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What did you do to your Spitfire or GT6 today?

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SpitMan Avatar
SpitMan Silver Member Doug Walls
Brandywine, MD, USA   USA
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Lil' Red Fox"
1998 Chevrolet Corvette "Silver Fox"
2007 Chevrolet Silverado "Workhorse"
2013 Chevrolet Malibu "Pearl Baby"
thumbs upthumbs upthumbs upcool smiley

In reply to # 1594405 by wickerwomanbj Hi Greg,
Not only do we own and drive Spitfires, we work on them too!
My 1st car was a 75 British Racing Green 1500 that trained me on hydraulic systems and my 2nd car was a 78 Spitfire that ran like a dream.
Fast forward 30 years, I'm driving a 78 nearly everyday to work and loving it.
Top down until the rainy season starts again.
Greetings from sunny Florida,
Beth

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cmfisher4 Avatar
cmfisher4 Gold Member Chris Fisher
Mystic, CT, USA   USA
Yeah, that repair I did to the rear wing so long ago that I knew was going to come back to bite me...it has. Tried to make it work with the stud puller, but it just wasn't going to happen. I'm going to recover and do it right.

On the plus side, I did get the underside of the bonnet back in epoxy (in preparation for build primer) and the bulkhead back in epoxy following filler work (in preparation for tinted Raptor Liner).

Cheers,
Chris



I learn something new every day...especially if I am working on my LBC!
Please visit my blog and website at http://www.roundtailrestoration.com
and my YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8LASST0WuNG0-po4hK0Maw


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Yellowhawk Valley Avatar
walla walla, WA, USA   USA
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Walla Walla"
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Portland"
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Spokane"
1975 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Dayton"    & more
CHris;:
Did you get that panel to fit first time without working it? Was it a Steelcraft? I have purchased two of those, for the other side, and both are identical but neither is long enough to fit from the rear flange to the lip in the wheel well. (My cut was ugly but that doesn't make it to short) I think the picture shows that the new piece does not fit back far enough to match the curve. I am pretty sure that the fender in there now is original, no signs of work and the history of the car also suggests it is original.

Was your panel flanged on the upper side?
da



Dan Aycock
Walla Walla, Wa.
Yellowhawk Valley Spitfires
69, 69, 72, 75, 78, 79 Spitfires

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cmfisher4 Avatar
cmfisher4 Gold Member Chris Fisher
Mystic, CT, USA   USA
Hi, Dan. Yes, I have the same one you do. It was flanged. I didn't have problems with it fitting fore-to-aft on the car and my cut was really bad and required the additional patch piece which started my whole problem. I did have to put the patch under pressure, so to speak, to get it to bow a bit more - kind of squeezed it and then clamped it in. Hard to explain - I have a video on it but I don't remember how well I explained it.

I didn't have damage that came up as high as the patch was tall, but I cut the entire portion out of the wing anyway, which was a mistake. I cut the patch to fit, instead of the wing to fit the patch, on the other side and it came out much better. I also did butt welds on this side, vice a flange, which I would never do again. So, even though I've only done two, I'd cut the patch to fit every time from here on out.

There are a few videos surrounding this:





Chris



I learn something new every day...especially if I am working on my LBC!
Please visit my blog and website at http://www.roundtailrestoration.com
and my YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8LASST0WuNG0-po4hK0Maw



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2019-02-06 05:37 AM by cmfisher4.

SpitMan Avatar
SpitMan Silver Member Doug Walls
Brandywine, MD, USA   USA
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Lil' Red Fox"
1998 Chevrolet Corvette "Silver Fox"
2007 Chevrolet Silverado "Workhorse"
2013 Chevrolet Malibu "Pearl Baby"
I replaced both rear fenders on mine and did not have a problem with fitting. I do not remember the brand but did get them from Rimmer Bros..
The little finishing strips gave me the most trouble. Getting the correct fit at the B post so that the doors would fit properly was took a little finessing.


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Yellowhawk Valley Avatar
walla walla, WA, USA   USA
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Walla Walla"
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Portland"
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Spokane"
1975 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Dayton"    & more
Doug:
Others have suggested I just replace the whole fender but the thought of another 1000 feet of lips to spot weld does not attract me to that option. But... I will do something.
da



Dan Aycock
Walla Walla, Wa.
Yellowhawk Valley Spitfires
69, 69, 72, 75, 78, 79 Spitfires

SpitMan Avatar
SpitMan Silver Member Doug Walls
Brandywine, MD, USA   USA
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Lil' Red Fox"
1998 Chevrolet Corvette "Silver Fox"
2007 Chevrolet Silverado "Workhorse"
2013 Chevrolet Malibu "Pearl Baby"
Dan, I know what you mean.

