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TR7 fuel tank - Rimmer Bros

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Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
Hi,

Has anyone here purchased and installed the TR7 fuel tank that Rimmer Bros sells? I'm slowly reviving my grandfather's 1980 TR7, which I found on craigslist last year(!) in a stroke of luck(?). The next big job is the fuel system.

The old tank is completely full of 25 year old rotten (former) gasoline. I'm in southern CA and the radiator / gas tank repair shop business is sparse here probably due to environmental regs. So it may be more cost effective to replace the tank with new, especially considering the current Rimmer Bros sale on Triumph parts. Shipping looks like only $70 so that's not a huge factor.

Just wondering if anyone here has firsthand experience with that tank and any feedback about it. My car is a 1980, dual Stromberg carbs. I would also be buying a new steel filler pipe and the sending unit "without outlet pipe" / USA spec.

Any help is appreciated!


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BondoRacer Avatar
BondoRacer Roman H
Chicago, IL, USA   USA
I have no experience with the Rimmer fuel tank but if you are looking to buy https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RKC3554
part number RKC3554 you will need the sender with the outlet pipe. This tank only has one hole and thus neeeds somewhere for the fuel to be pumped out of. The sender without outlet pipes were used on later fuel injected cars and TR8s where the electric fuel pump was located in the tank.

Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1587576 by BondoRacer I have no experience with the Rimmer fuel tank but if you are looking to buy https://rimmerbros.com/Item--i-RKC3554
part number RKC3554 you will need the sender with the outlet pipe. This tank only has one hole and thus neeeds somewhere for the fuel to be pumped out of. The sender without outlet pipes were used on later fuel injected cars and TR8s where the electric fuel pump was located in the tank.

Awesome, thanks for setting me straight on that. It wasn't clear from their descriptions which sender I would need.

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Rburgess Avatar
Rburgess Randy Burgess
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
Chris,
It is cool that you have taken an interest in your grandfather’s car and especially cool that you managed to find his personal car! My son, (and the rest of my family) can’t appreciate the British sports car thing, especially a TR7! Good luck with it!

Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1587856 by Rburgess Chris,
It is cool that you have taken an interest in your grandfather’s car and especially cool that you managed to find his personal car! My son, (and the rest of my family) can’t appreciate the British sports car thing, especially a TR7! Good luck with it!

Thanks! I remember riding in this car as a kid, with grandpa at the wheel. He did a ton of work on it, but never got it fully through smog due to failure of the electric pre-heating element in the carb(s), which was NLA. So he got frustrated with it and it sat for years after that. When my dad finally sold it I had a handful of Volvo projects and was joining a racing team so I wasn't in a position to take on another project. Out of the blue I was looking at all Triumphs on LA craigslist in 2017 and noticed this one. "Hmm...looks a lot like grandpa's car. Same color, oh, same weird paint repair on the door....[sound of shuffling through old emails to recover photos from 10 years ago]...same license plate number. Same car!"

I thought it was sad that the guy my dad sold it to had obviously given up on it, since it was being sold for $500 as a non-runner by a tow yard. So I rescued it and have been picking away here and there to get it back on the road. It runs great now with an external fuel source, but I still haven't really driven it. Need to go through the whole fuel system and then brakes.

Grandpa had a Ford Cortina, and before that a 1959 MGA Coupe when it was a fairly new car. My dad used to hotwire it and take it for joyrides when his dad was at work ;-)

My dad got into Italian cars, dirt bikes, and Japanese stuff so I ddin't grow up around British roadsters except for this one. Was very surprised and glad to find it again!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-06 09:58 PM by Duder.

Az7fan Avatar
Az7fan Paul Dorman
Tempe, AZ, USA   USA
I replaced mine with a tank from Rimmers...It was less expensive than anywhere in the states....that said, someone over there snagged my credit car info and tried to use it.....just be careful....smoking smiley

Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1587989 by Az7fan I replaced mine with a tank from Rimmers...It was less expensive than anywhere in the states....that said, someone over there snagged my credit car info and tried to use it.....just be careful....smoking smiley

Will do; thanks for the feedback.

