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cracks in paint — what can I do?

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RobTAR Robert I
Seattle, WA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1600850 by hairpin Thanks for all the helpful comments.

I think it was summed uo best by saying: this is the car’s natural patina.

With that said. Will claying and then applying McGuire’s #7 hurt the paint job at all? Or will it improve the overall appearence?

Shouldn't hurt unless you have paint loose enough to pull up. The glaze is more of a finisher. If going that route I'd clay, then polish with a random orbital made for polishing then use the glaze.

If wanting a better look with out the paint hassle, or expense there's alternatives like wrapping that I mentioned before, and a few other such as plasti-dipping the outer car, thinned rustoleum applied with foam rollers, or even duplicolor rattle can jobs that look fantastic. The non wrapping options can run as little as a 50 dollars.





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rich wino Richard Ruggiero
wallingford, CT, USA   USA
Wrap it up

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Efp Avatar
Efp John Walsh
London, UK   GBR
Clay’s only purpose is to grip onto and encapsulate surface grit, removing it from the surface before polishing. It has a limited ability to remove road film as well, but really no abrasive quality. It’s just a detailing aid really.
The degree of crazing in the OP’s pictures I’d describe as minimal, and personally I’d be able to live with it, as part of the car’s personality and indeed “patina”, given the huge cost and hassle of removing the damaged layers and respraying.
You could find an unobtrusive spot, and with a matching rattle can to hand for repair, try sanding back the paintwork see how deep the fissures go. It’s unlikely, but possible that they are just within the top layers of top coat, but more likely they reach down to the undercoat or even the base primer. They may even reach down as far as the base metal in which case you have a big problem of potential rust.
I had a similar problem, far worse than the OP’s and similar to some of the later pics, on my first amatuerish paint job of cellulose over epoxy primer, applied too thick during cold damp weather, and with the epoxy overthinned with reducer as I didn’t have a big enough spray tip for the thick paint. Expensive and time consuming mistake, as the excess epoxy reducer trapped within eventually worked its way out by fissuring the topcoats. That’s my theory at least.
I tried, literally, glazing over the cracks using glazing putty but it didn’t really work, my only answer was to rub my way back to primer, and sometimes bare metal, in all affected areas and start again. Incidentally, one of the very few advantages of spraying with cellulose is it’s easy patchability and forgiveness compared to 2k finishes. I also find it’s lustre more in keeping with my early car than the somewhat plasticky perfection of modern 2k, or clear over base, but I guess that’s another discussion...
Anyway, my point is, live with it and accept it, just as you accept the wrinkles your wife develops over the years, or face a large bill for major renovations.. There’s a complex anology involving cosmetic surgery and mistresses and such, with associated costs, brewing here, but I won’t go there.

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hairpin Steven Paul
Ridgewood, NJ, USA   USA
Well said Tony.

My post on paint seems to have brought about differing philosophies on our cars and their conditon.

I’m happy with the car and I appreciate the story the finish tells.

I’ll clay it and use some #7 before waxing and that should do it. I’ll post some pics once I get to it.

Thanks for everyone’s feedback. Glad to see such a passionate group — but afterall, with our Spits, how could we not be.

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Efp Avatar
Efp John Walsh
London, UK   GBR
Tony?

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ludwig113 Paul Barton
Sutton, surrey, UK   GBR
using clay is only for a very dirty paint job, you are more likely to get clay under the peeling paint and damage it even more.
if you wet sand it will expose edges and may speed up the peeling process.
i would leave it alone.

paul

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hughfree Gold Member Tom Freeman
Fayetteville, GA, USA   USA
Hairpin,

I did not completely read ever post so I may be repeating someone else. This is a common problem with our LBC's. Our cars were originally painted with Lacquer primer and finish coat. This base is very unstable. Modern paints are much more stable. When you paint over the lacquer base you will eventually end up with the micro crack finish that is occurring on your car. This is a result of the lacquer base moving or giving away causing the harder finish to crack. Unfortunately, polishing / buffing will not eliminate the problem.

If you want to paint your LBC you have to take it down to metal or you will eventually end up with paint finish problems.

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TheZster Steven Z
SAINT LOUIS, MO, USA   USA
1978 Triumph 1500 "BLK-BRY"
Lots of good advice here - from many folks experienced in the process...…

It all boils down to: Quality costs $$…. End of Story!!! If I'm going to go to the trouble of repainting my car - and want (really want) a high quality finish.... I'm going to:

1. Spend the time and/or $$ to have the prep work done right... smooth as a baby's butt... so to speak...…
2. Spend the time and/or $$ to remove every bit of "trim" on the car (badges, bumpers, chrome fittings, window seals, yadda, yadda, yadda).
3. Have the car finish prepped by a pro. They know the in's and out's of a proper quality job..... and will guarantee their finished product.
4. Have the car painted by the same pro. He knows what was done in prep!
5. Scrimp/save/find a 3rd job to pay for the project.... It won't be cheap for a "show quality/showroom" finish.


Honestly - I figure the cost of a "proper paint job" will cost me almost as much as the initial purchase of Blk-Bry…. But I care little about "Worth V Costs"..... Anyone wanting a show quality LBC realizes they're going to spend a lot more on the parts than the sum of it's parts...….


Break out the rattle can if you must..... Depends on your final expectations.....

Z


Don't take this as snobbish or words of a guy with more money than brains.... I would love to have Blk-Bry repainted... but can't afford the cost of a proper job either.... till then, I rattle can the touch ups (I'm lucky - she's black)….

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