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How to front coilovers

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parrisw William P
Victoria, BC, Canada   CAN
Did the same thing Todd on mine last year. I can’t get the ride height low enough. 16” tire. 250lb 8” spring I think.

Will

In reply to # 1502979 by TR8todd Found the box that the last set of Ebay coilover came in, but the part numbers are not informative. You just need to make sure you get the longer ones. If the ad says 0 to 4" adjustability, those should do you. Some of the ads only say 0 to 2". I'm guessing those are the short ones. Most of them generically say they fit Honda, Acura. Pick a color. Try to buy a set that the seller gives you the most info on. 250# rate springs are right at the crossover point. 250# 10 should work for a decent ride height unless you have a taller tire than stock. 275# 10" will ride a little high. If you want 275# or stiffer, you will either have to find a 9" spring or use an 8" Eibach. Of course, the length of the spring ultimately comes down to what you do for a top mount. Numbers above are for utilizing the stock rubber upper ,aunts modified to keep the 2.5" spring from walking around. My LS3 powered car has an aluminum cup for a top mount right up against a camber plate, with a roller bearing sandwiched between them. Need a longer spring on this setup.

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VJTR7 Versile Johnson
Poteau, OK, USA   USA
Anyone have a picture showing them installed without the tire on? I took them time to clean and repaint the entire front suspension but it doesn't feel like everything is in the right spot.

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
The spring length you end up needing depends entirely on how you make up the top mounts. There are a few pieces up there that account for several inches of space. Add more spring top hats, or remove the rubber fusion mount and your length changes dramatically. I just did a set with nothing on top except a camber plate. All of the stock top mounting parts are gone. Still not sure what my final spring length is going to be until I get the car on the ground, but its going to be at least a couple inches longer than anything I have laying around.

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parrisw William P
Victoria, BC, Canada   CAN
I did the same. I removed the spring cup. Left just the top mount, then needle bearing then the aluminum cup that holds the spring. I could run a shorter spring. But even with the 8” when the car is jacked the spring is loose, and needs to be put back into place. I really just need shorter shocks.

Will

In reply to # 1528920 by TR8todd The spring length you end up needing depends entirely on how you make up the top mounts. There are a few pieces up there that account for several inches of space. Add more spring top hats, or remove the rubber fusion mount and your length changes dramatically. I just did a set with nothing on top except a camber plate. All of the stock top mounting parts are gone. Still not sure what my final spring length is going to be until I get the car on the ground, but its going to be at least a couple inches longer than anything I have laying around.

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ghawbrey Greg L
Lafayette, LA, USA   USA
I am going to revive an old topic because I am fabbing rear spring perches for my auto X car and I need a starting point for the spring rate. I plan to use a 6" spring on an adjustable perch. The car will have no steel in the rear bumper and only a 5 gallon fuel cell and the battery in the back. It will be a while before I have an engine and transmission in the car so weighing is out for now. This car will never be on the road again so I am not looking for a smooth ride. The longest trip will be about 60 seconds.



1980 TR7 DHC Sprint Conversion
1974 Jensen Healey
1976 TR7 FHC Solo II Project
1993 3000GT VR4

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
An extremely firm road car/soft autocross setup would be 300 front 300 rear. Your final rear spring rate is going to depend on the front rate as well as sway bar rates. The rear is always tricky on a track car because of the different track surfaces. Autocross tracks are all basically flat and smooth, so its a little easier to dial in spring rates. You want some lean in the rear with a solid axle to gain mechanical grip. I'd start with something like 450 up front and 350 in the rear and see where you go from there. With rates that high, you are going to need quality dampers. Koni 8610s at a minimum. The commonly available TR7/8 spec shocks won't work with anything over 300 or so pounds. You need dedicated race shocks and inserts.

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Addicted Mike Hagadorn
Russell, PA, USA   USA
I came up with just about the same conversion for my 5.0 TR7 in late 2013. I guess great minds think alike!
I made a custom aluminum top perches for mine. I did a lot of calculating and planning on springs, and ended up with 150 lb/in 10" long springs simply based on the fact that I could get my ride height and also not have loose springs when the shocks were fully extended. (F=KX, suspension geometry, how much does the shock compress between fully extended and my desired ride height). Roads around me are awful with potholes and bumps, so I did't want autocross suspension. More importantly, I did't want my springs to go limp at full extension. I should probably throw some 200's in there sometime to try. Slightly shorter shock inserts would be the ticket for a stiffer spring.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2018-10-23 02:38 PM by Addicted.

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darrellwalker Darrell Walker
Vancouver, WA, USA   USA
1966 Triumph TR4A "Christy"
1981 Triumph TR8 "Kate"
I don't see any gaiters on the shocks in any of these, is that a concern for a daily driven car?



Darrell Walker
66 TR4A IRS-SC CTC67956L
81 TR8 SATPZ458XBA406206
Vancouver, WA, USA

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TR8todd Avatar
TR8todd Todd Kishbach
Mass, USA   USA
1977 Triumph TR7 "Rally Fraud"
1978 Triumph TR8
1979 Triumph TR7
1980 Triumph TR8    & more
No gaiters, no bump stops. Never had much use for either.

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Addicted Mike Hagadorn
Russell, PA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1598735 by darrellwalker I don't see any gaiters on the shocks in any of these, is that a concern for a daily driven car?


I did gators (boots) on mine. Looking back through my records, I ordered 3 different kinds from Summit. I must have used the top ones (the only one I got a pair of - the other two were single boots). Very inexpensive. I remember spending a long time researching. They are on sale for $6.29 now! I paid too much.

Pro Comp Suspension Systems 12127 - Pro Comp Shock Boots EXP-12127
$6.99 1 $6.99

Rancho RS1952 - Rancho Shock Boots RAN-RS1952
$3.29 1 $3.29

Skyjacker Suspensions B10K - Skyjacker Shock Boots SJA-B10K
$2.84 1 $2.84



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-25 03:33 PM by Addicted.

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