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Some 1500 questions

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Mail From: "(email redacted)" <(email redacted)>

I just tore the 1500 (MG) engine down to do a quick inspection, and it
would appear that the engine has just been rebuilt. The mains and rods are
.020 under, and it would appear that it was done because somebody spun a
rod bearing before. The journal area around that rod (number 1) has
discoloration indicating that it got pretty darn hot. Anyway, the job
looks to have been done correctly. I did notice that the main bearings
were Cleavite 77's! I didnt think that these were still available! If
they are I would like to know who carries them -
I also have a later head with the injector ports, so that will be replaced
with an earlier head. Too bad, as I believe that the valves were done when
the rebuild was performed - It will probably be going on eBay since I dont
need an injection port head, and maybe somebody else does -
The pistons appear to be of stock dimensions and there is little if any
ridge (that I can feel anyway) but they are the dished 7.50:1 compression
variaty. I was wondering about replacing them with the 9.00:1, 76 federal
flat top versions, but am a little concerned about possibly having to use
premium fuel. Anybody used these in their 1500 and found this to be true?
I also notice that this MG unit has an extra bracket on the front motor
plate that attaches to the block on the left (or exhaust) side for a bit of
extra support that I don't believe the Spitfires never had. Anybody
confirm this? I may use it unless the header would hit as Ii like the
extra support that it would give-
I also got the water pump with the fan clutch, and am thinking about using
that as well
All this is going on my wife's 70 that already has a 1500 tranny, but is
currently sporting a 1300 with twin SU's which will be transferred to the
1500, although I would like to get a pair of 1 1/2 units instead of the 1
1/4 units on now!

Barry Schwartz
San Diego, CA


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The Interwebs, USA   USA
This read-only message was archived from a public mail list.
Mail From: Jeff Scarbrough <(email redacted)>

At 08:13 AM 12/28/2009, (email redacted) wrote:
>The pistons appear to be of stock dimensions and there is little if any
>ridge (that I can feel anyway) but they are the dished 7.50:1 compression
>variaty. I was wondering about replacing them with the 9.00:1, 76 federal
>flat top versions, but am a little concerned about possibly having to use
>premium fuel. Anybody used these in their 1500 and found this to be true?

I've got a 76, I assume it's 9:1. I use premium fuel.

The cost difference around here is about 12%. That means, at 25 MPG,
it costs an extra $12 to go a thousand miles. If I couldn't afford
that, I couldn't afford a Spitfire. I have used regular and
mid-grade, but not in the hottest part of the year. I didn't notice
any problems, though.

Of course, in sunny San Diego, it'll be a little more expensive. But
it's been my experience that higher octane fuel is available most
everywhere. You could store a bottle of octane boost in the boot for
emergencies.


Jeff Scarbrough 75 TR6 x 1, 76 1500 x 2, 78 1500 x 1, 80 1500 x 0.5
fishplate.org/vehicles/
Corrosion Acres, Georgia #354
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Mail From: "Joe Curry" <(email redacted)>

If you used mid-grade or Regular unleaded and did not get any pinging, then
you are throwing your money away using the Premium grade. The difference in
the fuels is the octane rating and the only thing that octane does is
increase the temperature at which the fuel ignites. If your engine does not
show signs of pre-ignition using regular fuel, then you are not gaining
anything by using higher octane fuels.

Joe

-----Original Message-----
From: (email redacted)
[mailto:(email redacted)] On Behalf Of Jeff Scarbrough
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2009 7:19 AM
To: (email redacted); (email redacted)
Subject: Re: [Spits] Some 1500 questions


I've got a 76, I assume it's 9:1. I use premium fuel.

The cost difference around here is about 12%. That means, at 25 MPG,
it costs an extra $12 to go a thousand miles. If I couldn't afford
that, I couldn't afford a Spitfire. I have used regular and
mid-grade, but not in the hottest part of the year. I didn't notice
any problems, though.

Of course, in sunny San Diego, it'll be a little more expensive. But
it's been my experience that higher octane fuel is available most
everywhere. You could store a bottle of octane boost in the boot for
emergencies.


Jeff Scarbrough 75 TR6 x 1, 76 1500 x 2, 78 1500 x 1, 80 1500 x 0.5
fishplate.org/vehicles/
Corrosion Acres, Georgia #354
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Mail From: (email redacted)

Why do you want to replace the head with the earlier head?B Just get some
plugs and use the later head if it's been done.B There is nothing wrong with
the later head with the air injection ports...flow benches don't lie.



aaron

#87 HP Spitfire 1500

SCCA Southern Illinois Region




----- Original Message -----
From: (email redacted)
To: (email redacted)
Sent: Monday, December 28, 2009 8:13:23 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [Spits] Some 1500 questions

I just tore the 1500 (MG) engine down to do a quick inspection, and it
would appear that the engine has just been rebuilt. B The mains and rods are
.020 under, and it would appear that it was done because somebody spun a
rod bearing before. B The journal area around that rod (number 1) has
discoloration indicating that it got pretty darn hot. B Anyway, the job
looks to have been done correctly. B I did notice that the main bearings
were Cleavite 77's! B I didnt think that these were still available! If
they are I would like to know who carries them -
I also have a later head with the injector ports, so that will be replaced
with an earlier head. B Too bad, as I believe that the valves were done when
the rebuild was performed - It will probably be going on eBay since I dont
need an injection port head, and maybe somebody else does -
The pistons appear to be of stock dimensions and there is little if any
ridge (that I can feel anyway) but they are the dished 7.50:1 compression
variaty. B I was wondering about replacing them with the 9.00:1, 76 federal
flat top versions, but am a little concerned about possibly having to use
premium fuel. B Anybody used these in their 1500 and found this to be true?
I also notice that this MG unit has an extra bracket on the front motor
plate that attaches to the block on the left (or exhaust) side for a bit of
extra support that I don't believe the Spitfires never had. B Anybody
confirm this? B I may use it unless the header would hit as Ii like the
extra support that it would give-
I also got the water pump with the fan clutch, and am thinking about using
that as well
All this is going on my wife's 70 that already has a 1500 tranny, but is
currently sporting a 1300 with twin SU's which will be transferred to the
1500, although I would like to get a pair of 1 1/2 units instead of the 1
1/4 units on now!

Barry Schwartz
San Diego, CA


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Mail From: Mark J Bradakis <(email redacted)>

Just plug the injection ports. You can use standard pipe plugs, though
flat brass with a hex opening look a bit neater.

On the 9:1 1500 autocross motor I built I ran regular gas on the street,
no problem. For events I advanced the timing about 4 degrees and used
a mix of about 1 gallon of 110 octane leaded race gas mixed with 5 - 6
gallons of regular unleaded.

For street use you should be fine with an 87 octane fuel in a 9 to 1
engine.

mjb.
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