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starting engine after 10 years sitting?

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still weldin Dwayne Wiebe
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada   CAN
I was going to pull plugs and squirt Marvel mystery oil in, let sit for a couple of days, turn crank by hand a couple of times and give another squirt. Thought I'd drain , drop and clean oil pan and remove all sludge. Remove gas tank, swish around with new gas and drain, "try" to purge fuel lines with clean gas(any thoughts), change filters and add new fluids. Then attempt to turn over and after oil pressure is built up, connect coil and try to start my Dream.......any thoughts? I'm no mechanic, just want to do it right and minimize any damage.........

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racer490 Jerry Bryant
Palm Harbor, USA   USA
Sounds like a plan New plugs and wire? Points condenser

Mark Jones Avatar
Close to Sarnia, ON, Canada   CAN

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TDHoward Tracy Howard
Radford, VA, USA   USA
1971 Triumph Spitfire "Was "rusty", Now "Spitty"
1980 MG MGB MkIV "Emma Peele"
A couple of things are going to depend upon how it was "stored".

IF it was simply turned off, most likely you'll find the carb(s) have varnish/goop in them. At the very least drop off the float chamber to be sure the needle is free.
After ten years of sitting the diaphram in the carb(s) may be brittle. Carefully take off the dash pots and have a look. Ensure your needle isn't stuck in the jet.

A good spray type carb cleaner will remove most varnish and free things up considerably.

You'll probably find the same thing in the fuel lines. the best solvent for this stuff is fresh gas. if you can remove your fuel lines at the pump and blow back the old stuff with compressed air, you're good.

After you change the oil, I'd remove the dizzy and turn the oil pump with a drill motor for a few minutes to insure that the oil passages are still open and circulate the fresh oil to the rockers...

Will she turn by hand now? Plugs out, put her in 4th and push, this should turn the engine without much resistance.

brit4a Avatar
brit4a Allen Rugg
Conroe,TX, USA   USA
I have the same thing going mine sat 5 years turns over but I did a compression test cold and had 40lbs on all cylinders the valves look new no sludge so hoping it is stuck rings.
Good luck I will be watching this thread..

chaz2000 Avatar
chaz2000 c s
SC, USA, USA   USA
In reply to a post by TDHoward A couple of things are going to depend upon how it was "stored".

IF it was simply turned off, most likely you'll find the carb(s) have varnish/goop in them. At the very least drop off the float chamber to be sure the needle is free.
After ten years of sitting the diaphram in the carb(s) may be brittle. Carefully take off the dash pots and have a look. Ensure your needle isn't stuck in the jet.

A good spray type carb cleaner will remove most varnish and free things up considerably.

You'll probably find the same thing in the fuel lines. the best solvent for this stuff is fresh gas. if you can remove your fuel lines at the pump and blow back the old stuff with compressed air, you're good.

After you change the oil, I'd remove the dizzy and turn the oil pump with a drill motor for a few minutes to insure that the oil passages are still open and circulate the fresh oil to the rockers...

Will she turn by hand now? Plugs out, put her in 4th and push, this should turn the engine without much resistance.

What's a dizzy?

Mark K Avatar
Mark K Mark Karlsberger
NM, USA   USA
It's what you'll be after looking at your bank account in 6 months. :~) It seems to be slang for distributor around here.

Starbuck Monte johnjulio
Greensboro, NC, USA   USA
1967 MG MGB GT "Toaster"
1974 MG MGB "The B"
1979 Triumph 1500
1979 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Shitfire"
In reply to a post by TDHoward A couple of things are going to depend upon how it was "stored".

IF it was simply turned off, most likely you'll find the carb(s) have varnish/goop in them. At the very least drop off the float chamber to be sure the needle is free.
After ten years of sitting the diaphram in the carb(s) may be brittle. Carefully take off the dash pots and have a look. Ensure your needle isn't stuck in the jet.

Correct. That's one of the problems I had with mine. It sat for a few years and the insides of the carb float bowl was all gummed up as well as most of the rest of the carb internals.

With the fuel lines, disconnect and spray carb cleaner in the metal line. try to completely fill it with carb cleaner and let it sit for a few hours. Blow it out with compressed air and repeat.

In reply to a post by TDHoward A good spray type carb cleaner will remove most varnish and free things up considerably.

Yes, but be very careful. I'm not sure what carb(s) you have up in CA but if it a Zenith stromberg, spraying carb cleaner in it will eat away the large rubber diagram under the dash pot. Carb cleaner generally isn't good on rubber bits.
Good luck


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LMF1957 Lyle F
Kensingron, MD, USA   USA
Welding still. How did this turn out. I just acquired a sleeping beauty put up by an elderly gent - not properly. Did you have to rebuild fuel pump and or drop fuel tank? Thanks!

grubscrew Avatar
grubscrew grub screw
The suburbs of, Winfield, Maryland, USA   USA
The original post was in 2010, and that person hasn't logged in to this site since 2011! It will be interesting to see if he responds to the question, LOL.



Dave
1970 Spitfire Mk3
FDU 78359L
34/11 (Jasmine yellow/Black interior)

1962 Triumph TR3B
TCF 575L
Signal Red/Red interior

Fogspawn, CA, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Machine"
there are stories and stories and stories... the funniest being, I put some top lubricant into cylinders and a little fresh gas
and she started right up...
maybe so... but my case prolonged storage, neglect... I have had to fix every mechanical, hydraulic, moving thing... which on bright side let me rellearn a great deal... and up to a point has been fun.
best to avoid long term storage, run enough each week to circulate works and burn off any moisture/ condensations...
otherwise wiser course, sell it to someone who will.. car will actually last longer...
of course life is complicated and somethings wind up on back burner and pilot light extinguished. late to party on this, but thought i’d offer the thought.. i hope he got the vehicle going..
w

Spitnut64 Avatar
Spitnut64 Gold Member John Mills
Milwaukee, WI, USA   USA
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Sarah Jane"
It's Halloween, I guess something had to come back from the dead - so far my Spitfire hasn't.



"Given enough time, an amateur can build anything.”

- Bob Hicks (as quoted in the 1997 "Mariner’s Book Of Days"winking smiley

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