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Painting my Spitfire

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Chainsaw Avatar
Chainsaw Mike Conners
Brentwood, Brentwood, Tennessee, USA   USA
I live in the Nashville, TN area and I'm debating about repainting my car or having someone else repaint it. I already have the body off and I don't think it would need too much body work to get it ready to paint. I have never painted a car before so that's why I'm reluctant to try it myself. Does anyone know a private individual or small company that would not charge me an arm and leg to paint it for me? I'm not looking so much for show quality as much as I am just a overall good paint job for a frequent driver. The original color is BR Green, but I have always liked the Yellow I see on the Spitfires, but there are so many variations of colors I'm not sure which one I should get. Any leads for a body/painter or suggestions on the color would be appreciated. The attached picture is as the body sits today.

Thanks

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Kootenanny Avatar
Kootenanny Geoff G
Nelson, BC, Canada   CAN
I will follow this thread with interest, because I'm in pretty much the same spot. I'd kinda like to do my own bodywork and paint, though. I have access to a paint booth, but no experience. I'm considering sticking close to the original colour, though...I kinda like the brown.

spridgettr Avatar
spridgettr William Kern
Pittsburgh, Pa, USA   USA
Well any paint job will cost you 2 arms and 1 leg...........If you have or can borrow all the tools DA, boards, HVLP gun, compressor, respirator, etc. You'll need lots of prep work and patience, give it a try, it's not that difficult, just very tedious. Paint and related items have gone thru the stratosphere. Expect to spend minimum $700, and that's a conservative estimate,on paint and supplies. I've done a couple base coat clear coat jobs with excellent results. Remember whatever you paint you need to be able to control dust, that's why I did the base / clear....good luck whichever you choose.

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1147cc Avatar
1147cc Silver Member Douglas Hansen
Westminster, SC, USA   USA
If your car still has the factory paint then it shouldnt be hard to paint it yourself. If its been repainted many times before and the paint is peeling off the car you will need to strip it all off first. If you have a good base I would use a good epoxy primer and paint it yourself; I would recommend single stage urethane paint.



Douglas Hansen
New Parts; Engine Rebuilds; Sheet Metal work and Advice.
http://www.1147cc.com

kenben ken ben
olympia, USA   USA
If the latest paint products aren’t important than something like this may make it more affordable painting is on my list also. http://www.summitracing.com/parts/shw-bsp206/overview/ plus a quart of zerorust and some filler primer. fading is more of a problem with older paints but if you don’t park it outside much it shouldn't be. Williams estament like he said is a conservative one. a friend painted his 56 chev he spent $1800 for supplies. there are some good vids on youtube on stripping, gun setup, and painting. also this link has some info on cheap painting that look very good a little more labor between coats http://rolledon.forummotion.com/

TriumphIdaho Avatar
TriumphIdaho Ron D
Idaho Falls, ID, USA   USA
If you're just going to use it for a daily driver, I would check for paint from Eastwood. I use their one stage, so you only need one coat. I did have a spray booth to use of a friends. The wrinkles at the bottom of the door is just the reflection of the plastic on the floor. I've painted 5 Z-Cars and they all turned out great. JUst used the low pressure spray gun from HF. Just take your time a a lot of sanding but is worth it to say that you did it all.

Ron


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Chainsaw Avatar
Chainsaw Mike Conners
Brentwood, Brentwood, Tennessee, USA   USA
Thanks for the input. I do have access to a paint gun but not a paint booth. I would really like to say I did it myself since I have completely restored the car from the frame up (so far). I only paid $400 for it when I bought it but like I'm sure everyone else has done, I have put 10x that amount back into it so far.

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Chainsaw Avatar
Chainsaw Mike Conners
Brentwood, Brentwood, Tennessee, USA   USA
Ron, your car looks awesome. I hope mine come out that nice.

rhodyspit75 Avatar
rhodyspit75 Ernie Connor
Cumberland, RI, USA   USA
Go for it you will be glad you did it yourself. I used a sealer and 2k urethane. Visit a couple of paint suppliers, I found the second one to be very helpful and bought my supplies from them.

First shot sealer, second paint and third after wet sanding and polish.

My first try at this.



