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"D type" overdrive wiring schematic

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heraldvitesse Avatar
heraldvitesse Wayne McGill,
Oakville, ON, Canada   CAN
Hi Mike. Please send me some pictures of what you have. Is it just the overdrive unit, or the entire transmission and attached overdrive? As was previously stated by Tony, the addition of an overdrive to a stock transmission is not a simple bolt on operation. The main shafts are different and this requires: A) obtaining the correct overdrive main shaft, and cool smiley the complete tear down and re-assembly of the transmission in order to install the overdrive unit. I've attached a photo of both a stock and "D" type overdrive for comparison.

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Attachments:
Herald transmission 002.JPG    36 KB
Herald transmission 002.JPG

Euclid64 Avatar
Euclid64 Mike B
Scottsdale, AZ, USA   USA
ok, Wayne, took pics tonight. Was replacing the rear spring, after Diff rebuild ( 4:11 gear ratio). So took me a while to get the OD uncovered and take some pics..

not to pretty pics, but you can see it seems to be a full D type OD. I have the part number of the little box on the side., if you are interested. ( can send tomorrow, after work)

This week, I am putting in Dot 5 brake fluid and then what to check out the diff with some road tests. It will be too hot to do much driving in about 30 to 60 days. That is when the desert goes up to 100 degrees F. during the day and only cools to 80 F at night. Stays like that until, about Oct. then drops down to 90 and 80s. Thought would work on cleaning the trans, buying a few parts and the installing while it is too hot to drive.
thank you for your thoughts and advise. .


Attachments:
Od trans pic 4-16-18 a.jpg    55.8 KB
Od trans pic 4-16-18 a.jpg

Od trans pic 4-16-18 b.jpg    55.2 KB
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IMG_0211.JPG    37.1 KB
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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
Is that a rear anti roll bar?

Check and set the O/D solenoid linkage settings befor you install the transmission.

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heraldvitesse Avatar
heraldvitesse Wayne McGill,
Oakville, ON, Canada   CAN
OK, so I am jealous! Must be nice to work on clean "rust free" sheet metal. I'm just kidding as my Herald is actually in pretty good condition (exceptional for an eastern Canadian car). I now understand what you are working with and a complete transmission makes the job a whole lot easier. Your two main issues now are where to install the relay and getting a correct length driveshaft. Funny that your "driving season" is the exact reverse of mine. I take my cars off the road in October and put them back on the road in April due to snow and #######salt!. Our first "event" of the season is this Sunday, but as of today, there is still ice and snow on our roads and lots of the #######salt. It is a few degrees below freezing here this morning. Please send heat! I've attached a photo of the location that I chose to mount my relay. There was already one hole with a "u-clip" installed. It might have been the original factory location for the turn signal bi-metalic switch.


Attachments:
029.JPG    29.8 KB
029.JPG

Euclid64 Avatar
Euclid64 Mike B
Scottsdale, AZ, USA   USA
For Tony Can you explain more about the "Check and set the O/D solenoid linkage settings befor you install the transmission".

I am hoping someone in the club has a home Trans tester, we had one in the Chicago Triumph Club.
I was like a Trans Dolly, with a big electric motor. We could bolt down the trans, attach a pully to the front of the trans, and the electric motor. Turn on the motor the switch
gears in the Trans, to check if all the gears are working. then we could check od to see if the solenoid was working.
Put power to the solenoid and see the the revs at the rear of the trans increase speed.That is my plan, also have to shorten the drive shaft.

On the rear sway bar, will have to take some pictures. I had a Spritfire Rear Bar and could not figure out how to fit it. By chance I had an old Chrysler La Baron front Sway bar I
had bought but never installed. must have been in mid eighties. When Lee Iacocca was working with Shelby on some specialty Chrysler products.
Anyway i put some brackets and sized the bar and it fit. I did have to have some small fitting that bolt to the end of the bottom of the shock. i will send pictures.
i also have some pics of John Davies ,Vitesse, rear sway bar, which is designed for racing. My is not for racing, but really makes a hugh difference in cornering.