Do you know which sending unit style you used with that tank? Rimmers lists 2 different senders "with outlet pipe"...

1) PETROL TANK SENDER UNIT EARLY TR7 WITH OULET PIPE - TKC147
(no description, but I'm assuming this would be wrong since my 1980 TR7 is not an early car)

2) Fuel Sender Unit - TR7 - with Outlet Pipe - TKC3408
(description says "UK models" )



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-07 04:31 PM by Duder.

gerald4247 Avatar
gerald4247 Gerald Davies
Ventura, CA, USA   USA
I suggest you also replace the tank mounting straps, rubber mounting strip plus the bolts that hold it all in the car, as they can become damaged during tank removal. I did this job on my FI 1980 TR7 and was so pleased I ordered these items, fortunately I did not have to replace the tank.

Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1588166 by gerald4247 I suggest you also replace the tank mounting straps, rubber mounting strip plus the bolts that hold it all in the car, as they can become damaged during tank removal. I did this job on my FI 1980 TR7 and was so pleased I ordered these items, fortunately I did not have to replace the tank.

Thanks for the good advice. I pulled the trigger and ordered the tank, sending unit, straps, rubber, studs, etc.

Rimmers themselves suggested I use sending unit TKC3408, so that's what I ordered. Will report back once I get it into the car!

Fogspawn, CA, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Machine"
ah! shipping is 70...ok. I had my tank at radiator shop tank, they din't do much...
I finished at home with that two or three part chemical and then inner sealant
encapsulating system various vendors sell.. 4 years no problem... but would go for new tank in hindsight...
that old fuel is nasty...
w

navydiver Rob Cornick
san diego, CA, USA   USA
1975 Triumph TR7 "The Pumpkin"
1977 Triumph TR7
1978 Triumph TR8
1980 Triumph TR7 "The Plum"    & more
Good news, it's a So Cal car so things probably aren't rusty just nasty. I've recently pulled the tanks from 2 of my FI cars (the ones with 2 holes) and they were in really good condition part from the layer of varnish in the bottom and which had completely gummed up the suction for the fuel pump and the return line. I use the POR15 tank restoration kit. It requires a couple of hours soak with part one mixed with hot water, a thorough rinse with fresh water and dry (leave it in the sun for an hour, use the etch, then the sealer. The sealer will fill any pinholes you might have and can make the inside of the tank good for another 20 years. As you've already gone to the expense of the new tank don't dump your old one, it is probably better than what many people are working with in east coast cars. The under unit can be cleaned out by emerging it in a bath of acetone for 24 hours. I then use an old piece of wire cable, emergency brake cable in my case, in a cordless drill to scour the inside of the pipes clean, then a final wash in fresh gas. the main difference on your single hole unit is that the level sneer is part of the same piece and will likely be gummed up as well. the soak treatment usually gets that free and working as well.
good luck
Rob



1975 TR7 FHC Ca Spec ACL 4spd
1976 TR7 FHC Ca Spec 4 spd (Temp add)
1977 TR7 FHC ACW 5Spd
1978 TR8 DHC ACT FI development car 5 Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd
1981 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-01-21 04:11 PM by navydiver.

Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1588430 by wes gray ah! shipping is 70...ok. I had my tank at radiator shop tank, they din't do much...
I finished at home with that two or three part chemical and then inner sealant
encapsulating system various vendors sell.. 4 years no problem... but would go for new tank in hindsight...
that old fuel is nasty...
w

Final shipping amount ended up around $150 total because of the size of the box, so fair warning.

Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1591042 by navydiver Good news, it's a So Cal car so things probably aren't rusty just nasty. I've recently pulled the tanks from 2 of my FI cars (the ones with 2 holes) and they were in really good condition part from the layer of varnish in the bottom and which had completely gummed up the suction for the fuel pump and the return line. I use the POR15 tank restoration kit. It requires a couple of hours soak with part one mixed with hot water, a thorough rinse with fresh water and dry (leave it in the sun for an hour, use the etch, then the sealer. The sealer will fill any pinholes you might have and can make the inside of the tank good for another 20 years. As you've already gone to the expense of the new tank don't dump your old one, it is probably better than what many people are working with in east coast cars. The under unit can be cleaned out by emerging it in a bath of acetone for 24 hours. I then use an old piece of wire cable, emergency brake cable in my case, in a cordless drill to scour the inside of the pipes clean, then a final wash in fresh gas. the main difference on your single hole unit is that the level sneer is part of the same piece and will likely be gummed up as well. the soak treatment usually gets that free and working as well.
good luck
Rob

Cool - thanks for your input. Good point about this tank being better than most on the east coast or rust belt. When I get the old tank out I'll inspect it closely and see if it can be cleaned. If so I'll gladly list it for sale here.

I don't know the 1980 - 1990 history of this car but I do know that from 1991 to today it has been here in So Cal. The underside is rust free and extremely nice. Trunk floor is perfect. I haven't pulled up the carpet yet but I don't believe there is any rust in the floor. Yesterday I started pulling the rear suspension upper links and all original fasteners came out with no issue at all - bolts are all still shiny with original zinc plating. Once the new tank and sender arrive I'll do the swap and report back here.

navydiver Rob Cornick
san diego, CA, USA   USA
1975 Triumph TR7 "The Pumpkin"
1977 Triumph TR7
1978 Triumph TR8
1980 Triumph TR7 "The Plum"    & more
Yes sounds exactly like mine, having battled with rusty fasteners in the UK, it was a gift to be able to get the tank out of one of my 1980 cars in 35 mins. As you say the nuts holding the tank straps still have the shiny plating on them. Look online, there are number of ways of cleaning out the old sludge from the tank. Also don't forget the steel line that goes from the rear bulkhead to the engine bay, chances are if the pickup is blocked that will be too. Slightly more awkward to clean out but not impossible. Again using the old emergency brake inner cable splayed out a bit so it works like a steel brush you can remove or at least loosen most of it working from both ends. I then use a spare FI fuel pump to flush it using carb cleaner or a recirculating circuit with a fuel filter on the discharge end of the pipe. If the pipe is not blocked you'll find that the new ethanol fuel will flush it pretty quickly but you'll probably go through a few fuel filters while doing so I use the clear ones on my barbed cars so i can see the fuel change from a stout color to more of a lager over a couple of weeks. A top tip and almost essential for anyone doing an FI tank rest is to let the sealer dry with the tank upside down so any surplus dries at the top of the tank rather than reducing the distance from the fuel pickup from the bottom off the tank. It is important on the FI tanks as there is a swirl pot which the pickup sits in with very small inlet ports which are easily blocked by a thick coat of sealer.
cheers
Rob



1975 TR7 FHC Ca Spec ACL 4spd
1976 TR7 FHC Ca Spec 4 spd (Temp add)
1977 TR7 FHC ACW 5Spd
1978 TR8 DHC ACT FI development car 5 Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI Spider 5Spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5spd
1980 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd
1981 TR7 DHC FI 5 spd

Duder Chris F
Torrance, CA, USA   USA
Hey guys, quick update: the new tank from Rimmers arrived very quickly, but came in an overly large square box instead of a right-sized rectangular one. Because of the box volume they charged me another $90 or so for shipping. FYI.

The tank itself is primed on the outside and bare steel inside. I'm thinking I should seal the interior and paint/undercoat the exterior before installation.

I'll post some photos of the new tank and original tank in the next few weeks when I'm able to resume the job. Thanks for all the tips!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-17 11:54 AM by Duder.

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