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The Pub - Off Topic

What kind of people or characters does your TR attract?

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Spitnut64 Avatar
Spitnut64 Gold Member John Mills
Milwaukee, WI, USA   USA
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Sarah Jane"
You could have answered: 'No, but it was designed by a man who did design work for Ferrari - so the mistake is understandable.'

(whoever corrects the child the next time he identifies a Spitfire as a Ferrari might not be very gentle about it) I'm not trying to lay a big guilt trip on you, just pointing out an option should such an occurrence happen again.



"Given enough time, an amateur can build anything.”

- Bob Hicks (as quoted in the 1997 "Mariner’s Book Of Days"winking smiley

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Spity Avatar
Spity John Biek
Fresno, CA, USA   USA
As a portrait photographer, I often photograph at day care centers. On "photo day" I load up my '85 Tercel Wagon with equipment. When I deliver order envelopes or the finished portrait orders I drive my Spit. Kids do love it. Couple weeks ago after parking my car, I followed the teacher and kids from the playground into the classroom. A 4 year old looked at the Spitfire and told his buddy, "it's a robot!" Best reaction yet. john

IrishLA Avatar
IrishLA ryan O
Los Angeles, USA   USA
What I find to be weird is the reaction differences pre vs post restoration. When I was driving the TR4 around with the old ratty interior, duct tape on the crash pad, a big scratch down the side, terrible wheels, etc.....everyone would stop and ask what kind of car it was, comment about how cool it was, and etc. Strike up conversations at red lights, etc. Happened all the time.

After the restoration, where the car looks brand new (new paint, new interior, new chrome, etc) people still look but talk directly to me less. I'll get many nods, thumbs up, or people will tap the person they are with and point, but less people bother to actually talk/speak to me.

I don't really mind because the amount of people asking or commenting was quite high and I'm not driving it for the attention, but I do mind how I'm perceived. I think before I was perceived as a cool cat, common dude, driving an old cool car. I feel like now that the car looks much better (thus more expensive?) I'm probably perceived as less approachable, which is a bummer because for people who don't know that TR's are 'relatively affordable' sports cars.

So while I don't necessarily miss answering, "What year is that?" at every stop light, or engaging in conversation about if it's an MG, I have found, in my experience, when the car looks more 'expensive', people perceive you much differently than when it looks like a beat up old/loved/worn-in daily driver. And while I'll never complain about my restoration result or car quality, because it is wonderful, I don't necessarily like the theory i have regarding how I'm perceived because I'm still just that chill dude driving a cool old car.

It might also have to do with my age. I was 29 when driving around the old beat up version of my car. Now I'm not much older, 32, in the restored vehicle that looks considerably more expensive than it's former self, so perhaps I just look like a spoiled rich kid to most people? I don't know. I don't think about it much but this question got me thinking. Anyway... classic car dudes, and motorcycles give the thumbs up and nods, some people ask about it. But not nearly as many as before directly talk to me.

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Oregontrail Steve Barrett
Silverton, OR, USA   USA
We are stopped quite often. We also were stopped regularly when we got our Mini Cooper in 2005. It was an off brand then. Now we see them everywhere. Both of our Triumphs were not driven before restoration for many years so we don't have the same kind of experience. We are stopped at markets, lights, parking lots, gas stations & numerous other venues. I have had people find me in markets. What we have found is that my wife gets less comments than I. We speculate that it's because some men are more reluctant to make a comment to a woman. I usually plan on extra time when running errands it the TR3. It is flashier with chrome wire wheels & wide white all tires. The TR4A is less distinctive with steel wheels & stock white paint noticed less. It is still noticed a lot though. I often see heads turn as I drive past pedestrians. I think part of it is because these cars are not seen often & thus a little unusual.

GeorgeOhr Nonya Business
Yes, confused, USA   USA
In reply to # 1447196 by billspit
Then one day a hot blonde said "Nice Spitfire. I used to own a TR4." It made my day.


Otherwomen LOVED my BRG TR6 so much I either needed to sell it or hire a good lawyer. winking smiley I have NEVER gotten attention from women like that in/with anything else. That is also counting when I rode a motorcycle in my 20's back before it became a fad.

