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Installing woodruff key

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I’m having trouble installing the timing cog and woodruff key.

First I drifted the gear over the key only to have the key keep sliding back out of the channel.

Second, I drifted the gear onto the crank without the key. I tried to carefully align the key way rotationally, then I inserted the key. I was able to drive the key 90% home with a 2x4 and a hammer but now all I’m doing is destroying a 2x4 (which is much preferred over damaging the key, crankshaft, or gear).

The gear is VERY hard to drift over the crank, even without the key in place.

Next I will remove the parts and polish the mating sides to improve figment. Lube all the things. Then hold the key down with a zip tie toward the back until I can get the gear started over the key. I might put the timing gear in my toaster oven at 350° to expand the metal (hopefully making the opening larger).

Any advice? No surprise to discover I’m doing it the hard way. On the other hand, it would be no surprise to know it’s just plain persnickety.

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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
I’m completely snowed! Hah.
Oh dear. That might be cabin fever setting in.

LFMTR4 Avatar
LFMTR4 Lou Mijares
Scottsboro, AL, USA   USA
I’ve always put the key in the slot with a little grease to hold it and then carefully slide the gear over. Should work unless you have a key that is too tall or offset.

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
The gear should not be THAT tight that you have to drift it. Is it the one that was on the engine?

ed.h Ed Hollingsworth
Omaha, NE, USA   USA
I've seen keys that were a little oversize. Also, there could be a slight burr on some edges either from manufacture or disassembly. Go over all surfaces with a fine file, especially the edges and corners. Flat faces of the key can be cleaned up with sandpaper on a flat surface.

Ed

zinteck Avatar
zinteck Silver Member David Zinteck
Syracuse, NY, USA   USA
1966 Chevrolet Corvair "Yenko Stinger"
1973 Triumph GT6 MkIII
Steve:

Stoptongue sticking out smileylease remove the key and the chain drive sprocket.

Start with the shaft, make sure that the key sits properly into the shaft key seat. The key must fit into the shaft squarely and the top of the key must be parallel to the shaft.

Then, the key must slide into the sprocket key way, slinger, the front seal spacer and the harmonic balancer separtley. fit each part separately

The key can be a bugger. you may have to file the key way of each part either side or the top of the key to fit. Do not file the key to fit, the parts must fit the shaft and key

When completed you should have a"close sliding fit" and the parts can be easily assembled.

Cheers


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Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Thank you Ed, Tony, Lou.
All parts are original.

I got the key out and gear off w a gear puller.
Now some cleaning, careful filing, heat, and anti-seize to the rescue.

j007 Avatar
j007 Joseph M
Madison, OH, USA   USA
Pull the sprocket off and remove key, make sure sprocket goes on the shaft without key first, make sure the shaft has no burrs on it, I used light emery paper on the inside of my sprocket to polish it out a little , then made sure it went on the shaft. Check the key and make sure it go's in the sprocket slot, should be snug, then check it on the shaft, once you determine things look good, I put a small amount of lube on the shaft and inside the sprocket , place key in shaft slot, then line up sprocket key way, you should now be able to tap it on, might take a little effort, but not a large amount of force. Good luck.



Joe
73 Triumph TR6

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
In reply to # 1595371 by zinteck Then, the key must slide into the sprocket key way, slinger, the front seal spacer and the harmonic balancer separtley. fit each part separately

The key can be a bugger. you may have to file the key way of each part either side or the top of the key to fit. Do not file the key to fit, the parts must fit the shaft and key

When completed you should have a"close sliding fit" and the parts can be easily assembled.

Cheers

Thanks. This was spot on. I found burrs (created by me) in the keyways. Some careful filing and each part fits each other part now.

Heating the gear makes a HUGE difference. It slides right on, then seizes as it cools.

Magic.

POW Peter Wirth
HEBRON, NH - New Hampshire, USA   USA
You say all parts are original. If that also includes the cam and the cam sprocket and the cam plate you can just go ahead and assemble using the suggestions given. If any of those components were replaced it would be a good idea to check timing chain alignment. This would be easier to do without installing the key and when you are satisfied alignment is spot on final installation of the crank sprocket with the key can be made. - Pete

Rex A Lott Avatar
Rex A Lott Steve Kincaid
Newcastle, WA, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Trix"
Which way does the timing gear go on? I've been consulting all manuals, TRF, and other sources and I can't tell if the "long side" goes toward the block or not. In David's photo above, the "long side" is facing away from the block. I've seen several diagrams that seem to show this as well. However, notice in David's photo, the gear is not flush with the bearing lobe. The bearing lobe (my term) on the crankshaft is slightly flanged where it ends. The "long side" of the timing gear has a reverse flange that seems to fit this nicely.

Who's got it backwards? Me in the photo of post #1 or david in post # 6?

http://trf.zeni.net/TR6bluebook/index.php?page=17 seems to imply the long side of the timing gear faces away from the block. So does my haynes manual. But it just doesn't seem to fit right this way.

http://www.tr6pi.com/TR6%20workshop%20Manual.pdf Section 12.65.14 seems to show the long side toward the block.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-09 07:52 PM by Rex A Lott.

zinteck Avatar
zinteck Silver Member David Zinteck
Syracuse, NY, USA   USA
1966 Chevrolet Corvair "Yenko Stinger"
1973 Triumph GT6 MkIII
Steve :

The picture I sent was for demo only. I'm in the process of plasti gaging the engine bearings and I didnt want you to damage your crank. Sorry if it confused you

The crankshaft sprocket will need to be aligned with the sprocket wheel on the cam shaft. The chain teeth will need to be aligned with a straight edge and the crankshaft sprocket may need shims between it and the crankshaft.

This is why the sprocket need to move freely.All the parts are retained by the bolt at the end of the crankshaft and this bolt holds the crankshaft sprocket in alignment.

The proper orientation of the crank sprocket wit be apparent when you do your cam shaft chain alignment

tr6easyrider Avatar
tr6easyrider Joe S
Riverside, CA, USA   USA
Steve, you say all parts are original. Your crank sprocket looks worn , the teeth should not have a sharp points on the end. Should look like
David Zs sprocket. And if the crank sprocket is worn, the timing chain and the cam sprocket are also worn. Now would be the time to replace all three.

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