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Oil gallery plug above filter

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matchlessman Avatar
matchlessman Ken M
Eastern Ontario, ON, Canada   CAN
I know this topic has been covered at some length in previous posts, however, I have a different question. Having bought my 1972 TR6 in 1976 and owned it since then I think I can be reasonably assured the car is original. It only had 22,000 miles on it when I bought it all those years ago. Having taken the car off the road in the early 1980's with the intention of rehabilitating it (which I've almost completed), I took the engine out, took it apart, including the oil gallery plugs, and had the block hot tanked. I decided to replace the oil gallery plugs, including the original steel plug above the oil filter. TRF sent me the wretched stick of six (or is it nine) aluminum plugs. I dutifully installed the aluminum plug, tightened it as well as I could with a pair of vice grips on the end of the stick and left it. Prior to staring the engine I used an adapter on the oil pump to "motor" it so as to insure oil to all the moving parts. That's when the trouble started. The aluminum plug leaked. I eventually got it out and replaced it with a steel plug acquired from McMaster Carr. That leaks too, even with sealant, though I think it's because the plug is too short and doesn't engage enough threads. I've bought a 3/4-16 bolt of the correct length and machined down the bolt head to a much small size.

Now to my question. Looking into the port the oil gallery plug fits into I can't see anything that would stop the plug threading all the way in the oil gallery. The shop manual says to tighten the plug to 25 ft/lbs (how you do that with the aluminum plug I have no idea). What does the plug butt up against to allow tightening to 25 ft/lbs? I can't see anything for it to butt up against.

Ken
Eastern Ontario

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dicta dick Taylor
Downey, Callifornia, USA   USA
In reply to # 1601207 by matchlessman I know this topic has been covered at some length in previous posts, however, I have a different question. Having bought my 1972 TR6 in 1976 and owned it since then I think I can be reasonably assured the car is original. It only had 22,000 miles on it when I bought it all those years ago. Having taken the car off the road in the early 1980's with the intention of rehabilitating it (which I've almost completed), I took the engine out, took it apart, including the oil gallery plugs, and had the block hot tanked. I decided to replace the oil gallery plugs, including the original steel plug above the oil filter. TRF sent me the wretched stick of six (or is it nine) aluminum plugs. I dutifully installed the aluminum plug, tightened it as well as I could with a pair of vice grips on the end of the stick and left it. Prior to staring the engine I used an adapter on the oil pump to "motor" it so as to insure oil to all the moving parts. That's when the trouble started. The aluminum plug leaked. I eventually got it out and replaced it with a steel plug acquired from McMaster Carr. That leaks too, even with sealant, though I think it's because the plug is too short and doesn't engage enough threads. I've bought a 3/4-16 bolt of the correct length and machined down the bolt head to a much small size.

Now to my question. Looking into the port the oil gallery plug fits into I can't see anything that would stop the plug threading all the way in the oil gallery. The shop manual says to tighten the plug to 25 ft/lbs (how you do that with the aluminum plug I have no idea). What does the plug butt up against to allow tightening to 25 ft/lbs? I can't see anything for it to butt up against.

Ken
Eastern Ontario

Ken --- I ran into the same thing after hot tanking my block. The aluminum plug wouldn't hold back the oil pressure. Then did the same thing you did, using a steel bolt. The unthreaded end of the shank, when bottoming out, provided the thread friction necessary to keep it from leaking, The threaded portion of the bolt was machined down to 1/2 inch in length and has held up well over about 10 years of service. The block is now in the hands of another owner and so far, so good, he says.
An attempt to show the photo says the file is "too big"?

See second post. Disregard the blanking plate part and note the hex bolt.
Dick



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-10 03:33 PM by dicta.

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dicta dick Taylor
Downey, Callifornia, USA   USA
In reply to # 1601216 by dicta
In reply to # 1601207 by matchlessman I know this topic has been covered at some length in previous posts, however, I have a different question. Having bought my 1972 TR6 in 1976 and owned it since then I think I can be reasonably assured the car is original. It only had 22,000 miles on it when I bought it all those years ago. Having taken the car off the road in the early 1980's with the intention of rehabilitating it (which I've almost completed), I took the engine out, took it apart, including the oil gallery plugs, and had the block hot tanked. I decided to replace the oil gallery plugs, including the original steel plug above the oil filter. TRF sent me the wretched stick of six (or is it nine) aluminum plugs. I dutifully installed the aluminum plug, tightened it as well as I could with a pair of vice grips on the end of the stick and left it. Prior to staring the engine I used an adapter on the oil pump to "motor" it so as to insure oil to all the moving parts. That's when the trouble started. The aluminum plug leaked. I eventually got it out and replaced it with a steel plug acquired from McMaster Carr. That leaks too, even with sealant, though I think it's because the plug is too short and doesn't engage enough threads. I've bought a 3/4-16 bolt of the correct length and machined down the bolt head to a much small size.

Now to my question. Looking into the port the oil gallery plug fits into I can't see anything that would stop the plug threading all the way in the oil gallery. The shop manual says to tighten the plug to 25 ft/lbs (how you do that with the aluminum plug I have no idea). What does the plug butt up against to allow tightening to 25 ft/lbs? I can't see anything for it to butt up against.

Ken
Eastern Ontario

Ken --- I ran into the same thing after hot tanking my block. The aluminum plug wouldn't hold back the oil pressure. Then did the same thing you did, using a steel bolt. The unthreaded end of the shank, when bottoming out, provided the thread friction necessary to keep it from leaking, The threaded portion of the bolt was machined down to 1/2 inch in length and has held up well over about 10 years of service. The block is now in the hands of another owner and so far, so good, he says.
An attempt to show the photo says the file is "too big"?

Dick

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Attachments:
Block Breather + Bolt plug.JPG    47.2 KB
Block Breather + Bolt plug.JPG

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ed.h Ed Hollingsworth
Omaha, NE, USA   USA
Straight thread plugs would normally have a machined flat area around the hole for a seal to seat on, but I don't think that's the case on this block, so you have to rely on sealing the threads. I Locktited an adaptor in that hole to adapt it to a pipe plug.



Ed

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tapkaJohnD Avatar
tapkaJohnD John Davies
Lancaster, Lancashire, UK   GBR
If you remember from before you removed it, that plug was peened over when it left the factory.
That skilled deformation effected the seal.
John

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gbtr6 Avatar
gbtr6 Perry Rondou
Titletown, WI, USA   USA
I have also had a leak from here since my rebuild. I think I am going to remove it and put in a bolt with a crush washer.

Perry

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matchlessman Avatar
matchlessman Ken M
Eastern Ontario, ON, Canada   CAN
What Loctite product did you use when you reinstalled the adapter?

Ken

In reply to # 1601224 by ed.h Straight thread plugs would normally have a machined flat area around the hole for a seal to seat on, but I don't think that's the case on this block, so you have to rely on sealing the threads. I Locktited an adaptor in that hole to adapt it to a pipe plug.



Ed

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matchlessman Avatar
matchlessman Ken M
Eastern Ontario, ON, Canada   CAN
Did you install your plug with any kind of sealant? I used Permatex white high pressure thread sealant and still have a leak. The crush washer "fix" is a distinct possibility. I have to carefully examine the face on the block to make sure it's flat enough for a crush washer to properly seal.

Ken
Eastern Ontario

In reply to # 1601297 by gbtr6 I have also had a leak from here since my rebuild. I think I am going to remove it and put in a bolt with a crush washer.

Perry

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