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Lever Shock & Spring Replacement

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dsixnero Avatar
dsixnero Dan Colanero
Westville, NJ, USA   USA
Three things I would recommend to get rid of rear end squat, comp.springs with spacer for stock height, have the lever shocks rebuilt to heavy duty specs,and heavy duty rubber trailing arm bushings.

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BRAVOZULU9 Christian Ballester
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
Thanks Dan! I appreciate the info.

When you say comp springs with spacer, could you please explain a bit? Do you mean the 470 lb/in or 600 lb/in springs? Also, which size spacer?

Thanks again!

In reply to # 1594072 by dsixnero Three things I would recommend to get rid of rear end squat, comp.springs with spacer for stock height, have the lever shocks rebuilt to heavy duty specs,and heavy duty rubber trailing arm bushings.

dsixnero Avatar
dsixnero Dan Colanero
Westville, NJ, USA   USA
Chris, I bought the comp. springs and spacers (shims) from Good-Parts. It's an aluminum ring that fits on the spring and adds to the length. Richard can help you with the correct thickness to achieve a stock ride height. I don't know how many pounds they are but along with the uprated lever shocks, is a perfect match. I found the extra hard rubber bushings at The RoadsterFactory and they are very hard to install but they may have helped and I like a rubber separation from the road. These cars always had a squat problem and after putting in my uprated engine with aluminum flywheel, the squat was unbearable. I don't know about now, but does anyone make an up rated spring that is the right length for a stock height? I have a set of new HD springs just sitting in the parts bin, waste of money the car sat too high cause the idiots made them the same length as a stock spring. Well Chris it's been many years since I did this and it was the best thing I ever did for my six. HD springs should be shorter than stock, the comps. are too short, hence the shims, good luck and let us know how you make out. Dan

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BRAVOZULU9 Christian Ballester
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
Thanks very much for the info Dan! Truly appreciated!

I'll speak with Richard on this for sure. Seems like a job but I just can't live with the squat and I'm sure I'll be happy I did it once its complete!

Will be sure to keep you and the forum posted!

Best,

Christian

In reply to # 1594202 by dsixnero Chris, I bought the comp. springs and spacers (shims) from Good-Parts. It's an aluminum ring that fits on the spring and adds to the length. Richard can help you with the correct thickness to achieve a stock ride height. I don't know how many pounds they are but along with the uprated lever shocks, is a perfect match. I found the extra hard rubber bushings at The RoadsterFactory and they are very hard to install but they may have helped and I like a rubber separation from the road. These cars always had a squat problem and after putting in my uprated engine with aluminum flywheel, the squat was unbearable. I don't know about now, but does anyone make an up rated spring that is the right length for a stock height? I have a set of new HD springs just sitting in the parts bin, waste of money the car sat too high cause the idiots made them the same length as a stock spring. Well Chris it's been many years since I did this and it was the best thing I ever did for my six. HD springs should be shorter than stock, the comps. are too short, hence the shims, good luck and let us know how you make out. Dan

tomshobby Avatar
tomshobby Tom Smith
Windsor, WI, USA   USA
These are nylatron bushings after a few years. I now have harder rubber bushings from TRW. Have only had them in for one season so no opinion yet.



Tom Smith
1976 TR6
1974 Midget



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-05 09:07 AM by tomshobby.


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Genoa Bay Eric W
Genoa Bay, BC, Canada   CAN
Tom,
I have had misgivings about these hard nylatron bushings which really change the function from a flex joint to a bearing (some seek to mitigate wear with zerks).
I had inner lower wishbone graphite impregnated bushes oval on the steel spacer in under 500 miles. I wonder if all “Nylaton” is equal.

Krom Avatar
Krom Paul K
San Rafael, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1593955 by BRAVOZULU9 Thanks for the advice Steve, especially on the new bushings - I hadn't considered that! Any recommendations on suppliers with part #s for those?=quote]

Christian-

For stock bushings and slight upgrades, see The Roadster Factory http://trf.zeni.net/TR6-TR250GB/193.php listings. There are threads on this forum discussing the virtues of all of the choices.

Despite my early defense of the uprated rubber bushings and later the urethane versions, I recently installed a set of the nylatron bushings from GoodParts
https://www.goodparts.com/shop/index.php?productID=912 The reason I changed was I noticed my trailing arms had shifted slightly while using the stock/semi-stock bushings such that the trailing arm holes were no longer centered on the bushings, but were instead rubbing against the metal washers and the brackets. I believe the Nylatron bushings do a better job at keeping the trailing arms from "migrating" along the bushings and hopefully, demonstrate some improvement in durability. So far, the ride has been superb. I had noticed a deformation of the urethane bushings I had installed such that the metal sleeve was loose in the bushings. The migration issue was also a problem. Hope this helps. Lots of folks have strong opinions on this. Perhaps they'll share...
PK

dsixnero Avatar
dsixnero Dan Colanero
Westville, NJ, USA   USA
Chris, I forgot to mention that I also installed Good-Parts adjustable trailing arm brackets. You have to get the camber right and adjusting a bracket is so much easier than taking everything apart and trying diff. bracket combinations. I think mine are set as far as they go. Dan

BRAVOZULU9 Christian Ballester
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
Awesome-thanks Dan! That sounds like a sure-fire way to go!!

Unfortunately, now I'm going to hold off on suspension until I get an engine issue corrected. All spark plugs are oil fouled....I just made a separate post on here. Good grief!

Thanks again!

In reply to # 1594422 by dsixnero Chris, I forgot to mention that I also installed Good-Parts adjustable trailing arm brackets. You have to get the camber right and adjusting a bracket is so much easier than taking everything apart and trying diff. bracket combinations. I think mine are set as far as they go. Dan

Tom Johnson Tom J
Monroeville, USA   USA
Hello All,


You should consider looking on ebay under TR6 suspension. There are spring sets there.


Tom J

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