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Spitfire & GT6 Forum

Engine block paint

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brucejon Avatar
brucejon Gold Member Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
They also make a hi temp manifold paint that you bake on which seems good so far, a chassis black which I wasnt impressed with, and a tough coat anti chip paint I forgot the name of which works well.



60 TR3A (red), 62 TR3B project, 72 TR6, 69 Mk3 Spitfire EU setup
https://spitfiremk3.wordpress.com

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carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
I cleaned and painted mine. I thought everybody did that.


In reply to # 1592684 by tapkaJohnD Read the very, very small print on VHT paint tins. It says that all rust should be removed and the paint applied to bare metal. I'm sure it works very well when used like that, but who grinds, or blasts their engine block that clean? And unwise, before building the engine, as you will need to thoroughly reclean it afterwards, and spray it with WD-40 to stop it rusting, which would spoil the point of blasting it in the first place.

John



'S all for now
Vic

IanF Ian Furqueron
Croydon, PA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1592564 by TriumphFan On the other engines I've done I've used rattle can engine paint. It does OK for a while but does not stand up to chemicals and tends to discolor with some cleaners. On my TR6 block I am using POR15 as well. My advice to you as someone who has used their products before is to follow the instructions to the letter. Check out You Tube for videos of people applying it.

This.

If done properly, POR15 engine paint is very good. We painted the block and head of my ex's Volvo B20 and nearly 15 years later it still looks great. But as mentioned above, you have to follow the directions to the letter and it is not a project for the impatient. We had the engine out of the car on a stand in her heated sunroom over the winter. The whole process took about a month of after-work sessions.



"Lisle" - '72 GT6 basically stock and original. For now... T-9 conversion pending.
"Winnie the Poo" - '79 Spitfire 1500. Rubber to chrome bumper conversion, otherwise stock at the moment.

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rich wino Richard Ruggiero
wallingford, CT, USA   USA
Just a question about engine paint? I see on the custom auto shows that they sometimes spray the engine with the same color that the car is. They use the same spray gun they spray the car with. My question, is it just auto paint? Do they add an additive in? Is it a special mix from the paint store? I would think that just regular auto paint would just burn off.

SpitnSawdust Avatar
SpitnSawdust Richard Simpson
Lewes, east sussex, UK   GBR
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Little Blue"
+1 for vht rattle can.
I did gunk>pressure wash>wire wheel grinder> brake cleaner>kurust>vht matt Black on the block, head and exhaust manifold.

Held up for at least 30 miles so far!

MarcLoranger Avatar
MarcLoranger Silver Member Marc Loranger
Auburn, CA, USA   USA
Has anyone tried Motor Coater?

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
The outer surface of a motor does not see high temperatures, expect 250F max.
Exhaust manifolds and headers are a different story.

SpiTazz72 Avatar
SpiTazz72 Bryan H
Magnolia, TX, USA   USA
In reply to # 1595764 by clshore The outer surface of a motor does not see high temperatures, expect 250F max.
Exhaust manifolds and headers are a different story.

Carter I think it's probably well above that. Hot exhaust at the far end of the tailpipe can be close to boiling so any radiated heat from the header, even if coated, against that side of the block has to be much higher. Maybe POR-15 handles oils and expansion cycles over time better than others.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1595789 by SpiTazz72
In reply to # 1595764 by clshore The outer surface of a motor does not see high temperatures, expect 250F max.
Exhaust manifolds and headers are a different story.

Carter I think it's probably well above that. Hot exhaust at the far end of the tailpipe can be close to boiling so any radiated heat from the header, even if coated, against that side of the block has to be much higher. Maybe POR-15 handles oils and expansion cycles over time better than others.

Mebbe so, mebbe not … an IR temp gun can easily capture approximate readings to eliminate our speculation.

Fuel percolation from radiated exhaust heat is an issue, but occurs well below 250F.

Even if you guestimate +100F on surfaces near the exhaust, that's still 350F.

I was an industrial painter, our finishes, lacquer, enamel, epoxy, all baked at those temperatures.

T-Bolt Ted Teddy Bear
Wildmansbeach, South-Carelia, Finland   FIN
The manifold side of my block is painted with whatever leftover black cheapo spray paint I happened to have at hand. That was in 2015, no problems yet.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, FL, USA   USA
BBQ Grill paint from Home Depot/Loews/etc

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