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Chinese Quaife copies in UK

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Gt6s Avatar
Gt6s Laurence Cochrane
Newtownards, UK   GBR
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "2600 EFI"
1973 Triumph GT6 MkIII "2500"
1976 Triumph Spitfire "Sixfire 2500"
A little info for those across the pond. Here in the UK there are an influx of Chinese Quaife ATB differential copies on the market under different brand names. The Link one is branded Blackline.I just bought one of these recently from Rally Design here in the UK and they are very well made indeed. Machined just slightly cosmetically differently to a genuine Quaife. Thing is these come in at about half the price of a genuine Quaife Thought you guys would want to know.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Blackline-Triumph-GT6-Herald-Spitfire-Helical-LSD-HLF080/233036752837?epid=19026843913&hash=item364212a7c5:g:vG4AAOSw7R9cClgq.

Or search Ebay UK

Laurence

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TheZster Avatar
TheZster Steven Z
SAINT LOUIS, MO, USA   USA
1978 Triumph 1500 "BLK-BRY"
O-Boy - here we go... the eternal argument... Chinese knock-offs V original...… I have to say - having bought MaxSpeeding rods for Blk-Bry (absolute Chinese knock-offs) ….. that once in a while - they get it right!! My rods have yet to "stand the test of time" - but original fit is "right on".....

Hope it works out for you....

Z

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SpitnSawdust Avatar
SpitnSawdust Richard Simpson
Lewes, east sussex, UK   GBR
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Little Blue"
Thats why we've leaving the EU. cheap diffs ;-)

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TheZster Avatar
TheZster Steven Z
SAINT LOUIS, MO, USA   USA
1978 Triumph 1500 "BLK-BRY"
In reply to # 1602080 by SpitnSawdust Thats why we've leaving the EU. cheap diffs ;-)

Well: C'mon down to Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas in the good ole USA.... I'll hook you up with whatever you need... one way or another... LOL...

Z

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spitlist Avatar
spitlist Joe Curry
Sahuarita, Sahuarita, AZ, USA   USA
After running one (an original UK made) I am not a real fan of it. It only works when you have both sides of the diff delivering drive. If either side fails due to a broken U-Joint or axle shaft, you lose all drive and are stuck in place.

As far as I am concerned, a locking diff is much preferable.

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Spitfireball Avatar
Spitfireball Brian K
Morristown, NJ, USA   USA
Actually, Zster...I know this cute lil hunnie in the Houston area.....help a bro out with that?

She does have a nice pair of SU's...winking smiley

Brian K.

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MCJ1 Mike J
Flintshire, North Wales, UK   GBR
In reply to # 1602091 by Spitfireball Actually, Zster...I know this cute lil hunnie in the Houston area.....help a bro out with that?

She does have a nice pair of SU's...winking smiley

Brian K.

Are they balanced correctly though?

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T-Bolt Ted Teddy Bear
Wildmansbeach, South-Carelia, Finland   FIN
In reply to # 1602087 by spitlist After running one (an original UK made) I am not a real fan of it. It only works when you have both sides of the diff delivering drive. If either side fails due to a broken U-Joint or axle shaft, you lose all drive and are stuck in place.

Well, that's how a TorSen works, can't multiply with a zero. But I really can't picture how that would be a problem in the real world, you won't be going anywhere with a broken u-joint or driveshaft in
the first place.

Really interested in one of these, would be the perfect solution for replacing a worn diff on a street car. I'm afraid the next diff I will have to deal with is the ASD on my daily driver Merc though...

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Gt6s Avatar
Gt6s Laurence Cochrane
Newtownards, UK   GBR
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "2600 EFI"
1973 Triumph GT6 MkIII "2500"
1976 Triumph Spitfire "Sixfire 2500"
My reason for running Quaifes original UK made ones and now a Chinese one, is that the weakest part in a Triumph small diff is the differential unit itself. That has much liking to explode. Fitting of an ATB eliminates that inherently weak unit. Not much can be done about he CWP. I find the 3.63-1 pretty robust.

Laurence

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tapkaJohnD Avatar
tapkaJohnD John Davies
Lancaster, Lancashire, UK   GBR
In reply to # 1602087 by spitlist After running one (an original UK made) I am not a real fan of it. It only works when you have both sides of the diff delivering drive. If either side fails due to a broken U-Joint or axle shaft, you lose all drive and are stuck in place.