Robt. Bishop Avatar
Robt. Bishop Gold Member Robert B.
St. John’s, NL, Canada   CAN
1971 Triumph TR6 "Trixie"
I’ve only had one memorable comment (lots of “cool car” and similar) and that was a young female gas attendant who came outside, walked around the car and said “Nice Mazda”.

I don’t particularly like a lot of attention but at least some of it is diverted to my dog Molly when she rides with me in her shades!


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gfe05111952 Avatar
gfe05111952 George Earwaker
Falls Church, VA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1528167 by IrishLA What I find to be weird is the reaction differences pre vs post restoration. When I was driving the TR4 around with the old ratty interior, duct tape on the crash pad, a big scratch down the side, terrible wheels, etc.....everyone would stop and ask what kind of car it was, comment about how cool it was, and etc. Strike up conversations at red lights, etc. Happened all the time.

After the restoration, where the car looks brand new (new paint, new interior, new chrome, etc) people still look but talk directly to me less. I'll get many nods, thumbs up, or people will tap the person they are with and point, but less people bother to actually talk/speak to me.

I don't really mind because the amount of people asking or commenting was quite high and I'm not driving it for the attention, but I do mind how I'm perceived. I think before I was perceived as a cool cat, common dude, driving an old cool car. I feel like now that the car looks much better (thus more expensive?) I'm probably perceived as less approachable, which is a bummer because for people who don't know that TR's are 'relatively affordable' sports cars.

So while I don't necessarily miss answering, "What year is that?" at every stop light, or engaging in conversation about if it's an MG, I have found, in my experience, when the car looks more 'expensive', people perceive you much differently than when it looks like a beat up old/loved/worn-in daily driver. And while I'll never complain about my restoration result or car quality, because it is wonderful, I don't necessarily like the theory i have regarding how I'm perceived because I'm still just that chill dude driving a cool old car.

It might also have to do with my age. I was 29 when driving around the old beat up version of my car. Now I'm not much older, 32, in the restored vehicle that looks considerably more expensive than it's former self, so perhaps I just look like a spoiled rich kid to most people? I don't know. I don't think about it much but this question got me thinking. Anyway... classic car dudes, and motorcycles give the thumbs up and nods, some people ask about it. But not nearly as many as before directly talk to me.

Ryan may have something there, as my "beater" '67 Spitfire gets as many or more nice comments than my other cars. Just last week, while stopped at a traffic light, a teenage girl rolled down her window and asked me what year my car was. I told her the year, and she replied, "It's awesome!" (Far from it in my mind)

While stopped for gas in Front Royal, VA last Thursday a fellow came over to my car and also asked the year. After I responded, he said his father had a dealership in town, and sold Triumphs in the '50s and '60s. His Mom used to drive a TR10 Estate Wagon. He said it was painfully slow.



George
1967 Triumph GT6
1967 Triumph Spitfire4 Mk2
1968 Triumph Spitfire Mk3

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
I think I'm looking forward to this stuff, when the car is actually back on the road.

I have a 65 Mustang I restored, but everyone knows it's a Mustang, and probably a 60s Mustang, so all I've gotten with it is a thumbs up, or if stopped, " Did you restore it yourself ? " .



Home of the 1969 GT6+ MK II resurrection project
and a sorry looking 1968 GT6+ parts car trying to stay whole.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
Early drivers or drivers to be.

Fogspawn, CA, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Machine"
as i stepped from the 74 tr6 to visit store for gear oil... this fellow pops up from sidewalk
says nice looking machine, he has a sparplug in hand, guess he needs more of them...
says the LBC are fun as f to drive but require so much work... naysayers always say that...
if you catch up with the machines mechanical needs, they are not so much work...
gas, oil, either do it yourself or find a shop... but they are not that tough.
most chilling was a lady in parking lot, i like your car, i want it...
wonderful, but sent chills... I just spent years getting it roadworthy...you think
you can just wish something?
most people are polite and respect the machine... as many other machines... represents
lost age it seems...

GilsTR Silver Member Gil Sissons
NoCal, CA, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A "The Redhead"
My favorite personal experience was when parked in
one of our Northern California small towns on a sunny
afternoon with the TR3A. Couple of twenty something
young ladies are looking the car over.... and eventually
Ask " What is it?" I start to explain about the car when
along comes these two twenty something dudes. They
glance at the car then tell the ladies " Lets go... it's just
a kit car". The ladies turned and headed to join the
dudes. As they walked away I told them....
"Kit car? Not in your dreams!"
They walked away with the ladies cueing the dudes in.

