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Lower the accelerator pedal

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smaceng Avatar
smaceng Scott Macdonald
Martinez, CA, USA   USA
What is the best and easiest way to lower the accelerator pedal. It seems one has to "clock" the throttle control lever.
Thx, Scott in CA

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
Yeah, that's the way..if you have the original linkage just make sure the 2 adjustable rods lengths are within spec AND after the control lever is repositioned that you can still get the carbs make it to WOT by hitting the throttle stop.
It's within a hair of WOT in this picture:



ZS carb repairs
kencorsaw@aol.com


Attachments:
Throttle STOP 002.JPG    38.8 KB
Throttle STOP 002.JPG

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smaceng Avatar
smaceng Scott Macdonald
Martinez, CA, USA   USA
how do you get the control lever repositioned....I loosened the nut, then what?
Thx

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skootch13 Avatar
skootch13 Aaron K
Cincinnati, OH, USA   USA
Can you guys give more details please? My accelerator pedal has always seemed high too. Didn't know that there may be a "problem."

Do you mean loosing part # 24, then rotating part #23 towards the rear or towards the front?

https://mossmotors.com/triumph-tr6-250/fuel-intake-emissions/accelerator-pedal-carb-models

Second question and it is a dumb one. Ken, does the throttle lever ALWAYS hit the "throttle stop" on the carb for WOT?



1972 Sapphire Blue TR6

1959 (Registered '60) TR3 TS61635 L

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
It's on a splined section of the shaft. You may have to slide it off that area, reposition it and slide it back onto the splines, then snug it up a bit and see if you have it where you want...trial and error until you do.



ZS carb repairs
kencorsaw@aol.com

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j007 Avatar
j007 Joseph M
Madison, OH, USA   USA
After you reposition it make sure your throttle is opening your carbs all the way when it bottoms out.



Joe
73 Triumph TR6

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poolboy Avatar
poolboy Ken D
Sandy Hook, MS, USA   USA
In reply to # 1602273 by skootch13 Can you guys give more details please? My accelerator pedal has always seemed high too. Didn't know that there may be a "problem."

Do you mean loosing part # 24, then rotating part #23 towards the rear or towards the front?

https://mossmotors.com/triumph-tr6-250/fuel-intake-emissions/accelerator-pedal-carb-models

Second question and it is a dumb one. Ken, does the throttle lever ALWAYS hit the "throttle stop" on the carb for WOT?

Yes, you got the idea, Aaron.
Once you get the gas pedal where you think you want it, floor it and put a brick on it and go see if the throttle stop lever is in firm contact with the throttle stop like the picture I posted.
My hand slipped just as I snapped the picture, but otherwise you would not see any gap whatsoever between the throttle stop lever and the stop post.



ZS carb repairs
kencorsaw@aol.com



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-15 02:27 PM by poolboy.

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dicta dick Taylor
Downey, Callifornia, USA   USA
In reply to # 1602251 by smaceng What is the best and easiest way to lower the accelerator pedal. It seems one has to "clock" the throttle control lever.
Thx, Scott in CA

Scott --- If all you want to do is to lower the position of the throttle (pedal) these are soft steel and can be bent using something like a pair of hefty Crescent wrenches. You don't even have to remove the pedal assembly if you don't want to. To get full throttle it may be necessary to lower the stop bolt directly under the pedal. In the attached photo my pedal is 1/2 inch below the top of the brake pedal when both are at rest.

In case it wasn't obvious, only the rod directly beneath the "blade" of the pedal is what is bent downward. Holding the upper part of the rod above the stop tab, while bending down the part just below the tab. (I like the extra leg room afforded with this arrangement.

Dick



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-16 12:25 AM by dicta.


Attachments:
Pedal Stop Bolt.JPG    48.2 KB
Pedal Stop Bolt.JPG

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tirebiter Avatar
tirebiter Jeff Garber
Dighton, MA, USA   USA
To start with, how much slop do you have in the pedal before the linkage actually begins to open the throttle plate(s) ?

In other words, do you have to press/move the pedal down several inches from it's "at rest" position, before the engine RPMs begin to climb ?

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NHinNC Avatar
NHinNC Larry C
Greensboro, NC, USA   USA
reassembling my engine, I went through this. Use the link in the previous post for reference numbers):

I wanted the gas pedal to be at approximately the height of the brake pedal, so I put things at the pedal to temporarily keep it there.
I then put #23 on (you may be able to loosen it and reposition, then tighten)
Then, adjust #30 so that it will mate with #23.
I also found lots of slop at #34 and #39 such that when the pedal is pushed there would be twisting of #34. This hurts the responsiveness of the gas pedal, and will reduce the amount of travel at the carbs. I cut a piece of gasket material to make a "washer" to take up that slack. That is not a solution to last 100 years, but I did not have a thin enough washer. It should last quite a while, though.



1976 TR6 Mimosa Yellow - not original
Purchased July 2015

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gbtr6 Avatar
gbtr6 Perry Rondou
Titletown, WI, USA   USA
Another benefit is heel and toeing. Getting the brake and throttle about the same height helps, and it’s a fun talent to master.

Perry

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tirebiter Avatar
tirebiter Jeff Garber
Dighton, MA, USA   USA
#34 and #35 in Ken's link are often very worn and the twist that Larry C. points out, will occur. Just those two parts alone when they are extremely worn out, can account for up to 3" of pedal travel before the throttle shafts begin to rotate.

Even with new #34 and #35 reducing the extra pedal travel by NOT twisting as much, a wave washer as shown in the link below can help reduce the extra travel even more than stock.

https://www.lowes.com/pl/Wave-washers-Washers-Fasteners-Hardware/4294710909

I think I always used a 17mm or maybe a 19mm wave washer. Sometimes it was beneficial to weld in some brass in the hole (in #34) and ream it back out a little to make the hole a better fit with a closer tolerance on the pivot (#25) than stock ... even with a new #34 and a new #35.

But I guess if an owner does not care to consider how much freeplay there is, then it's anybody's guess as to what can be done to lower the gas pedal. I've never had to resort to bending one to get it lower when someone asked me to.

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smaceng Avatar
smaceng Scott Macdonald
Martinez, CA, USA   USA
Just to finish up my progress on this issue. I had initially removed as much as I could the free play in the linkage. I then was able to re-clock the control lever as described above. That got the idle position of the accelerator pedal about even with the resting position of the brake pedal. But I did not have wide open throttle. To get that, I needed to trim some carpet under the pedal, and also screw in the pedal stop. All is much better as the accelerator pedal is in amore comfortable position and I can "heel and toe" , which is really toe on the brake pedal, and roll my foot onto the accelerator pedal.
Thanks, Scott in CA

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