As far as I am concerned, a locking diff is much preferable.

I have to disagree with you, Joe! At least, partially.

The Quaife is an ATB, Automatic Torque Biasing, diff, not really a Limited Slip. I have one, and a few years ago was at Classic Le Mans, where the key that secures the hub to the end of one drive shaft broke up. This left the hub free to rotate on the shaft.
But I noticed nothing at first, as it drove perfectly normally, But as we progressed back to the Channel ports and home, it went slower and slower. It never stopped, but when I couldn't keep up with my mates and the ferry sailing time loomed, I had to abandon it to the RAC Rescue services and come home as a passenger in a friend's car.

You quote "a broken U-joint or axle shaft". In my case, there must have been a small amount of drive to that wheel, via friction at the shaft/hub interface, which wore and got less, but meanwhile, there WAS drive to the car.
The load on the diff must have been great, but when I sent it back to Quaife, they found no wear at all.

John

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RobTAR Robert I
Seattle, WA, USA   USA
So does anyone know how durable a Triumph 3.89 diff with a quaife (or copy) is? Is 200 hp with an abusive driver too much? I'm a bit leery of the quaife, as I plan to drive my car in the winter snow and ice too, it would suck pretty hard to get stuck because of the helical diff, when I could run a Subaru viscous unit instead and not get stuck.

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spitlist Avatar
spitlist Joe Curry
Sahuarita, Sahuarita, AZ, USA   USA
In reply to # 1602215 by tapkaJohnD
In reply to # 1602087 by spitlist After running one (an original UK made) I am not a real fan of it. It only works when you have both sides of the diff delivering drive. If either side fails due to a broken U-Joint or axle shaft, you lose all drive and are stuck in place.

As far as I am concerned, a locking diff is much preferable.

I have to disagree with you, Joe! At least, partially.

The Quaife is an ATB, Automatic Torque Biasing, diff, not really a Limited Slip. I have one, and a few years ago was at Classic Le Mans, where the key that secures the hub to the end of one drive shaft broke up. This left the hub free to rotate on the shaft.
But I noticed nothing at first, as it drove perfectly normally, But as we progressed back to the Channel ports and home, it went slower and slower. It never stopped, but when I couldn't keep up with my mates and the ferry sailing time loomed, I had to abandon it to the RAC Rescue services and come home as a passenger in a friend's car.

You quote "a broken U-joint or axle shaft". In my case, there must have been a small amount of drive to that wheel, via friction at the shaft/hub interface, which wore and got less, but meanwhile, there WAS drive to the car.
The load on the diff must have been great, but when I sent it back to Quaife, they found no wear at all.

John

But in your instance, you still had a bit or resistance which caused the thing to sense the torque. I became quite used to having to halt an autocross while I backed my trailer onto the course and tow my car away when something in the axles/u-joints broke. With no friction, there is no torque and therefore no drive from either side. It was a stripped pinion gear that finally caused me to get rid of the Triumph diff and upgrade. The new unit is a Positraction from a Corvette. No problems since.


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Spitfired Xtreme Michael Perry
Pinson, AL, USA   USA
In reply to # 1602277 by spitlist I became quite used to having to halt an autocross while I backed my trailer onto the course and tow my car away when something in the axles/u-joints broke. With no friction, there is no torque and therefore no drive from either side. It was a stripped pinion gear that finally caused me to get rid of the Triumph diff and upgrade. The new unit is a Positraction from a Corvette. No problems since.


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This should answer RobTAR's question about handling 200hp. You can change the spool piece that holds the ring gear with any kind of limited slip, torque biasing, or lockup and it will not change the load handling capability of the pinion/ring gear. It will still be like glass when the limit HP/TQ is reached -which is likely far less than 200hp. You should be taking a toll of how many people shreaded ring gear/pinion and at what HP/TQ level they were at.

My recommendation is that if you want to put more HP/TQ to the limited potential OEM diff -then opt for something more robust. My guess is that guys who do change out the spool are just wanting less power lost in turns on race days and thus faster track times.



Success is a measure of determination!



Edited 8 time(s). Last edit at 2019-03-16 02:17 PM by Spitfired Xtreme.

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Spitfireball Avatar
Spitfireball Brian K
Morristown, NJ, USA   USA
I'll tell ya, Zster....her SU's are balanced to perfection......I "lift the pistons" just a tad, and instantly receive the "desired" effect!!

Brian K.

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