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Drive shaft shield

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Pat.L Avatar
Pat.L Patrick Ledford
New Wilmington, PA, USA   USA
I was under the TR8 today getting ready to change the exhaust when I noticed score marks on the driveshaft. I notice an aluminum shield above the driveshaft which is between the driveshaft and the floor. It is loose and just sitting on top of the mufflers.

I could see where if the car bottomed out it could rub on this shield. What is its use. It doesn't seem thick or strong enough to stop damage from a detached drive shaft. If it is suppose to be there is it supposed to be attached somehow?



Patrick
1980 TR8 DHC TPVDV8AT209637
1957 TR-3 Under restoration TS20462LO
Western Pennsylvania Triumph Association
North Coast Triumph Association
TWOA

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Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, OR, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1526504 by Pat.L I was under the TR8 today getting ready to change the exhaust when I noticed score marks on the driveshaft. I notice an aluminum shield above the driveshaft which is between the driveshaft and the floor. It is loose and just sitting on top of the mufflers.

I could see where if the car bottomed out it could rub on this shield. What is its use. It doesn't seem thick or strong enough to stop damage from a detached drive shaft. If it is suppose to be there is it supposed to be attached somehow?

It is not aluminum, but rather it is some sort of press board material painted with aluminum paint.

Because it is a silver color, I assumed it was intended to be some sort of heat shield to keep from coming up through the drive tunnel. And yes, it fastens to the underside of the car.

As to how necessary it is, I can't really say, but I did remove and reinstall mine as part of the restoration. It is really rather fragile, and so attempting to flex it during the removal process will result in it breaking. I washed and repainted mine before reinstalling it.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

sbs Avatar
sbs Steve S
In reply to # 1526591 by Darth V8R
It is not aluminum, but rather it is some sort of press board material painted with aluminum paint.
...
It is really rather fragile, and so attempting to flex it during the removal process will result in it breaking.


That description sounds worrisomely like asbestos.

Be careful out there.

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sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, CA, USA   USA
Steve,

Not to worry, asbestos was long gone from cars by the mid '70s. However, I have a '58 A/H that still has the original asbestos heat shields in the engine compartment.

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, OR, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1526651 by sliproc Steve,

Not to worry, asbestos was long gone from cars by the mid '70s. However, I have a '58 A/H that still has the original asbestos heat shields in the engine compartment.

I am surprised that the people's republic of California has not sent out a hazmat team to confiscate the car and bury it in a landfill somewhere. All the while telling you "...it is for your protection".

Tell me, have you broken out in cancerous tumors since driving that car? confused smiley

Didn't think so...

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

sliproc Avatar
sliproc Kevin Quistberg E
Long Beach, CA, USA   USA
Vance,

I'm sure if California knew it contained asbestos they would have come for it long ago. While the mention of asbestos seems to create a frenzy these days I've always found that generally speaking like a Moray Eel as long as you don't go poking it with a stick it's pretty harmless.

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, OR, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1526676 by sliproc Vance,

I'm sure if California knew it contained asbestos they would have come for it long ago. While the mention of asbestos seems to create a frenzy these days I've always found that generally speaking like a Moray Eel as long as you don't go poking it with a stick it's pretty harmless.

The concern stemmed from a correlation between certain types of lung disease and long term exposure to asbestos. The 'exposure' in this case meant inhalation of the particles, typically in the work environment. Ship workers from the second world war were very subject to it, but they worked literally in clouds of particles as the ship was being spray coated with asbestos while other workers carried on in the immediate vicinity.

Since then, black lung disease (long term inhalation of coal dust) , silicosis (long term inhalation of silica) and pneumoconiosis (long term inhalation of any sort of particulate) have all been identified as lung pathologies in addition to asbestosis. So it seems if you inhale anything over long periods of time (including cigarette smoke) your lungs are going to blow chunks. Shocking. Simply shocking.

This means that asbestos is no more dangerous (and no less dangerous) than anything else you might inhale, but the mere mention of asbestos causes fear and loathing, along with knee jerk condemnation from many.

So, wear a dust mask when working with anything that is going to emit particulate (head porting, brake jobs, painting) and you will be fine.

BTW, I just sent a note to the California EPA informing them of your wanton disregard of public health by driving that Austin and the resulting clouds of carcinogenic asbestos particles. The Hazmat team will be there momentarily. spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

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Pat.L Avatar
Pat.L Patrick Ledford
New Wilmington, PA, USA   USA
With the mufflers out of the way I could see that it was held with pop rivets and all four were broken. No problem to reattach.

In reply to # 1526591 by Darth V8R
In reply to # 1526504 by Pat.L I was under the TR8 today getting ready to change the exhaust when I noticed score marks on the driveshaft. I notice an aluminum shield above the driveshaft which is between the driveshaft and the floor. It is loose and just sitting on top of the mufflers.

I could see where if the car bottomed out it could rub on this shield. What is its use. It doesn't seem thick or strong enough to stop damage from a detached drive shaft. If it is suppose to be there is it supposed to be attached somehow?

It is not aluminum, but rather it is some sort of press board material painted with aluminum paint.

Because it is a silver color, I assumed it was intended to be some sort of heat shield to keep from coming up through the drive tunnel. And yes, it fastens to the underside of the car.

As to how necessary it is, I can't really say, but I did remove and reinstall mine as part of the restoration. It is really rather fragile, and so attempting to flex it during the removal process will result in it breaking. I washed and repainted mine before reinstalling it.

Vance



Patrick
1980 TR8 DHC TPVDV8AT209637
1957 TR-3 Under restoration TS20462LO
Western Pennsylvania Triumph Association
North Coast Triumph Association
TWOA

sbs Avatar
sbs Steve S
In reply to # 1526651 by sliproc Steve,

Not to worry, asbestos was long gone from cars by the mid '70s.


On the contrary asbestos was rampant in cars in the mid 70s.

Asbestos was still widely used in cars sold in the US through the 80s. It was briefly banned from 89-91. It's still legal today and often found in aftermarket parts.

The late-70s MGBs have asbestos tunnel heat shields. I haven't looked at the wedge heat shield but it seems likely that BL used similar materials in our cars.

The online searchable part of the "Original Triumph TR7" book mentions use of asbestos in the wedge exhaust system.


https://www.epa.gov/asbestos/us-federal-bans-asbestos

https://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?1,3271403

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rainking1958 Avatar
rainking1958 Randy Scott
Green, OH, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Kermit"
1979 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "The Runt"
1980 Triumph TR7 Drophead
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
The rectangle heat shields in the gas tank on the 8 are asbestos. Or contain such. I have a testing kit and they tested positive. Considering replacing it all with aluminum
Randy

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, OR, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1527186 by rainking1958 The rectangle heat shields in the gas tank on the 8 are asbestos. Or contain such. I have a testing kit and they tested positive. Considering replacing it all with aluminum
Randy

I forgot about those. I painted and reinstalled those too. I am so going to die. eye popping smiley

Thanks for bringing this up. Not.

Now I am waiting for cancerous lumps to appear on my private parts....

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, navy blue interior
Bare metal respray, Crower cam, raised compression
ported heads, modified Zenith carbs, 0.060" overbore

rainking1958 Avatar
rainking1958 Randy Scott
Green, OH, USA   USA
1977 MG MGB "Kermit"
1979 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "The Runt"
1980 Triumph TR7 Drophead
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
I still have all the stock heat shields on my driver. I am rebuilding/restoring another and have considered aluminum replacements when reassembling. I may just put the old back on. If it hasn’t killed me yet...
Randy

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