Gil. NoCal

Peter-K Peter K
Central, ME, USA   USA
"I never heard of a Triumph."

Fogspawn, CA, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Machine"
Yeah some never heard Triumph even as motorcycle name... my neighbors same thing...
As they observed me one day the car running
No bonnet... in driveway... they had no clue...
And you would think there is not such generational distance, intellectual distance ... but there is...as we move on this century I think fewer and fewer
Will care what they drive, if now they drive at all..
At the same time, my te6 is no where near concours show etc
But is whole.. the machine gets kudos surprisingly from women who then selves or families appreceiate and remember...
The ladies simply know and remember best... though one scarey expression... in a parking lot..”I like your car, I want it...”
Well shucks I got to drive it fir awhile first...
W

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 1589218 by wes gray Yeah some never heard Triumph even as motorcycle name... my neighbors same thing...
As they observed me one day the car running
No bonnet... in driveway... they had no clue...
And you would think there is not such generational distance, intellectual distance ... but there is...as we move on this century I think fewer and fewer
Will care what they drive, if now they drive at all..
At the same time, my te6 is no where near concours show etc
But is whole.. the machine gets kudos surprisingly from women who then selves or families appreceiate and remember...
The ladies simply know and remember best... though one scarey expression... in a parking lot..”I like your car, I want it...”
Well shucks I got to drive it fir awhile first...
W

My daily driver vehicle is an 84 Toyota pick up, it is in near perfect condition and at times draws as much attention as my Triumph, but often in a different way. Many peple do not know how old it is, and when I tell them I am often asked questions like:

"Why don't you buy a new one?"
To which I might reply, "Why SHOULD I buy a new one"

This often puzzles people who buy a new verhicle every few years as a matter of course.

These questions often follow:

Are you not afraid it will break down?
Is it safe?
Can you get parts?

To me it seems natural to continue to use a vehicle until there is a reason not to.

So long as my vehicle pleases me, is presentable, reliable and suits my needs I will continue to use it.

I think this may be becoming an odd concept in a throw away world of 'consumers'. A refrigerator or washing machine my have a life expectancy of 5-6 years, Why would you want it to last longer if you can afford a new one?
Personal electronics often have a shorter life.

Is it any wonder we may be increasingly considerd odd for driving 40+ year old cars, from a manufacturer that no longer exists?

GeorgeOhr Nonya Business
Yes, confused, USA   USA
In reply to # 1591373 by Tonyfixit
In reply to # 1589218 by wes gray Yeah some never heard Triumph even as motorcycle name... my neighbors same thing...
As they observed me one day the car running
No bonnet... in driveway... they had no clue...
And you would think there is not such generational distance, intellectual distance ... but there is...as we move on this century I think fewer and fewer
Will care what they drive, if now they drive at all..
At the same time, my te6 is no where near concours show etc
But is whole.. the machine gets kudos surprisingly from women who then selves or families appreceiate and remember...
The ladies simply know and remember best... though one scarey expression... in a parking lot..”I like your car, I want it...”
Well shucks I got to drive it fir awhile first...
W

My daily driver vehicle is an 84 Toyota pick up, it is in near perfect condition and at times draws as much attention as my Triumph, but often in a different way. Many peple do not know how old it is, and when I tell them I am often asked questions like:

"Why don't you buy a new one?"
To which I might reply, "Why SHOULD I buy a new one"

This often puzzles people who buy a new verhicle every few years as a matter of course.

These questions often follow:

Are you not afraid it will break down?
Is it safe?
Can you get parts?

To me it seems natural to continue to use a vehicle until there is a reason not to.

So long as my vehicle pleases me, is presentable, reliable and suits my needs I will continue to use it.

I think this may be becoming an odd concept in a throw away world of 'consumers'. A refrigerator or washing machine my have a life expectancy of 5-6 years, Why would you want it to last longer if you can afford a new one?
Personal electronics often have a shorter life.

Is it any wonder we may be increasingly considerd odd for driving 40+ year old cars, from a manufacturer that no longer exists?


My DD is 25 and looks like the company car for a meth lab in a trailer park but it runs great and super comfy.

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