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My engine rebuild, step 297...

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
Reposition the adapter.

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barcalude Dave B
Baldwinsville, NY, USA   USA
Rotate the filter holder.

TR-PI Avatar
TR-PI Lee Cunningham
Sardis, BC, Canada   CAN
Can’t quite see by the picture, but the bleed screw must be in the upper most hole in the slave cylinder. You should be able to loosen the thru bolt for the filter adaptor and swing the filter assembly forward to give you the clearance needed

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Oh geez. Thank you thank you. Such a simple fix but it never dawned on me I could rotate the spin on adapter. Hot diggity!

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Great progress this weekend with a little help from the forums.

1. Clutch slave installed after slightly rotating the spin on oil filter adapter! Thanks everyone!
2. Installed Good Parts throttle shaft bushings. Worth every penny. Should have done it sooner.
3. Started to clean front calipers and tore the dust boot on the pistons. So I tore them all the way down and really cleaned them up. Ordered the caliper rebuild kit. Calipers are all clean and ready for reassembly.
4. Spent 30 minutes under the car trying to fasten the speedometer cable to the trans. Finally realized the screw cap was smashed during engine removal. I seem to recall that happening (2 years ago... or was it 3?). I pulled the cable off the car and tried to fix the problem but I only made it worse, In the end I wasted 2 hours, and deformed the connector and stripped the threads. The replacement part is $20. So I ordered it, and moving on...
5. Ran the engine long enough for my radiator fan to turn on. It sounds good. I can't wait to drive it. I plugged in my new air flow meters into the carbs and discovered one meter is 'sticky' and doesn't register correctly. Hrm. After playing around I discovered that one carb is sucking really hard and the other is not. Measured at 2 Kg/hr on one, and 10 Kg/hr on the other at (slightly fast) idle of 1000-1200 RPM. I can feel a huge difference in air flow just putting my fingers near the face of the carbs. I need more time. I suppose it's as simple as un-synched idle set screws. Other thoughts?

I can actually test drive it right after I:
1. rebuild brake calipers
2. install brake clipers
3. bleed brakes and clutch
4. install front seat(s).

Triumphgt6er Avatar
Triumphgt6er Jim Snell
Cave Creek, AZ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Bubbles"
Curious what fan you're using.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1507748 by Triumphgt6er Curious what fan you're using.

Well, I can't do anything the easy way...
I wanted an electric fan because the stock fan can really and truly suck HP away from the engine at high RPM. I took my radiator in to a shop to have a temp sensor braised into the bottom. He did a free pressure test and blew holes in my old radiator. I wasn't too upset. When I would shake the old radiator over my head (yes really) it sounded like a maraca. Full of rust! I sourced a '73 radiator for my '76. Pressure tested A-OK and had a temp sensor installed at the bottom. I spent many hours trying to determine a good way to mount the radiator fan but finally I just used the stock, plastic zip-tie like connectors that pass through the grill.

I'm running a 14" fan from summit racing with a relay to control switching. It's quiet and moves a lot more air than the stock fan.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-15 11:07 PM by Rex A Lott.

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gbtr6 Perry Rondou
Titletown, WI, USA   USA
Not sure what carbs you have, but if they are SU's, I recommend getting the little green book on how to set them up and tune them.

You have to disconnect the shafts that operate them together, and adjust each separately. First, set the mixture 1 1/2 turns out. Then, set the airflow. A Unisyn helps. Once they are sucking the same amount of air, tighten the clamps on the cross shafts allowing them to operate synchronously. They are pretty simple, but you may have to try this operation a couple of times. Make sure the needles are clamped in place. If not, that throws them off tremendously. I know that personally. Once set, they are virtually trouble free. Make sure there are no vacuum leaks at the shafts too. Use ATF for the damper chamber.

Perry

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1507814 by gbtr6 I recommend getting the little green book...

You have to disconnect the shafts...

Perry

I have the book.
I disconnected the carbs from each other and from the throttle linkage.

I cannot get the rear carb to suck harder and I can’t get the front to suck less by adjusting the idle screws. Head scratching ensues. Choke is off and fast-idle screws are not in play. Engine RPM is ~1000 and the engine runs and revs great. When I rev the engine, the rear carbs draws a lot of air but I can’t seem to find a balance at idle. Also of note, I’ve been very careful to connect or block any and all vacuum lines including brake master, ECV, carbon canister connectors to fuel vents, etc.

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
Sounds like the butterfly valve of one carb (at least) may not be propperly seated.
Unfortunately the only way to check/adjust this is to remove the carbs and the the piston removed, hold the carb body up to a strong light and close the butterfly. No light should be seen where the valve closes on the carb body. You may be able to slacken the butterfly screws and reposition the disc.

Another possibility is that you have very worn throttle shafts.
If this is the case, bushing the carb body or possibly fitting oversize shafts will be the only answer.

poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
For the carb that you can't get to suck less, see if the float chamber vent's transition screw is controlling the idle, instead of the throttle stop screw.


Attachments:
Throttle Stop Screw 002.JPG    49.2 KB
Throttle Stop Screw 002.JPG

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Hello everyone. Time for another update.

I pulled the bypass valves off each carb and discovered I was using two different gaskets on them. The result was one carb drawing much more air at idle. Problem solved!

I drove the car. It seemed to work OK, so I promptly drove it to the muffler shop and had my shiny new ANSA exhaust installed. I had the shop install a flange to allow me to disconnect the exhaust. They put a resonator in just below the header (at my request). Interesting that they had to cut the tips off where they meet the final muffler bulge and rotate them slightly to make them appear level. The car sounds great! Very quiet at idle. Noticeable at 3000 RPM.

The first real drive of a car is a huge milestone! Hooray. Of course this drive exposed several new issues and they were big, not small. My temp gauge stopped working. It was fine, then suddenly quit and registered 'cold'. The waterpump started to squeal. I will replace it. No need to second guess that decision. Lastly, the car is very unhappy downshifting or going backwards. There's some sort of driveline lash causing a 'bumping' sound but only on deceleration. Acceleration is fine.

There's a lot of opportunity for a problem here. I have new clutch plates. I personally removed, and replaced the transmission with fresh oil. The driveshaft is rebuilt. There's a new, rebuilt Nissan R200 limited slip differential hanging from a Goodparts bracket system designed for this upgrade. During install of the diff, I discovered a failed mounting post. This is a common problem on TR6. I rewelded it with my limited skills and my inexpensive MIG welder. I suspect it quickly failed again.

Any thoughts on what else it could be? I'm wondering if there's slop in the rear suspension perhaps.

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