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What did you do with your TR6 today?

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smaceng Avatar
smaceng Scott Macdonald
Martinez, CA, USA   USA
like Mike, I installed the windshield and the finisher today. My tips......soaked the gasket in very hot water for about 1/2 hour. Lubed up the windshield frame with detergent. Installed the 1/8" diameter rope so the start was at the bottom. Kept pushing the windshield down while the string was pulled. The finisher went in very easily, used a flat plastic tool to open up the slot, and a rubber mallet to easily pound the trim into place. I left the finisher connector piece off for now, waiting to see if shrinkage raises its ugly head!
Cheers,
Scott in CA

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Thunderinjp Avatar
Thunderinjp John Inch
Glace Bay, NS, Canada   CAN
1973 Triumph TR6 "Little Red"
Good tips; thanks for sharing . . .

Krom Avatar
Krom Paul K
San Rafael, CA, USA   USA
Can't blame the prior owner...having the car for the past forty years, I'm to blame. Heard rotational noise from right rear on cornering especially. Was not particularly excited about putting the car on jackstands and rolling around underneath for diagnosis. But, did so and ending up pulling the wheel and brake drum. Kind of glad I did as some fool (I'm really the only on working on this car) neglected to install a pin and retaining clip on the rear brake shoe. The bright side of this is that no damage is apparent and somehow, I had the prescience to have spare pins and clips from a prior TRF order on the shelf. A good excuse for cleaning up the right rear, greasing the sliding axles, checking tightness on the drive shafts, lubing ujoints, and while I'm filthy, lubing the upper ball joints and trunnions on the front end. The other bright side of this is that even though much of the country is freezing, it seems like a fine idea to take a top-down cruise over the Golden Gate Bridge today.

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Thunderinjp Avatar
Thunderinjp John Inch
Glace Bay, NS, Canada   CAN
1973 Triumph TR6 "Little Red"
In reply to # 1507446 by Krom The other bright side of this is that even though much of the country is freezing, it seems like a fine idea to take a top-down cruise over the Golden Gate Bridge today.

Yeah!! Well --- piss off . . . LOL

nync Avatar
nync Glenn Meteer
Charlotte, NC, USA   USA
It was warm today in Charlotte so I checked out the persistent oil dribble off the front of the engine on the 69' TR6. Turns out every screw and bolt on the timing chain cover was loose. So I tightened them to snug, all good so far. I got to the very bottom screwhead bolt last and all it did was turn, not tightening. Crap! I figured the block was stripped, worse case. So I removed the screwhead bolt (by hand!) and it was just less than 1/2", no metal in the threads.
I checked a diagram of the area and it looked like that spot calls for a fine thread 5/16 "x7/8" bolt. I went to my local ACE hardware and got a 5/16" (grade 8) 3/4" bolt. (no 7/8 available). I screwed it in and after a bit finished tightening it up, plenty of threads for the new bolt to grab onto. Dodged a major bullet on this one! The fix would have required pulling the bottom pulley off and the radiator, etc to get to the hole to install a helicoil. Tomorrow we check for the oil leak.

w147ik Avatar
w147ik Heinrich Koncki
George, Western Cape, South Africa   ZAF
1963 Morris Mini Traveller "Moritz"
2001 BMW Z3 "Wife's Car"
Not much hope unfortunately that it does not lek again, because:
- oil is already between cover and block and as long you don't take it off and clean both sides thoroughly, use a new gasket and sealant, oil will seep through after a while.
- the bottom bolt goes in the aluminum closing block and usually the thread gets stripped. Either rebore to next bigger size but use UNC or get a helicoil.

Been there done that. You might be lucky. Took me 10 years and 3 cars (2 fourcylinder TR's and a TR6) to finally have a non-dripping engine.
On the TR6 I used no gasket except on the water pump and the rocker cover of course, but a modern silicone sealant and let it cure for at least 48 hours before starting the engine.

nync Avatar
nync Glenn Meteer
Charlotte, NC, USA   USA
Heinrich, thanks for the reply and good information. I hadn't considered the saturated gasket still leaking. Hmmm. Maybe the drip will go from ridiculous to just annoying! Also, I didn't realize the closing block was aluminum.

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gr8britt Avatar
gr8britt Andrew Blood
Grimsby, ON, Canada   CAN
I would change that closing block for a steel one, no more stripped threads. thumbs up

Andy


In reply to # 1508766 by nync Heinrich, thanks for the reply and good information. I hadn't considered the saturated gasket still leaking. Hmmm. Maybe the drip will go from ridiculous to just annoying! Also, I didn't realize the closing block was aluminum.

TomChar Avatar
TomChar Silver Member Tom Coulter
Springfield, PA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1507446 by Krom Kind of glad I did as some fool (I'm really the only on working on this car) neglected to install a pin and retaining clip on the rear brake shoe. The bright side of this is that no damage is apparent and somehow
I had the same issue after rebuilding my rear brake assemblies, although it wasn't while driving. It was during reassembly, I couldn't get the clips to hold well enough while putting everything else back together. It just looked so iffy to me. I went digging through my pile of old brake stuff I had collected over the years, and found some American style (Bendix) brake shoe retainer nails and spring clips that fit. Have no idea what they're from, but I'm thinking '85 Chevette based on the toolbox I found them in. Much happier with those.
In reply to # 1507446 by Krom The other bright side of this is that even though much of the country is freezing, it seems like a fine idea to take a top-down cruise over the Golden Gate Bridge today.
Last Friday we popped up to 60°F here in the Philly area, and while overcast and rainy at times, I dragged my car out from under her covers in the garage for a quick top down run to the store. Had to hose off the salt before putting her away again, but worth the smiles! grinning smiley



Tom
1974 TR6 CF24871UO. Dual Weber MCHH carbs.

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YTJOHN Avatar
YTJOHN Silver Member John F
Yorktown, NY, USA   USA
It's warming up even in the Hudson River Valley, but the roads are coated with salt. Time to put this LBC up on blocks for the winter and some maintenance on the brakes.


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Damson1971 Mike L
Orlando, FL, USA   USA
Well I have done a lot this week. Sent off my water pump for a rebuild and 5 fin impeller install, sent of my two carbs for rebuild and restoration, stopped by the restoration shop to schedule the drop off hopefully by the end of the month for the frame off restoration and body work. Last week bought a reconditioned 1971 block, crank and head from a shop in Michigan. Now I need a road trip to go get it in April sometime I think. Far too cold to head up north from Florida to get these.

wsquared Warren W
Olathe, KS, USA   USA
Yesterday, joined ten other hardy souls in 1 degree wind chill weather to pose our Triumphs under the Victoria British HQ sign in Lenexa, KS, to mark Sir John Black's birthday on "Drive Your Triumph Day."

Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, AL, USA   USA
Actually this was earlier this week, but I pulled the engine and tranny and stored it safely in the barn on a rack made of 2x4s. I bought a second hand lift that fits on the 3 point hitch of my tractor and connected the lifting eyes to a strap, raised the lift handle and eased it up and out, and drove off to the barn. This is the easiest engine/tranny pull I’ve ever done and it was a one man job. I don’t think I would try an install with this setup, but the pulling was easy!
Rut

DerekM Avatar
DerekM Silver Member Derek McAllister
Toronto, ON, Canada   CAN
Yesterday I met my mechanic 1/2 way between his shop and my home (he's a nice guy), picked up my '74 after some frame repairs, and drove it 30 mins home in Toronto on Feb 27th!! Unseasonably warm 13 C / 55 F for a couple of days before the snow flies again...



Derek McAllister
Toronto, Ontario
1974 TR6 Sapphire Blue/Shadow Blue


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Damson1971 Mike L
Orlando, FL, USA   USA
Not so much what I'm doing today, just gathering parts, but tomorrow I'm hauling her down to the body shop to drop her off. Frame off, stripping paint, metal work and new paint. From white to Damson the original color. Probably take a number of months since this shop has a lot of work. But it will be worth it. Can't wait to get it back so I can start assembling it. He's just going to do the body work and paint.

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