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Steering Tool
#1
  This topic is about my 1975 Triumph TR6
Doc250 Avatar
Doc250 Chris Holliday
Honeoye Falls, NY, USA   USA
1968 Triumph TR250 "Little Red One"
1975 Triumph TR6 "Lbc II"
Anyone out there have or know someone who has the tool used to spread the steering rack U bolts? It is listed as S 341 in the back of the Bentley book. I'm looking to re-manufacture one and would like one to copy and get dimensions off of. None of my local sources have one.

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titanic Berry P
Albany, OR, USA   USA
I think most people just improvise, vise grips or whatever. Here is a link showing some parallel woodworking clamps-http://bullfire.net/TR6/TR6-33/TR6-33.html
You might find many of the articles in the link helpful. Ed has done an excellent job of documenting and photographing most of the repair/restoration procedures on TR6s.
Berry

Doc250 Avatar
Doc250 Chris Holliday
Honeoye Falls, NY, USA   USA
1968 Triumph TR250 "Little Red One"
1975 Triumph TR6 "Lbc II"
Thanks Berry,
I agree that use of the wood clamps is both ingenious and effective. However, the body if off and there is plenty of room for the large clamps. The use of smaller clamps wound be required with body on. I have used clamps with a modicum of success but I was trying do a better job with the proper tool. I believe it would tighten the steering play and result in a better feel in the steering.

The search goes on.

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rjc157 Avatar
rjc157 ralph c
pearl river, NY, USA   USA
Get rid of them and the rubber and install RG aluminum rack ones a world of difference

barcalude Dave B
Baldwinsville, NY, USA   USA
I just use a couple different sized chisels. The tips are wedge shaped and easily open the gap without damage.

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
FWIW, I've used a single wood clamp, in the car, with good success. Take it apart and turn the jaws around (so it is a spreader rather than a clamp). ISTR I also tapped the plates a bit to help them slide. Made a big difference in my buddy's steering.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

chris Avatar
chris Platinum Member Chris Roop
Pendleton, OR, USA   USA
What's the purpose of this? What happens if you just slip the poly pieces in and tighten them down?



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BigChill Avatar
BigChill Silver Member Big Chill
Norwood, MA, USA   USA
I've been told that you can just fix one side in place, then turn the steering wheel to the oposite side to force the bushing to the correct depth. You need an assistant.

I plan to use this procedure myself the next day or two.



Big Chill

'75 TR6 slowly coming back from the dead...

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TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
My buddy had stock rubber rather than poly, and the steering rack was clearly moving sideways under cornering forces. Steering felt sluggish and vague.

Poly would probably reduce the effect, but my guess is that you would still get some lost motion.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

BigChill Avatar
BigChill Silver Member Big Chill
Norwood, MA, USA   USA
One time, my TR4 developed "vague" steering. Very similar setup. The mechanic who took care of me then put a piece of inner tube under the rubber bushing to shim it. When I took my TR6 rack off, I found the rubber bushings had this shim.



Big Chill

'75 TR6 slowly coming back from the dead...

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chris Avatar
chris Platinum Member Chris Roop
Pendleton, OR, USA   USA
That was what I was going with also until reading here about a tool, hence the question what would happen if. So what is the point of this compression? What does it accomplish?



Used parts are negotiable; they look better on your car than in my shop.


Member Services:
Used English car parts.
BigChill Avatar
BigChill Silver Member Big Chill
Norwood, MA, USA   USA
The point is to lock the steering rack into the frame tightly. When you are cornering, the forces on the steering rack are significant.



Big Chill

'75 TR6 slowly coming back from the dead...

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
The rack mounts in rubber bushings (as original). There are flanges that keep it from sliding sideways through the bushings. The bushings in turn are held by metal blocks and U-bolts, that go through slots so they can be positioned sideways. The tool is to hold the metal blocks out so the rubber is compressed against the flanges on the rack, while you tighten the U-bolts. The compressed rubber means it takes a lot more force (steering effort) before the rack starts to move; as well as limiting how far it can move.

Here's a drawing of the factory tool. Sorry, I don't have the dimensions (nor a TR6 handy)




Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
In reply to # 1533571 by BigChill I've been told that you can just fix one side in place, then turn the steering wheel to the oposite side to force the bushing to the correct depth. You need an assistant.

I plan to use this procedure myself the next day or two.
Yeah, better than nothing. Half a loaf so to speak, as you can only compress one side.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

Doc250 Avatar
Doc250 Chris Holliday
Honeoye Falls, NY, USA   USA
1968 Triumph TR250 "Little Red One"
1975 Triumph TR6 "Lbc II"
Randall Y
I've seen this drawing and referenced this tool no. way back in the beginning of this post. My only problem is I can't figure out how it even works. I can only assume it has to be turned upside down from the way it is pictured to turn the bolt and spread the two L shaped blocks. If true, I can start to fashion how to fabricate a tool.

Many responders offered alternative methods to spread this rubber or poly bushings. Some I've tried other I have have not. While these suggestions are helpful its not the question. The original factor tool will yield the best (ie tightest) steering with the factor bushings. While poly bushings are presented as an up grade I must confess I'm not sure of the benefit of the poly. There is no difference as far as I can tell to spreading poly bushings vs rubber bushings. I even have a set of poly installed in my TR6 but there is still play because the bushing are not tight against frame. Hence, my search for the elusive "tool".

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