with it loping away like a Nascar racer, but it looked stock, and handily passed emissions. The tech says "Sounds rough, but no check engine light and it passes, so enjoy". BTW, they check for excessive noise in Oregon as well, so the rice boys with the straight pipes on their teeny-tiny motors can't pass. They also check for CAT removal, so you better have them on your car. Some people hollow them out, but there is little to be gained as modern CAT designs are VERY efficient.

Compression, cams, cold air, carburetion mods, porting, exhaust systems, under-drive pulleys etc. are all fair game. Just avoid bling and a blower sticking out through the hood, and you will be fine. Heck, headers are fine if you paint them cast iron grey. The techs are the testing stations are not car guys, so it must be pretty obvious before they will start complaining. They are very reasonable, but if you rub their nose in it, well, your life will be a lot less fun.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-23 06:09 PM by Darth V8R.

JGug1 Avatar
JGug1 James Guglielmino
Mission, KS, USA   USA
By now, I can't remember how I became interested in a John's Cars swap. For some odd reason, I am attracted to trying to get more out of a car than it originally provided and as I read about the V6 swap into the much demeaned TR7, I became quite interested. So, when I found a car for a reasonable price, I bought it with the intention of driving it a bit while I accumulated the parts and then doing a V6/T5 swap. I was disappointed when it turned out that the car needed a head gasket but...undeterred, I muddled forward with my shade tree guy. I have certain talents, but doing a swap is not among them. So, I have looked for people who could do it but at a pace that might allow me to be part of the process. The guy who was working on my car had done some repairs for me on other cars and I knew he had built his own cars, so I went with him. It was a mistake.
He did find a 3.8 Olds and a proper T5 Transmission. We had the 3.8 overhauled but not assembled by the shop. Big mistake. He did a lousy job of assembling the engine and while it pulled like crazy, it also became obvious that it had a knock.....very early on. Beyond that, with the TR7 rear end, 1st gear was pretty much useless. By that time, I had gotten to the point where I knew he wasn't the answer. While the engine had been out, I asked someone he knew to detail the engine bay. Matt Pluff is his name and he did a beautiful job. I found that he had a part time restoration shop and soon opened his own shop. So, I got the car to him. We pulled the engine and opened it up. Yup, a bearing had rotated. The crank was going to have to be turned again....or? Matt suggested that we get a crate engine and that we look at the 4.1 that was used in big Buicks and Cadillacs. So we did that. We also put in a hydraulic clutch instead of the cable, a HUGE improvement. But, we still had the problem with the TR7 rear end. I constantly have several projects and of course, I wasn't his only client, so things slowed down. Eventually, we got a proper Mustang rear end with the Ford limited slip and disc brakes. All of this transitioning was more complicated than a simple swap and go, of course. And I kept trying to do more. I had found and purchased a set of heated, powered seats from a Nissan 350Z and those had to be modified to fit. I also have little affinity with the TR7 dash so we decided to redo it. Then, there was the desire to add powered mirrors. So, that is where we are right now, the drive line is completed (had to modify the drive shaft) and the carb rebuilt after sitting for so long, all the old gas drained and new gas put in. A partial new dash was designed. The gauges in the TR7 are truly awful, so the drivers' panel is new. It wasn't done as of last week but the gauges are in and they are quite nice. I'm stuck with the rest of the dash. It is hardly a sports car dash but I am going to live with it. Oh, the car has a condenser for A/C and at some point, I'put the compressor that I bought on. It really should be quite a nice touring car BUT.....there is no room for my dog so unless I fall in lust with it, I doubt that I will keep it forever. I have a Nissan 300ZX that works with the dog (yuk.....hair all over but I do love the beast) I'm thinking of building a Mustang with a turbo 2.3 Ford 4 cylinder. That should be fun and will have room for the dog. Honestly, I think I get more fun from the build even though I pay to have it done than I do from driving them.
I have included a sampling of pictures. The one with the blue engine in the bay is the old Olds 3.8. I am still using the Eldebrock intake and 4 barrel but I am thinking a bit of fuel injection. What the heck, it's only another 3k, Right?

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

Attachments:
'85 Olds Installation.jpg    64.7 KB
'85 Olds Installation.jpg

TR75-12-15A.jpg    34.7 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
TR7 Undercarriage.JPG    37.3 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
Polishing TR7-5-12-15.jpg    58.7 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
Andrew1966 Andrew Ward
Abbotsford, BC, Canada   CAN
Triumph never made a 6 cylinder TR7. They only came with a 4 cylinder unit. Therefore this car is far from original and the price should reflect that

Dan B Dan Blackwood
South Charleston, WV, USA   USA
In reply to # 1509185 by Andrew1966 Triumph never made a 6 cylinder TR7. They only came with a 4 cylinder unit. Therefore this car is far from original and the price should reflect that
So the price should increase, since it is a more reliable, more powerful, more efficient and more drivable?

JGug1 Avatar
JGug1 James Guglielmino
Mission, KS, USA   USA
ANDREW, that point was made very early on in the thread:-)
My experience with all the V conversions (V8 MGB, V6 MGcool smiley is that if they are well done, even VERY well done, they won't get more than 20 K. For that matter, Mark Macy told me about my TR4 restoration that it would cost about $100,000 and be worth .50c on the dollar. It does seem that primo restored TR4's are going for about 50K, so Mark knew what he was talking about. Mine sits in my garage, yet unlicensed because I have to take it to Olathe for inspection by a specialist. It has about 200 miles on it though the odometer says about 800 (I have no idea why). Anyone want to give me $100K for it?:-) Just kidding......I wouldn't take that for my dog, either.
JG



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-23 02:38 PM by JGug1.


Attachments:
Jack.jpg    83.9 KB
Jack.jpg

Tommys4 Thomas G
Ojai, Calif., USA   USA
Some years ago a customer came into my shop , he wanted a 3.8 Buick in his 79 TR7. I used the John's cars conversion kit , very nice. I told him to get a 1979 engine and manual trans, he came back with a 1980
engine and a TH350......ACK.....This was So.Cal. So 5 speeds were hard to come by. The car turned out nice. Driving down the Freeway at 4K rpms or so got tiring so he sold the car. The kid who purchased the car
came up with the 5 speed ,so I put that in, much better car.
TMG

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, CA, USA   USA
James,

Wow, you are nothing if not tenacious! Thanks for the pics and taking the time to tell the story about your experience with the John's Cars V6 swap.

darrellwalker Darrell Walker
Vancouver, WA, USA   USA
1966 Triumph TR4A "Christy"
1981 Triumph TR8 "Kate"
In reply to # 1509160 by JGug1 I am still using the Eldebrock intake and 4 barrel but I am thinking a bit of fuel injection. What the heck, it's only another 3k, Right?

You might look as some of the TBI systems, they are around 1K these days. I have the FiTech on my TR8 engine, and while there are a few things new to learn, it is much more flexible than a carb as far as tuning.



Darrell Walker
66 TR4A IRS-SC CTC67956L
81 TR8 SATPZ458XBA406206
Vancouver, WA, USA

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions




Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster