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Dremel tool switch failures

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bobstr3 Avatar
bobstr3 Silver Member Bob Holt
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1973 Honda Street
2003 Nissan Sentra "Ole Yeller"
2004 Mini Cooper "MINIPRL"
After owning several variable speed and 2 speed Dremel tools and having the switches quit working after a relatively short period of time, I would purchase new switches, then I had the same thing happen again. The switches are the failure points to these tools. They are cheaply made. So having them fail at just the wrong time, I decided , that was enough with buying replacement switches!!!!!!thumbs downangry smiley

I took the tool apart, removed the old switch and wired the motor directly. I then installed a 120V on/off switch, just a couple inches from the end of the tool. A 120V dimmer switch was also purchased and installed into a new electrical outlet wall box and tied into the wiring of an existing electrical outlet, then made one of the plug outlets operate only by the dimmer switch. I now have a tool that I can use at variable speeds and know it will last a long, long time.

I have posted this as a FWIW to others who have had similar frustrations with these tools failing, because of the poor quality switches.

Thanks, Bob

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Spitfirejoe Avatar
Spitfirejoe Joe Guinan
Fremont, Nebraska, USA   USA
1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "The Phoenix"
That is both ingenious and hilarious.



Joe Guinan
Fremont, Nebraska

ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Not Sure At The Moment..."
I kept having trouble with overheating brushes- Melted the blasted housing one time! Still have to fix whatever the current problem is- Guess I'll look at the switch...

Scott

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bobstr3 Avatar
bobstr3 Silver Member Bob Holt
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1973 Honda Street
2003 Nissan Sentra "Ole Yeller"
2004 Mini Cooper "MINIPRL"
Hi Scott,
The dremel tool you are having problems with, is it a variable speed, 2 speed or one speed?.
Thanks,
Bob

ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Not Sure At The Moment..."
In reply to # 1439564 by bobstr3 Hi Scott,
The dremel tool you are having problems with, is it a variable speed, 2 speed or one speed?.
Thanks,
Bob

It is either a single or two speed, I forget which: It is downstairs, still chucked into the drawer it went into last time I tried to use it, and it failed- utterly pissing me off with it...

Thanks!
Scott

bobstr3 Avatar
bobstr3 Silver Member Bob Holt
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1973 Honda Street
2003 Nissan Sentra "Ole Yeller"
2004 Mini Cooper "MINIPRL"
Hi Scott,

Since I made the changes I mentioned above, my original variable speed tool has been working great with my 'variable' speed and 'on/off' switch changes. I have used it often in my car restoration and other projects I have been working on. I am very pleased with the results.

I also have a 2 speed tool, that I have not taken the switch out of yet. I will do that today and document my efforts and post those here with pictures sometime today.

Thanks and my best to you,
Bob

bobstr3 Avatar
bobstr3 Silver Member Bob Holt
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1973 Honda Street
2003 Nissan Sentra "Ole Yeller"
2004 Mini Cooper "MINIPRL"
Hi Scott,

The changes I am showing, can be made to any Dremel tool. The basic tool is the same except for the switches!

You take apart the tool and remove the switch and them solder 2 brass pieces together which, allows current to reach each of the carbon brushes. An "on/off" switch will need to be added otherwise every time you plug it in, it will take off at maximum speed.

See next post for additional photos.

Bob

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bobstr3 Avatar
bobstr3 Silver Member Bob Holt
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1973 Honda Street
2003 Nissan Sentra "Ole Yeller"
2004 Mini Cooper "MINIPRL"
Additional photos which follow the steps as shown in above post.

It does work and you will be pleased with the changes and have gotten rid of the 'WEAK' Point on these tools.

Good luck,

Bob


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ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Not Sure At The Moment..."
I checked last night: it is a single speed... I will try eliminating the switch, and see how it goes! Thanks!

Scott

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trjohnnie John Malinick
Mirror Lake, NH, USA   USA
I had a Dremel tool when I was 12 yo building slot cars and balsa wood airplanes in the 60s and early 70s. Move up to the pro stuff and get out of the hobby shop. Not being harsh,but you get what you pay for. Ive been in the automotive tool business for 40 years and if I sell anything made by Dremel,I tell my customers,If it breaks,dont show it to me, before I sell it. I rather not sell it for the profit involved. Looks like a tool,but it's a toy.

bobstr3 Avatar
bobstr3 Silver Member Bob Holt
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1973 Honda Street
2003 Nissan Sentra "Ole Yeller"
2004 Mini Cooper "MINIPRL"
Good afternoon John,

Thanks for the info. When this one needs to be replaced, I will jump up to the next level. Considering the new switches and other items I purchased, I could have purchased one. Live and learn!

Thanks again,

Bob

Yellowhawk Valley Avatar
walla walla, washington, USA   USA
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Walla Walla"
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Portland"
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Spokane"
1975 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Dayton"    & more
Unfortunately there are very few tools of this nature that are this small and are as handy. I would be interested in knowing other brands that are better. I have two Dremel tools, one corded and one battery. The battery one sucks as when you pull it just a little bit, it will shut itself off. then you have to turn the switch off and on to restart it. The corded one works great except for the initial turn on the switch gets stuck for just a bit then will skip past that point and work fine through the variable part.
Dan

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
I have a Jobmate it was the cheapest tool of it's type at Canadian Tire. I would never have considered it superior to a real Dremel tool, but I still have it after about 10 years! I probably paid less than $10 for it.

To be honest, I don't use tools like this often. Most of the time something heftier like an angle grinder is just more efficient.


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ar2stp48 Paul Best
Magnolia, Arkansas, USA   USA
Bob,
Thanks for the tip. I have two Dremels (395's I think) that WERE multi speed; they are now single speed--max rpm only.. I will try your conversion on them. The switch has been the only problem I have had with Dremel They may be a toy to some, but I have used them and have been pleased. Have three working variable speed models as I don't need one failing when working on a project

Also have the larger version with hanging motor and flex shaft; basically a copy of Foredom And have a Foredom at main bench But the smaller Dremel is easier to use. Certainly easier than dragging an air hose for the die grinder

bobstr3 Avatar
bobstr3 Silver Member Bob Holt
Apache Junction, Arizona, USA   USA
1960 Triumph TR3A
1973 Honda Street
2003 Nissan Sentra "Ole Yeller"
2004 Mini Cooper "MINIPRL"
Since I made the conversion, I have used my Dremels on a regular basis. I have done a lot of close fitting of metal parts and after welding, the close areas that need grinding does not allow a bulky die grinder to get into the areas, The dremel works great and my variable speed set up allows me to dial in the correct speed and not have to worry about "shut downs" where the switch contacts get worn. I use one dremel, with a grinding wheel attachment and another with a Diamond bit (looks like an 1/8" drill bit), to get into tight corners. etc. That way I can change tools without changing out the bits.

I looked into a Dremel with the heavy duty hanging motor and flex shaft, like you have Paul and the cost was over $200. So I think I will stay with the Dremels for now, since I have eliminated the CHEAP SWITCH failures.

Glad I could be of help.

Bob

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