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My engine rebuild, step 297...

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TR-PI Avatar
TR-PI Lee Cunningham
Sardis, BC, Canada   CAN
Sorry,,, posted by mistake

Prelubing will give you a cushion for 5 to 10 minuites running to see oil pressure. Running the engine with the valve cover is fine, after all if it does start to spray oil that’s a ‘good’ thing
PS... there are 2 small core plugs , one at each end of the shaft. They retain oil pressure in the shaft

Cheers Lee

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South San Frncisco, CA, USA   USA
question again, as seen by all, remarked by one... how all this inquiry, with ro cker, springs, floor of head looking
desert dry? I tore my engine down after 21 years dormant and even then the rockers and springs and floor of head
showed oil clinging... yours is bone dry, like skeleton to fire dry,... how did this ever run and sound fine even for 7 minutes?

I would predict by npw you need, finding why oil is not flowing, addition: new rocker arm sf\haft assemblage...
not the end of the world... but why not having oil flow in first place...
regardez
wes

Krom Avatar
Krom Paul K
San Rafael, CA, USA   USA
Steve- Under the heading of Best Practices, consider that at least one TR6 owner many years ago found that the surfaces of his rocker shaft under several of his rockers exhibited a great deal of scoring. At least two of the rockers did not rotate freely on the shaft, but were very limited in their range of motion. Coincidentally, these damaged rockers were operating valves which turned out to be burned...

Since you have gone so far with your motor already, do yourself a favor and stop for a bit. Take your rocker assembly off the car and completely apart, do a thorough cleaning and be objective and critical about any wear you find. Your rocker assembly is the mechanism that controls your fuel, air and exhaust flows. Consider the possibility of a faulty rocker assembly. It is instructive to lay out the cleaned parts in the order of assembly on a bench (you will have taken good photos to assist your reassembly prior to dismantling). You can even use a Sharpie to mark the shaft on one side of each rocker as you remove it. Run your fingernail over the cleaned rocker shaft and see if you can find ridges. If you can feel ridges, your shaft is worn. If you slide each specific rocker onto its specific spot on the shaft and can get lateral motion (if the rocker tip can be rotated laterally from a perpendicular position versus the shaft), you need to replace it. At the very least, if you have a rocker shaft and rockers you truly believe are not only usable, but within specs, run a bunch of fluid through the shaft ensuring you see all the oiling holes weeping the fluid. Do it right by popping out the end caps and doing a really thorough cleaning, then replace the end caps (new end caps are cheap). If it turns out that your assembly is perfect, but has only the need of the replacement screw, then you can rest assured you have not skimped on a critical component.

Prior to restarting your motor, ensure you have used liberal amounts of assembly lube on your components' wear surfaces including the tips of the rocker arms. With the engine cold, go through the valve adjustment procedure outlined in your manual. Check that there is no binding of the assembly.

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Attachments:
rocker shaft TR6.pdf    590.1 KB

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Thanks everyone. I’ll post more soon. This could be a very simple case of a missing screw.

However, I’m not one to let intelligent insight get in the way of making a simple job hard. Some levity is required here after all, but caution is also warrented. I’ll pull the rocker assembly and inspect carefully.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I took the rocker assembly off and found the oil hole in the rocker shaft sitting over cyl #1. It should be over cyl #6! This was the cause of oil starvation.
The pillars over #2 #3 are frozen on the shaft now. The cotter pin “collapsed’ into pieces when removing it.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-02 02:13 PM by Rex A Lott.


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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
That explains a lot....

South San Frncisco, CA, USA   USA
sorry to hear it, but at least you have the answer. rebuilt by another party?
when you get this sorted out you'll feel good with the world. carry on.
wes

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
So the screw could not be fitted, so it was likely discarded hot smiley

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I finally got around to pounding the rocker shaft off the frozen pedestals. There's scoring on the shaft. The inside of two pedestals is 'burned' from the shaft spinning inside them sans oil. The rocker arms are ovaled out and easily wiggle on the shaft.

So I ordered a roller rocker set! 1.55:1. Merry Christmas to the six, and to me as well I suppose.

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Brett E Avatar
Brett E Brett Evans
Columbus, OH, USA   USA
1973 Triumph TR6 "Scarlet Harlot"
If you're going to roller rockers make sure you're using the correct pushrods for the application. You said earlier that you are running a performance cam. You will most likely need shorter pushrods too.



Nostalgia is the longing for things that never were

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Happy New Year Sixxers!
I’ve been out of town, down with the flu, and busy catching up at work...
I finally found time to play with the single most expensive part I’ve put on this car, my new roller rockers! Woot! This means I’ll have lots of new questions soon, but my valve troubles appear to be resolved!

Gory details: I removed the rocker assembly and tore it dow to discover that a little oil starvation did some damage but there was plenty of wear and tear. Rocker arms had considerable lateral play. The shaft was heavily scored. It was time to replace it.

There was still a question lingering about oil supply to the rockers. I did a test. With the rocker assembly removed I would turn over the engine in the starter and observe oil coming up the galley at the #6 pillar. But what happens when the engine valves don’t open and close? So to do this test I pulled off the distributor and the plugs. This would eliminate spark and relieve cyl pressures.

I turned over the engine until I thought my starter might melt and no oil. Then in frustration I turned it over a bit more and violiá. Oil! See photo 1.

That cleared the way for reassembly. I had to learn how to set valve lash. That went well enough after what might have been the slowest, most careful valve gap setting session ever.

I am running a GP2 cam. I purchased the ‘mild’ roller rocker which has longer rocker arms than stock but not as long as the more aggressive assembly. Valve springs show a gap in the spring coil at full open (springs do not bottom out). Push rod length is correct. After setting valve lash/gap the adjustable screws are all set in the center of their adjustment range.

The last photo of my blackened plugs... Hooray, I’m rich! This is apparent by the thick black soot. It’s OK. Carb tuning is next. I’m running rebuilt carbs that have never been adjusted. Remember, this rebuilt engine only has a couple minutes of run time since it’s full rebuild. One thing at a time. Carbs, then timing.


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South San Frncisco, CA, USA   USA
interesting fasteners for holding head to block.
just a friendly question in general...sooty plugs...running rich
or sign of weak spark, incomplete burn...?
please post when you are driving it, the effect of GP2 and rollers.
good to see your progress.
wes

poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
ARP hardware,wes.
You can get soot like that from incomplete burn because of the ignition timing... too retarded.
People sometimes get confused by what they read in the book.
That, plus extended time with the engine idling...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-07 03:37 PM by poolboy.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
"One thing at a time. Carbs, then timing."

It will be impossible to set the carbs if the timing is off.
I would start with the timing, then adjust the carbs. After a road test, I might adjust the timing again......go back and forth from one to the other until you get optimal runnuning.

Just firing it up from cold for a few minutes is no indiction of how the mixture might be.

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Gah! I have a clearance issue between the spin on oil filter and the clutch slave bleed nipple. My fuzzy memory says this was always an issue but I don’t remember it being this bad. Thoughts?

In the photo the slave mount bolts are not fully tightened. If I cinch the bolts, the nipple will be 1/4” into the wall of the oil filter.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-01-14 02:22 PM by Rex A Lott.


Attachments:
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