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Tubing Bender Preference

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cmfisher4 Avatar
cmfisher4 Gold Member Chris Fisher
Mystic, Connecticut, USA   USA
Going to be bending a lot of brake and fuel lines in the near future as I get to that point with my restoration. I've purchased both of the Automec kits. Right now, I have a P.o.S tubing bender that I do not want to use to do all of the bends I need to do. I was also smart enough (a rarity at times) to save the old lines to mimic the old bends.

I've come across three styles of tubing bender, though I'm sure there are more, that I could get, one of which is more like a fancy pair of pliers. While I'm sure there are preferences that are subjective, I'm curious if there are any actual advantages to one type over the other or one that is easier to use, etc or if each has a specific usage that would be advantageous for each type of bend.

The three pics show the different types that I'm looking at, but any other recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Chris



I learn something new every day...especially if I am working on my LBC!
Please visit my blog and website at http://www.roundtailrestoration.com



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2016-09-04 07:00 PM by cmfisher4.

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TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
I believe the first two are actually different sizes of basically the same thing. I bought one of each for working on an antique tractor a few months ago; both worked well enough but were somewhat frustrating to get lined up. You need three hands to hold both handles and the pipe being bent. They also won't work very close to a flare nut (for example). The markings are just sort of a general guideline; the tubing will spring back when you release the pressure so the actual bend is always smaller than indicated.

The third type I have no experience with.

What I prefer is actually this style:


With some care, you can trim out the part right next to the little arm, so that a flare nut will fit and allow bends close to the nut. On the TR3, the tight bend is where the brake line enters the rear wheel cylinder. I don't have a good photo, but here's one from Don Elliott where you can infer how close that 90 degree bend needs to be.


On the tractor, it was the line to the oil pressure gauge. The original actually used a right angle fitting at that point, but the fitting wouldn't go onto the replacement gauge.



Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

TR3barton Avatar
TR3barton John Taylor
Greenfield, MA, USA   USA
Listers,

You may wish to see the web site of : http://www.fedhillusa.com

Motor safely !

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jmar Avatar
jmar John M
Strongsville, ohio, USA   USA
I have always had pretty good luck just using an old alternator pulley, some patients and a couple beers.
The secret is to try not to bend it all the way on the first bend. Take your time.

byakk0 Avatar
byakk0 Hazen Wardle
Boise, Idaho, USA   USA
the multi loops that come off the master cyls on some cars...some people just use an approriate sized can to wrap it around.

I bought the black bender you pictured from HF and never touched it. the automec kit bends easily in your hands without kinking. I took it back and got something else.
Granted the runs between bends aren't perfectly straight, but you'd have to build a straightener for that.



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
~Hazen.

ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Not Sure At The Moment..."
If you purchased the Automec cupronickel brake line kit, if you are careful, you can actually bend them without a bender for the most part! Hand bending can be easily accomplished due to the relative softness of the metal. Just one note on the kit- and not something I was too well pleased with when I found it, the Automec kits a few years back went away from the ISO bubble flare, to what they term a "universal" flare, which is Americanese is a simple double flare as American cars have... It WILL work ok in the TRs, but I would have preferred the proper ISO bubble, as it has more surface sealing area... If you notice the difference, it won't hurt you, and it is clearly stated in t heir instructions that they made this change...

Scott

TR3driver Randall Y
Confusion, Los Angeles, USA   USA
Part of the reason that, if there is a next time, I'm going to just buy the line and nuts & do it myself.

The Automec lines are also a bit long in some cases. This was mostly my fault, but wouldn't have happened if the length was the same as the factory part.




Randall
56 TR3 TS13571L daily driver
71 Stag LE1473L awaiting engine rebuild
7? Stag awaiting gearbox rebuild

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ng19delta Avatar
ng19delta Scott Roberts
Merchantville, NJ, USA   USA
1974 Triumph TR6 "Not Sure At The Moment..."
In reply to # 1469370 by TR3driver Part of the reason that, if there is a next time, I'm going to just buy the line and nuts & do it myself.

The Automec lines are also a bit long in some cases. This was mostly my fault, but wouldn't have happened if the length was the same as the factory part.

VERY true- I had to make a few "clearing turns" to take up some of the extra as well...

Scott

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