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Power steering hard lines

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Power steering hard lines
#1
  This topic is about my 1981 Triumph TR8
sheetsofsound Avatar
sheetsofsound Brent Taylor
New Westminster, BC, Canada   CAN
Has anyone had to replace the hardlines?

I have one of the three lines with a damaged nut, probably because, before I got the car, it was over-tightened to try to stop it from leaking. I thought I would just make up new hardlines myself, but they are SAE bubble flares, not metric. My ISO bubble flare tool is all metric. A quick look around the internet shows bubble flare tool kits for sale in metric sizes only; couldn't find one with 1/4" SAE dies or anvils. I have the 7/16" British Gurling nuts, but my metric bubble flare tool with the 6mm die will not work reliably on the 1/4" tubing - 1/4" being 6.3mm. (I think I have probably tried 20 or 30 times to make the flares using different combinations of SAE and metric dies and anvils to no avail. There are a bunch of discarded tube ends with distorted flares all over my workbench.)

I have tried using an SAE double flare tool to make the bubble flare, as suggested in numerous youtube videos, but they don't look like they will seal and I have heard this method is unreliable. I can probably clean up the damaged nut on the original and reuse it, but I'm not sure how reliable it will be, given that the PO looks like they had trouble getting it to seal in the first place.

Have I misunderstood something about these old style bubble flare ends? Any ideas or suggestions how to fix this? Or is there a non-metric bubble flare tool that I have not been able to find?



Brent



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-09 04:24 PM by sheetsofsound.

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John in Eugene Avatar
John in Eugene Platinum Member John Quilter
Eugene, OR, USA   USA
If your area has equipment hydraulic shops you might take your ends and hose to them and see if they can reproduce what you need.

John F. Quilter
Eugene, Oregon USA

Darth V8R Avatar
Darth V8R Vance Navarrette
Beaverton, OR, USA   USA
1980 Triumph TR7 Drophead "The Great Pumpkin"
1980 Triumph TR8 "Wedgie"
In reply to # 1595340 by sheetsofsound Has anyone had to replace the hardlines?

I have one of the three lines with a damaged nut, probably because, before I got the car, it was over-tightened to try to stop it from leaking. I thought I would just make up new hardlines myself, but they are SAE bubble flares, not metric. My ISO bubble flare tool is all metric. A quick look around the internet shows bubble flare tool kits for sale in metric sizes only; couldn't find one with 1/4" SAE dies or anvils. I have the 7/16" British Gurling nuts, but my metric bubble flare tool with the 6mm die will not work reliably on the 1/4" tubing - 1/4" being 6.3mm. (I think I have probably tried 20 or 30 times to make the flares using different combinations of SAE and metric dies and anvils to no avail. There are a bunch of discarded tube ends with distorted flares all over my workbench.)

I have tried using an SAE double flare tool to make the bubble flare, as suggested in numerous youtube videos, but they don't look like they will seal and I have heard this method is unreliable. I can probably clean up the damaged nut on the original and reuse it, but I'm not sure how reliable it will be, given that the PO looks like they had trouble getting it to seal in the first place.

Have I misunderstood something about these old style bubble flare ends? Any ideas or suggestions how to fix this? Or is there a non-metric bubble flare tool that I have not been able to find?

As was mentioned, taking the line to a hydraulic specialist is very likely to be optimum. I had all my hydraulic hoses rebuilt at a local hydraulic repair shop in Tualatin as they were not available new.

As an alternative, hard line replacements are available from Classic Tube, part numbers TR8-1, TR8-2, and TR8-3 depending on which tube you need. I replaced all three on my rack. I found the bends to be slightly inaccurate, so I had tweak each tube a bit to get it to fit.

One of the tubes carries nothing but air, and is used to allow the air to vent from one side of the hydraulic ram to the other, and so leakage is not a problem as it operates at atmospheric pressure.

Vance



1980 Platinum Metallic TR8, frame off restoration, complete.
1980 Vermilion TR7 Sprint replica, in progress.

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