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Rear ARB side 640x480.jpg    34.5 KB
Rear ARB side 640x480.jpg

heraldvitesse Avatar
heraldvitesse Wayne McGill,
Oakville, ON, Canada   CAN
I found this article in the December 2017 issue of Practical Classics. Maybe this is what Tony meant when talking about the solenoid adjustment.


Attachments:
overdrive solenoid adjustment.pdf    724.9 KB

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
Thank you Wayne. This is from the manual if it is readable?

Dispite the magazine articles oil recomendations, modern MTL's (manual Transmission Lubes) have been found to work very well with overdrive units, and really do improve syncromesh opperation.

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IMG_20180418_084147.jpg    49.1 KB
IMG_20180418_084147.jpg

heraldvitesse Avatar
heraldvitesse Wayne McGill,
Oakville, ON, Canada   CAN
I am certainly no chemical engineer, but the overdrive unit uses the principal of a "wet" clutch (bathed in oil). I have been advised and also read that modern synthetic oils and additives should not be used in overdrive units. The reasoning is that synthetic oil has similarly sized molecules and crude has different sized molecules. Synthetic may be "too slippery" and over time damage the clutch lining as can additives. Besides, crude sourced oil is relatively inexpensive. My TR-6 that I bought new in 1973 came with a "J' type overdrive filled with 90 wt and after 45 years and more that 100,000 miles it has never been apart. The "D' type that I've installed in my Herald came to me with non-detergent 30 wt, so I'll stick with that and report if I have any issues.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
Certainty lubrication additives have come to play a big roll in what is suitible (and what is not) for our engines and drivetrains in the past 20 years or so.
It is because of these (mainly EP or Extream Pressure) additives that many of the traditional brand/type lubricants are no longer ideal for our 'Old School' cars.

For example, it is commonly known that the now common GL5 rated gear lubes (unless sufficently buffered) may have derogatory effects on yellow metal thrust washers or syncro rings.
As a result many owners fall back to using a similar viscosity engine oil in therir transmissions to avoild these effects.
But unfortunately, modern motor oils have also changed. For instance, where once a Zinc/phosphorous compound (ZDDP) was abundantly used as a EP additive, it is now very much restricted for use in engines because of it's poisoning effects on the exhaust systems catalytic converter.
ZDDP also happened to be an effective Friction Modifier (allowing syncro rings for instance to grip) when used in a gear oil. BUT! some of the additives used as a replacment for some of the zinc and Phosphorous compound (like Molybdenum disulfide and Boron) do NOT work at all well in a syncromesh transmission.
The Brand names may remain the same, the formulations are different.

It is partly because of these changes and deficiencies conventional lubricants that Manual Transmission Lubes (MTL's) were developed. These lubes are specifically formulated to provide sufficent friction for syncro rings to do their job, yetprotect the gear train from wear.
MTL's are not necessarily classed as synthetic. In fact the very term Synthetic is somewhat meaningless and in North America is really little more than a marketing term.

Virtually ALL so called synthetic motor oils you will see today are in fact refined from crude oil!
Degrees of Hydrocracking crude 'Dino' can produce very high quality oil base stock, that can virtually replicate the quality of oils that previously could only be synthethized.
You could in fact argue that ANY oil that meets the current SAE API motor oil requirments could be classed as 'synthetic' by legal definition.

I don't wish to ramble, But the point I am making is: We cannont (as older car owners) assume that the lubricants we have recognised as being suitable in the past, are still suitable for our cars today!
The brands that we were using 40-50 years ago may still be around, but the product sold under that brand name is almost certainly (for better or worse) very differant.

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Euclid64 Avatar
Euclid64 Mike B
Scottsdale, AZ, USA   USA
I like the picture of the OD adjustments. I am attaching some additional pics for comment. Also sending a pic of the diff and trans. fluid I am using. Also running Dot 5, if you noticed I took off a lot of paint around the firewall with dot 4. We have hardly any humidity or rain here, so don't worry about the brake fluid picking up moisture, but don't like repainting the firewall. I think I have done it 2 in the past.


Attachments:
Firewall 4-18-18 Elect Ignition, and new fuse box..jpg    56.1 KB
Firewall 4-18-18 Elect Ignition, and new fuse box..jpg

Sport 6 Diff Oil and Brake Fluid.4-20-18.jpg    54 KB
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