I was pretty much forced into the decision after examining the inner fender rust outs and wanting to get to the supporting structure to make sure of rust abatement. I determined that removing all those spot welds would actually be worthwhile - as much as I disliked all that drilling. I think I would have patched the fender had it not been for the need to replace the inner fenders.

Decisions, decisions! Good luck my friend.

In reply to # 1594798 by Yellowhawk Valley Doug:
Others have suggested I just replace the whole fender but the thought of another 1000 feet of lips to spot weld does not attract me to that option. But... I will do something.
da

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
Nuthin' like loosing a rear quarter panel over a speed bump.

triumfan Gold Member David Finkelstein
Fernandina Beach, FL, USA   USA
1974 Jensen Healey "Yellow Peril"
1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Little Red"
Do you have a spotwelder? I bought a 115V one from HF and it works great!

Yellowhawk Valley Avatar
walla walla, WA, USA   USA
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Walla Walla"
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Portland"
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Spokane"
1975 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Dayton"    & more
In reply to # 1595093 by triumfan Do you have a spotwelder? I bought a 115V one from HF and it works great!

Me? Not a spot welder but I do have a very good wire feed and an air operated flanging/punch tool to make nice holes to weld through.
da



Dan Aycock
Walla Walla, Wa.
Yellowhawk Valley Spitfires
69, 69, 72, 75, 78, 79 Spitfires

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
In reply to # 1595187 by Yellowhawk Valley
In reply to # 1595093 by triumfan Do you have a spotwelder? I bought a 115V one from HF and it works great!

Me? Not a spot welder but I do have a very good wire feed and an air operated flanging/punch tool to make nice holes to weld through.
da

I like spot welders for body panels.

The heat doesn't spread as much and there are no fumes so you can work in an enclosed heated garage.

Efp Avatar
Efp John Walsh
London, UK   GBR
+1 on the spot welder, huge timesaver, and that’s how the cars were built. Longtime advocate.
But curious about the 115 v version. My, admittedly low end, 240v one does a great job on a two layer joint at near max power but struggles with a three layer flange unless all surfaces and the tips are very clean and in good contact.
Not certain of the physics involved here, but strikes me a 115v model might not generate enough heat for a secure weld given the amperage available on a domestic circuit?

spitlist Avatar
spitlist Joe Curry
Sahuarita, Sahuarita, AZ, USA   USA
In reply to # 1595210 by Efp +1 on the spot welder, huge timesaver, and that’s how the cars were built. Longtime advocate.
But curious about the 115 v version. My, admittedly low end, 240v one does a great job on a two layer joint at near max power but struggles with a three layer flange unless all surfaces and the tips are very clean and in good contact.
Not certain of the physics involved here, but strikes me a 115v model might not generate enough heat for a secure weld given the amperage available on a domestic circuit?

Ir is not the voltage but the current that generates the heat. That said, some of the 115v spot welders (or any other welders) will pop the circuit breakers unless you have a higher current circuit available to use.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
SpitMan Avatar
SpitMan Silver Member Doug Walls
Brandywine, MD, USA   USA
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Lil' Red Fox"
1998 Chevrolet Corvette "Silver Fox"
2007 Chevrolet Silverado "Workhorse"
2013 Chevrolet Malibu "Pearl Baby"
I use both the spot welder and the punch/flange tool. Whether it is 110 VAC for 220 VAC it all comes down to power, Wattage, A 110 will draw more amperage, about twice as much, to achieve the same power as a 220 spot welder.
My spot welder is a 110 VAC. It was a matter of convenience to use the 110 version. I love the Punch/Flange tool, especially those places that I could not get the Spot Welder to fit into. Also, the areas of triple sheets of metal needed welding I found that my Spot Welder did not work consistently well and had to use the Punch tool. I did see in Eastwood's catalog a nifty Mig Welding tip for spot type welding. I didn't get one because the combination of Punch and weld worked well. True the amount of heat and heat transfer or spread is less with a Spot Welder. Boys and their Toys, what would we do without them!!!

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