Ernie
1975 Triumph Spitfire

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Dickie B Avatar
Dickie B Dickie Brewer
Clover, South Carolina, USA   USA
1973 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Rose"
1982 Chevrolet Corvette "Buddy"
1991 BMW 850i "Rocket"
2005 Nissan Frontier V6 "NIZMO"
I painted mine in my driveway and it was my first paint job.
You can do it. Don't be scared. If you can paint something small, like an air cleaner, you can paint something big. The process is the same: strip, prep, prime, paint.
If i can do it, anybody can, trust me on this!


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Growe58 Avatar
Growe58 Greg Rowe
Hatfield, PA, USA   USA
OK, I'm going to say a bad word. Maaco. They are independently owned and we are lucky enough to have a well run one near us. Look at the cars in the lot that are done. Ask around. See if they are any good. They have a reputation for skimping on prep - do your own. They skimp on taping - remove the pieces or tape yourself. They may use cheap paint - talk to them or see if they will let you bring in your own. But they do have a booth and the guy with the gun is very experienced.

I had mine painted there for $400 7 years ago. The paint is not factory quality but it is pretty good. And it's held up well (my car is garage kept although I do drive it a lot in the summer).

Just an option.

Chainsaw Avatar
Chainsaw Mike Conners
Brentwood, Brentwood, Tennessee, USA   USA
Someone locally mentioned Macco and said they did a pretty good job for the money. After reading these post though, I think I'm going to try it myself. I figure what the worse that can happen, I screw it up, I can always have a professional do it. smileys with beer

Thanks again to all of your inputs. You have given me more confidence to try it.

tinks-dad Avatar
tinks-dad Silver Member Bob C
Newburgh, NY, USA   USA
Mike,

Here's my paint booth, aka Easy Up. I'm a first time painter and everyone seems to think the results are good. I use single stage PPG products. The paint supplier is your friend and will guide you through the different paint lines and compatibility. Many worry about dust while painting outside, but I try to schedule on a calm day. Wet sanding corrects many/most defects.

You were interested in yellow. Mine is an 80 in the original color, Inca yellow, code 94 or FAB. Didn't like the color when I first got the car, but the more paint vapors I inhale, the more I like it. spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

Go for it.

Bob


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redcoat79 Avatar
redcoat79 Ron J
Olathe, Kansas, USA   USA
I have shot several old American muscle cars in a garage with a box fan in the door blowing out. It has worked well in the past. That is how I plan to paint my current Spit. To differ with some of the other posts here, I am a huge advocate of basecoat/clearcoat. If you are careful when painting color you can blow off any dirt with the paint gun before shooting the clear. Then I shoot the first coat of clear a little dry to protect the color coat from imperfections. That leaves any imperfections (runs, dirt, etc.) to the outer clear coats. I do this because painting in a location like this it is nice to know that all of the problems will be easy to buff out. I had a bug fly into the roof of a Camaro once and crawl halfway across the top of the car in the outer coat. I was able to buff it out perfectly.

A true HVLP gun is a must if your ventilation isn't good. I spray between 4 and 7 lbs of pressure. It really eliminates overspray and makes it easier to see what you are doing.

Also, I have heard the same thing about MAACO. If you prep the car yourself they are good at spraying the color. They are a cheap backup plan if doing it yourself doesn't turn out the way you had hoped.

Kootenanny Avatar
Kootenanny Geoff G
Nelson, BC, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 924692 by Chainsaw After reading these post though, I think I'm going to try it myself. I figure what the worse that can happen, I screw it up, I can always have a professional do it. smiling smiley
Dunno if I should say this, but...well, this is one of the beauties of having a Spit, and a later one at that. They were originally produced as cheap, throwaway cars, and there were a lot of them sold. So, they're relatively cheap and usually easy to find...it's not like we're working on an extremely rare classic worth hundreds of thousands or more. Not dissing Triumphs here--I own one, and I'm very happy to have a car that I can actually contemplate doing my own work on, knowing that if I "screw up," I'm not destroying a piece of history or anything like that.

Personally, I think the knowledge that I did everything myself is important. I've had a few guys tell me how any classic car is a "money pit," and they usually have "a friend" who's spent megabux restoring their car--when what they really did was pay professionals to to the whole restoration for them. While the professionals may well do an excellent job, and are worth the money, there are those of us who prefer to do for ourselves, and are willing to put up with perhaps less than the best work in exchange for knowing we did it ourselves.

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