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Stuck Brake Adjuster

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dk pony Avatar
dk pony David C
MT Carmel, TN, USA   USA
1972 Triumph TR6 "Melvin"
Yep, I give up. I tried several heating cycles and nothing budged. I tried and gave it a good shot before ordering new ones.
Thanks for all the advice.

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dk pony Avatar
dk pony David C
MT Carmel, TN, USA   USA
1972 Triumph TR6 "Melvin"
In the true spirit of this restoration I decided to give it one more go. I had my mouse hovering over the "submit" button but stopped before ordering the new ones and decided I wouldn't be beat. That and the fact that these things are cheap enough so that if I beat the s*&^$ out of it it wouldn't matter that much:-)

I heated it a couple more times and let it cool and finally I put a wrench on the adjuster and heard "pop" and felt a slight movement. After a few back and forth turns it finally freed up and...

SUCCESS!!!!!!. The case took a little damage from the vice I had it clamped in but now I know how the thing works so the other one will bend to my will much easier.

20190202_172909 by Firebird2, on Flickr

Thanks again for the help.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-02 08:46 PM by dk pony.

Perdido Avatar
Perdido Gold Member Rut Rutledge
Tuscaloosa, AL, USA   USA
That’s a great feeling!
Rut

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trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
nd the threads look good, how great is that.
Now don't polish the little bits on a wire wheel and have it shot into the obelisk in the garage. LOL



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

dk pony Avatar
dk pony David C
MT Carmel, TN, USA   USA
1972 Triumph TR6 "Melvin"
Have you been watching me? lol. I've had that happen and the parts always go somewhere in the abyss never to be seen again.

I was wondering about the coating on the smaller parts. I can blast and zinc plate or should I just clean them up and anti-seize?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-02 08:45 PM by dk pony.

trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
Just clean and Anti seize. Great stuff and in the case on the threads is a good thing, not normally.
When working on the suspension just get it on the shafts of the bolts just before install.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

BigChill Avatar
BigChill Big Chill
Norwood, MA, USA   USA
In regards to rounding off the square bolt, you can buy 8 point sockets that should fit.



Big Chill

'75 TR6 slowly coming back from the dead...

dk pony Avatar
dk pony David C
MT Carmel, TN, USA   USA
1972 Triumph TR6 "Melvin"
In reply to # 1594935 by BigChill In regards to rounding off the square bolt, you can buy 8 point sockets that should fit.

I have already purchased the needed 8 point socket. Thanks. At the time i was messing with this I didn't have one but will for the other side.

tirebiter Jeff Garber
Dighton, MA, USA   USA
Grab the square head in the vise carefully with a couple of piece of scrap metal so you don't mess up the flats on the head. Point the aluminum body upwards so the square head is underneath.

Heat the aluminum along the area surrounding the threads. I think you'll find it yields quick results, much easier.

dk pony Avatar
dk pony David C
MT Carmel, TN, USA   USA
1972 Triumph TR6 "Melvin"
In reply to # 1595030 by tirebiter Grab the square head in the vise carefully with a couple of piece of scrap metal so you don't mess up the flats on the head. Point the aluminum body upwards so the square head is underneath.

Heat the aluminum along the area surrounding the threads. I think you'll find it yields quick results, much easier.

This has all been covered in this thread and is exactly what I ended up doing but thanks for the tips.

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