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All Plugs Oil Fouled - looking for suggestions

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LFMTR4 Avatar
LFMTR4 Lou Mijares
Scottsboro, AL, USA   USA
RN12YC

In reply to # 1594609 by skootch13 What's type of plugs are they? Many here find the Champion's work the best. Myself included. Can't remember the number right now. Anyone?

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brucejon Avatar
brucejon Gold Member Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
When I bought my TR6 I had the same symptoms as you do. I tried everything ignition and carb related, still had the problem. Could not lean out the carbs enough. It turned out the PO had removed the thermostat, and the problem was incomplete combustion caused by running too cold at 160 degrees per IR thermometer. Popped in a thermostat and ran at 185, and suddenly I could adjust the carbs throughout the normal range as expected.

Not saying this is your problem, but worth mentioning as it doesnt come to mind readily.



60 TR3A (red), 62 TR3B project, 72 TR6, 69 Mk3 Spitfire EU setup
https://spitfiremk3.wordpress.com

Fogspawn, CA, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Machine"
thermostat, carb diphragms, plugs, (many swear by
bp6es as you are using, but RN12YC are worth a try,)
Tapka is to be heeded also.
?r u running with the auxilury oil feed line, engine block
to rear head in effort to get more oil to rockers?
Done improperly this will pull more oil into valve cover chamber,
the valve cover vent to intake manifold will send
more oil to combustion chambers as a fine ambient mist
than per design...making more oil in chamber than ignition can burn away/expend...
just a thought. if you have this line, get rid of it...
compression is good. you have to look at everything possible.
you have incomplete combustion... can be caused by numerous gremlins...
often simultaneous... but upside is you are running...

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BRAVOZULU9 Christian Ballester
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
Just so everyone sees this...

Poured a little bit (3 squirts) of oil into each plug hole and performed another compression test. The results are the second set of numbers below the first.


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LFMTR4 Avatar
LFMTR4 Lou Mijares
Scottsboro, AL, USA   USA
Compression looks real good. That’s good news, unless your timing is way off, I vote for carbs. You can try adding Seafoam to the tank and running that through first but I still think the carbs are too rich.

Of course when I had plat plugs in my car t ran like crap until I changed to the Champs on Poolboy’s advise and it made a world of difference with my setup.

Fogspawn, CA, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Machine"
is that degree of jump in compression normal
after oiling cylinders? a general question, i’ve
never done such comparative experiment ...
like Tapka John says, take machine out for a good rip,
stop somewhere quick, then examine plugs...
definitely consider plain jane champion rn12yc...


can it also be weak ingition? gaps, coil, condensor
?..as contributor. Vacuum? id look for anything
that interferes with thorough combustion.
glad I don’t have to presently...
my corrective action in part was points and condensor
from a firm in UK specializing in racing minis...
a condensor that mounts outboard the distributor,
a set of points they market for their racing, a bit more robust
than the regular lucas, replacement coil from N-p- auto...
I feel as a group those parts made a difference...but
the saga did extend to carbs and special attention to
vacuum points, air leaks of any sort. when I finally got it right,
I realized what a difference in the sound of engine bay
and exhaust...
you will get there, it just won’t be magic... very curious, update
with your findings...
w

barry s Avatar
barry s Silver Member Barry Stoll
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
1972 MG MGB GT
1974 MG MGB
1976 Triumph TR6
1980 MG MGB
Wes - I think that your advice is a bit scatter-shot. Having a logical sequence is usually more fruitful. I do think it beneficial to list all possible 'causes' of a problem and all possible 'tests' to evaluate hypotheses. The list(s) must be then organized such that the result of one can influence the performance or interpretation of the next. Especially important is to keep a record of all observations for subsequent analysis.

POW Peter Wirth
HEBRON, NH - New Hampshire, USA   USA
The compression looks reasonable to me. It came up a bit so the rings could be leaking some. Is your exhaust pipe black with a kinda dry soot or black with a kinda greasy style?

BRAVOZULU9 Christian Ballester
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
Hi Peter,

Well, it was black greasy/spotty liquid blotches. Now that I've replaced the plugs, there's no discharge. Also, I pulled the #2 plug after running it hard for about 15 minutes and the plug is not oiled, black, or gassy. Seems fine now?

Do you still think the rings could be leaking with this new info I provided? Perhaps I just screwed up the first compression check?

In reply to # 1594937 by POW The compression looks reasonable to me. It came up a bit so the rings could be leaking some. Is your exhaust pipe black with a kinda dry soot or black with a kinda greasy style?

LFMTR4 Avatar
LFMTR4 Lou Mijares
Scottsboro, AL, USA   USA
It’s not unusual for wet and dry test to be 20 or psi different. Your dry is pretty good, a lot of people wish they 140’s. I wouldn’t worry about that and just drive it some more, maybe it’s just not been exercised properly in a long time and the gas may be stale and rings stuck a bit.

Encouraging news on the new plug but it’s little mileage, keep running it at high RPMs even if you have to stay in lower gear to blow it out. What kind/model plug is it?

clifish Avatar
clifish Cliff Deger
St. James, NY, USA   USA
Christian very often these cars are not driven much (ask me how I know) and then only in short drives. Like others have said, run some seafoam through the tank and drive it is as Ken says "very spirited" AKA the Cajun/Italian tune up! Keeping the rpms up as best you can like highway driving, once the tank is refilled you might find some of your problems have literally gone up in smoke.



74 TR6 - Carbs by POOLBOY
81 Corvette

F1000RACER Avatar
F1000RACER Platinum Member Gary H
Alpine, CA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1594968 by clifish Christian very often these cars are not driven much (ask me how I know) and then only in short drives. Like others have said, run some seafoam through the tank and drive it is as Ken says "very spirited" AKA the Cajun/Italian tune up! Keeping the rpms up as best you can like highway driving, once the tank is refilled you might find some of your problems have literally gone up in smoke.

Sitting for extended lengths of time can lead to rings sticking in the ring grooves. I agree with adding Seafoam to a tank of gas then do some spirited driving. Marvel Mystery oil works well also. This part and parcel to care and feeding of cars that don't get driven much.

GH

BRAVOZULU9 Christian Ballester
Alexandria, VA, USA   USA
Thanks Lou!

New plugs are the NGK BP5ES. The plugs in the car when I bought it (that were sooty/fouled) were the BP6ES, which I understand are 'colder' plugs than the BP5ES. Today's run with the new plugs was incredible - car runs with a highly noticeable pep as compared to before.

In reply to # 1594952 by LFMTR4 It’s not unusual for wet and dry test to be 20 or psi different. Your dry is pretty good, a lot of people wish they 140’s. I wouldn’t worry about that and just drive it some more, maybe it’s just not been exercised properly in a long time and the gas may be stale and rings stuck a bit.

Encouraging news on the new plug but it’s little mileage, keep running it at high RPMs even if you have to stay in lower gear to blow it out. What kind/model plug is it?

POW Peter Wirth
HEBRON, NH - New Hampshire, USA   USA
Sounds encouraging Christian. Forget about it for a while and check the plugs in couple of hundred miles. Exercise is good. - Pete

Fogspawn, CA, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Machine"
you are correct.
after circling the drain
several times over ,
being near drowned
more than once and
shot at... that is me
I go to my 1974.5 october made..
pull choke (always, even here in calif.)
at least a bit, turn key, machine starts....
and hauls as best a non overdrive
version can... plenty police trouble
if I wish, which I do not invite...
if I am seeming cavalier, sorry...
scattergun, yes, and so are sceanarios
offered by those posting their woes...
you are correct.
the log is long enough
for several turtles.
w

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