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Newest Addtion to my stable - TR6 - barn find

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allzway Avatar
allzway James P
Paris, TX, USA   USA
This is sort of a barn find, although I have known about it for many years. The step father of the owner of the company I work had bought this car from a college professor back apparently in the late 70's early 80's and sparingly drove it until his passing or loss of interest (still piecing this together) and it has been parked in a warehouse the owner owns since 1991. He mostly collects what he calls big iron, old Cadillac's, Lincolns, etc.. and mostly from the 50's-60's so this car didn't fit his interest much.

He knew I had a few TR7's and decided to make a deal I couldn't refuse to take ownership of the TR6 ( I belive it is 1974 model.. not title yet.. it is lost.)


So... here it is in all it's glory seeing daylight for the first time in 25+ years. The hood is frozen shut so I haven't even gotten to peak under the hood yet.


Now.. Educate me on what I need to know first thing. I just completed a TR7 build for occasional street driving and I am real familiar with TR7's, but not so much about TR6's.







Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-14 12:07 PM by allzway.

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Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, AL, USA   USA
James,
Congratulations! That looks like an early TR6 to me and once you get the bonnet open you should be able to see the vin info.
Good luck, Rut

DerekM Avatar
DerekM Silver Member Derek McAllister
Toronto, ON, Canada   CAN
Based on bumpers and seats it looks like 70-72 range. Nice find!



Derek McAllister
Toronto, Ontario
1974 TR6 Sapphire Blue/Shadow Blue

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dicta dick Taylor
Downey, Callifornia, USA   USA
In reply to # 1502708 by allzway This is sort of a barn find, although I have known about it for many years. The step father of the owner of the company I work had bought this car from a college professor back apparently in the late 70's early 80's and sparingly drove it until his passing or loss of interest (still piecing this together) and it has been parked in a warehouse the owner owns since 1991. He mostly collects what he calls big iron, old Cadillac's, Lincolns, etc.. and mostly from the 50's-60's so this car didn't fit his interest much.

He knew I had a few TR7's and decided to make a deal I couldn't refuse to take ownership of the TR6 ( I belive it is 1974 model.. not title yet.. it is lost.)


So... here it is in all it's glory seeing daylight for the first time in 25+ years. The hood is frozen shut so I haven't even gotten to peak under the hood yet.


Now.. Educate me on what I need to know first thing. I just completed a TR7 build for occasional street driving and I am real familiar with TR7's, but not so much about TR6's.

No picture came thru to me...Others got it? Never mind. It showed up a bit late for me!

Dick






Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-14 02:56 PM by dicta.

gozto11 Avatar
gozto11 Todd Bermudez
Cincinnati, OH, USA   USA
In reply to # 1502711 by Perdido James,
Congratulations! That looks like an early TR6 to me and once you get the bonnet open you should be able to see the vin info.
Good luck, Rut

Uh unless it’s a 69, it’ll be on the B-post of the driver door. It could be a 69 to mid 72 based on the scuttle flap being there but some folks add those. Doesn’t quite look like Jasmine but it’s in the neighborhood

gozto11 Avatar
gozto11 Todd Bermudez
Cincinnati, OH, USA   USA
In reply to # 1502712 by DerekM Based on bumpers and seats it looks like 70-72 range. Nice find!

Bumper = 73. Sticks out farther than 69-72

allzway Avatar
allzway James P
Paris, TX, USA   USA
I found some paperwork and the vin from the window and it is a 1970 model.

I was also able to get the hood open. From the paint code inside the door of 55, I am guessing this is not the original color of the car. I haven't found any green paint anywhere yet though.


If you were going to attempt to get the engine running... what would your first steps be?

I know I will drain the fuel tank and blow through the fuel lines, but I know nothing about the dual carbs on the car.

The brake master cylinder is basically dry, so I am sure the wheel cylinders will have to be replaced.

The clutch master is also dry. I assume you have to replace the entire unit?

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triumph74tr6 Avatar
triumph74tr6 Chad Jester
Tulsa, OK, USA   USA
1964 Triumph Sports 6 "Speed 6"
1968 Triumph TR250 "Gene"
1971 Triumph GT6 MkIII "Ken"
1974 MG MGB GT "MiGiBiGiT"    & more
After sitting 25 years......renew ALL they hydraulics and run all new fuel line.

allzway Avatar
allzway James P
Paris, TX, USA   USA
In reply to # 1502819 by triumph74tr6 After sitting 25 years......renew ALL they hydraulics and run all new fuel line.

I definitely will be replacing all the brake lines and brake wheel cylinders. I would like to get the engine running as first step to decide if it the engine can be used.

