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What setup do you have to paint?

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brucejon Avatar
brucejon Gold Member Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
My current plan is to do my own bodywork, perhaps a little help here and there, and to prime and do first coat in single stage using PPG. This is because the bodyshop that is going to do the final color sprays uses PPG, and the paint shop he uses is 2 blocks from my house. The paint guy says dont leave it in primer more than a couple weeks, even epoxy. Even with scuffing.

Given I dont need to do an "all at once" spray, what compressor size works for you all that do similar? And what gun do you recommend for an amateur? CFM required? Ease of use?

I did a Spitfire this way in the late 70s using something like a preval spray kit for priming. A buddy who painted C5s in the AF did the color spray. I am a bit out of date. Lots of advise on the web on how to set up a rig that can spray a whole car. Not much on for doing it a panel at a time.



60 TR3A (red), 62 TR3B project, 72 TR6, 69 Mk3 Spitfire EU setup
https://spitfiremk3.wordpress.com

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F1000RACER Avatar
F1000RACER Platinum Member Gary H
Alpine, CA, USA   USA
Personally sprayed over 100 British cars in the last 40 years so have some experience at this.

Compressor Size:
50 gallon tank
Minimum 7CFM

A must- High Quality Water Trap (manual drain preferred)

Spray Gun:
DeVilbiss FLG4-670 HVLP
1.3 1.5 & 1.8mm spray tips (this covers everything from base coat clear coat to super high build Polyester Primer)
If you can afford the upgrade on this gun I recommend the DeVilbiss "DeCUps" system. Allows you to spray inverted and has disposable liners that make clean up a snap.

This gun is an excellent choice even for the seasoned pro. Take a look at the GT6 MkIII on my home page this was shot with this very same gun.

GH

brucejon Avatar
brucejon Gold Member Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
In reply to # 1552799 by F1000RACER Personally sprayed over 100 British cars in the last 40 years so have some experience at this.

Compressor Size:
50 gallon tank
Minimum 7CFM

A must- High Quality Water Trap (manual drain preferred)

Spray Gun:
DeVilbiss FLG4-670 HVLP
1.3 1.5 & 1.8mm spray tips (this covers everything from base coat clear coat to super high build Polyester Primer)
If you can afford the upgrade on this gun I recommend the DeVilbiss "DeCUps" system. Allows you to spray inverted and has disposable liners that make clean up a snap.

This gun is an excellent choice even for the seasoned pro. Take a look at the GT6 MkIII on my home page this was shot with this very same gun.

GH

Thx for the reply. Beautiful paint job on the GT6!!! Too bad you don't live closer or we could make it 41!



60 TR3A (red), 62 TR3B project, 72 TR6, 69 Mk3 Spitfire EU setup
https://spitfiremk3.wordpress.com



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-08-03 10:45 PM by brucejon.

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F1000RACER Avatar
F1000RACER Platinum Member Gary H
Alpine, CA, USA   USA
You are welcome to email me any time. I'm happy to give advise to anyone making the leap into doing their own bodywork. It is more about being patient and using good high quality products....you can't go wrong with PPG.

One thing that most home do it yourself auto body guys struggle with is not having a proper spray booth. You can make a temporary shelter to spray in fairly easily, there's lots of videos on youtube showing the build process.

My recommendation is do all the bodywork yourself all the way through final guide coating and block sanding. Then take it to a pro and pay him to put the top coat on. Most pro's will top coat a car (you supply the materials) for less than $500.

GH

brucejon Avatar
brucejon Gold Member Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
In reply to # 1552812 by F1000RACER You are welcome to email me any time. I'm happy to give advise to anyone making the leap into doing their own bodywork. It is more about being patient and using good high quality products....you can't go wrong with PPG.

One thing that most home do it yourself auto body guys struggle with is not having a proper spray booth. You can make a temporary shelter to spray in fairly easily, there's lots of videos on youtube showing the build process.

My recommendation is do all the bodywork yourself all the way through final guide coating and block sanding. Then take it to a pro and pay him to put the top coat on. Most pro's will top coat a car (you supply the materials) for less than $500.

GH

Top coat by pro. - This is exactly the plan. I have a great guy near me who will have one of his spray guys do the color, in his pro booth. I was hoping given i will not being doing the final that i could get away with a smaller compressor and prime a panel at a time. How long can you leave it in primer? How do you handle doing the work part time over a year or so before topcoating?



60 TR3A (red), 62 TR3B project, 72 TR6, 69 Mk3 Spitfire EU setup
https://spitfiremk3.wordpress.com

F1000RACER Avatar
F1000RACER Platinum Member Gary H
Alpine, CA, USA   USA
There's some thought that leaving it in primer over a long time period can promote moisture to get in and under the primer.

If you keep it garaged or under a carport overhang and covered I don't see it being a problem. Don't let it get rained on or have condensation build up from morning dew.

Modern Polyester Primers and 2k Primers cure fairly rapidly and are intended to be sanded within a few hours after application. For ideal results let them sit for several days before block sanding, this eliminates any shrinkage.

I've personally shot cars that had been primed and block sanded a few years prior to top coating, never seen any ill effect from this. Of course scuffing and sealing prior to top coating is part and parcel to any paint job.

If you are just priming one panel at a time and don't plan to top coat the car yourself you could likely get away with using a smaller compressor. I'd say something more on the lines of 4CFM and maybe a 25 gallon tank. Making the compressor run long periods of time promotes moisture in the line so not running it maxed out is a good thing.

GH



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2018-08-04 12:45 AM by F1000RACER.

cmfisher4 Avatar
cmfisher4 Gold Member Chris Fisher
Mystic, CT, USA   USA
Hi, Bruce. Gary has gobs more experience than I do, but from my basic research, I totally agree with everything he says. I'm using the gun that he recommends and the only problems I've had with it are operator-caused. I also splurged for the DeKups system and love it.

I got some 25'x10' tarps from Walmart and suspended them from cups hooks in the ceiling and that has worked just fine to take care of overspray. I also use a box fan with a discharge filter over it and two air filters taped into holes I cut out in the tarp to try to provide some intake and exhaust filtering. These are just cheap HVAC filters and I'm only trying to take care of the really coarse stuff.

I'm using SPI paint products throughout. Their customer service is great (the owner gives out his cell phone # for tech support, 7-days a week). However, I'd stick with what your local guy is recommending especially since he'll be doing your topcoat (I'm going to be crazy and do it myself drinking smiley)

I've only got limited time to work on the car so I'm leaving it in epoxy and doing the metalwork after that. I try to do it in stages, but I'm just not getting all worked up about the timing of paint yet. However, before I put on my topcoat, I will shoot a sealing coat of epoxy primer over it all just in case (SPI epoxy works great as a sealer, reduced up to 50%).

I'm lucky to have a good sized compressor, 5HP, 60-gallon, running about 11 cfm at 90psi. I haven't painted the whole car yet in one shot, but I did do the underside and I think the compressor only came on once. Do some research and look into minimizing moisture in your air. There are many ways to do this, some of which are not cheap, but I think it's important to make an effort to do this.

I've been in a painting phase for several weeks now and have the last few articles of my blog (and YouTube videos) about my experiences. Again, I've never done any painting and only very minor bodywork in the past so you can get a feel for what this rookie is going through. Link in my signature.

Cheers,
Chris



I learn something new every day...especially if I am working on my LBC!
Please visit my blog and website at http://www.roundtailrestoration.com
and my YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8LASST0WuNG0-po4hK0Maw

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