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YankeeTR5 Dan M
Seattle, WA, USA   USA
Triumphs in general are pretty hardy cars and tend to come out of long term storage well. That said, what was common back in the 80's and 90's isn't so much anymore with another 20 years of sitting tacked on. If the motor turns by hand, your probably in good shape to pull the plugs and lubricate the cylinders with something like Marvel Mystery oil. Good top end lubricant, penetrant and all things snake oilish. Check for thrust washer wear - if its within spec great! If not its something you should address before driving, some may argue before even starting, but I'd at least try to hear the car running before taking on thrust washers. Next, I'd drop the oil pan just to inspect for major damage - like metal chunks- floating around and to give it a good cleaning. Whats in there is probably sludge and won't drain but will start to circulate thru your engine once iit gets warmed up. Once the oil is taken care of (new filter too) the next push is for the carbs. Manually operate the fuel pump. If it makes a slurping sound and offers some resistance when the lever is moved up and down you probably can get away without rebuilding it (the diaphragm is still pulling a vacuum so it will pump). Order a set of rebuild kits for the carbs (pretty cheap) or at the very least new diaphragms and replace those - very simple to do the rest can wait until after it starts. Drop the bottom "bowels" to see if they're gunky or reasonably dry. If dry, you're good to go but make sure the float needles are freely moving. If you pull the carbs to the rebuild kits are easy to install - most everything screws apart and most of the kit is gaskets and seals. Rebuild kits come with new float needles but some are more problems then cleaning up and reusing the old ones. Pull the plugs and clean them. After this I'd crank the engine over with coil wire unplugged until I got oil pressure then I'd go for it. The 70 is a good year. Smog plumbing is still simple, I believe you'll have the adjustable needles in the carbs (69 were fixed so a real pain if mixture is out). Again, these generally are pretty hardy cars. If it smokes, and it will, let things get warm before panicking. A good warm up cycle will allow things to loosen up and settle back in.
As to your hydraulics....if you've got white powder you're better off going with new but if you've got fluid or no white powder residue I'd probably rebuild whats there until I got the car back on the road just to see where the whole car has "landed". The hydraulics on these cars are cheap comparatively (just the front wheel cylinders on an old Alfa I'm wakening up after a 40 year slumber are $890!) for comparison and are quickly bolted off/bolted back on replacement. Your front disk calibers will most likely need rebuilding too - the pistons in the calibers always rust. Replacements fully rebuilt are readily available and, relatively, cheap.
Once you get it back on the road understand that after sitting for so long much of the suspension will be loose and you'll have many rattles and clunks from the rubber bushings being shot and wear settling in on things. They weren't like this "from the factory" and things quiet down considerably once bushings and other wear parts are replaced and things lubed up.
Nice car...nice color. Like the wires on it too. Too many chrome or repainted "bright silver" wires out there. The factory greyish color to me stands out without the need for bling. Use to find cars like this all the time...now not so much. Different experience then the TR7. These cars respond well to a mechanics touch. Its why they're great hobby cars. A little tinkering and things get better and add motivation to do the next job. Thanks for sharing and good luck with things...

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
Remove the spark plugs and squirt some Marvel Mystery Oil in each bore.
Try to turn the engine over by hand, or by pushing the car in 4th gear. If it is frozen, let it sit a day or two, then try again.

Remove the distributor and drive the oil pump directly with a counter clockwise running drill and adaptor* to circulate FRESH motor oil around the engine

Chances are the carbs will need to be disassembled and cleaned, but you could try pumping gas into them.

*Do a search priming engine oil.

allzway Avatar
allzway James P
Paris, TX, USA   USA
Great information guys... Hope to do a little work with it this weekend.

South San Frncisco, CA, USA   USA
Very interesting find...seeming at least intact. Even sitting in a dry place 25 years, everything on car tends to go to pieces.
Fuel tank likely needs cleaning big time... the carbs need cleaning, as the fuel in there has probably turned to glue...
Also, mind the wheel bearings. The rears ...on mine the grease dried out and the driver side failed, lucky not right on the road.
(replaced originals with Richard Good's replacement rear hubs and all the differential u joints (they feel VERY solid)
Mine sat 21 years... ended up having to go through every mechanical thing (mothballed at 29,000 miles, now has 36700)
Depending on the real mileage of your example, and how it was treated prior, you might find all in order, just needing attempts at prelube before starting. The advice of the posts you see is all relevant.

It would be wonderful if just a little TLC got the machine running at all, and give you a chance to evaluate it....
I would expect, as my experience, you will be going through every system on the car to make it right...
and it is worth doing... after beginning in 2012 to revive my 1974...running end 2014... has taken me until
late this summer to finally conquer it and it running right...time available and my own stubborness prevented
solving it all sooner. You will find the car to be a "blast" to drive when all is correct again, operating a real machine, not piloting a computer... If engine is not destroyed and if there is minimal rust... just evict the rodents from the interior and enjoy.
(oh, you'll be replacing foam in seats in short order, it turns to a fine powder...) should you have to pull engine for rebuild, don't lose heart... it is worth it when done... oh, and try avoiding temptation to "upgrade" everything in sight...
(on balance I think spin on oil filter adaptor is a good thing... don't rush to install the accessory external oil feed line for the rockers... and try sticking to original ignition and spark plug specs...until you have it all sorted out...at which time you could start mods, if inclined. if there were a way to evaluate rear hub condition and get the grease revived before roading again...you could perhaps stave off that issue. Front hub bearings are easy...sorry to prattle on...
Congratulations, (I think).
wes

gozto11 Avatar
gozto11 Todd Bermudez
Cincinnati, OH, USA   USA
Just to illustrate my point about front bumpers...

You can clearly see how the mounts are different between an early 69-72 and the 73-74

There is about 1/2” difference in depth.

Bottom of early is about 2.25”. Bottom of 73 2.75”

Todd


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Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, AL, USA   USA
James,
Great info in the library under awakening an mgb.
Rut
http://www.triumphexp.com/article/awakening-sleeping-mg.html

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