TRExp

Spitfire & GT6 Forum

steering rack rebuild ?

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
Gary,
If you mean the dowel below the snap ring, it isn't driven in, it just slips in. Rust and dirt may make it difficult, but once the snap ring is out of the way the entire pinion assembly can be removed.
Best of luck,
Paul

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
spurs1canada Avatar
spurs1canada Silver Member Barry Hotspur
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   CAN
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "Mellow Yellow"
1976 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Li'l Red"
I put the VB rack on the GT and the steering is much heavier than original,i think they only have Spitfire racks.

Fictioneer Avatar
Fictioneer Doug Hirt
Colorado Springs, CO, USA   USA
In reply to # 948707 by spurs1canada I put the VB rack on the GT and the steering is much heavier than original,i think they only have Spitfire racks.

This would make sense if it was the higher ratio rack. To compensate you'd have to go back to the old 15-16 inch steering wheels.



"Mr. Filby, do you think he'll ever return?"
"One cannot choose but wonder. You see . . . he has all the time in the world!"

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
spurs1canada Avatar
spurs1canada Silver Member Barry Hotspur
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   CAN
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "Mellow Yellow"
1976 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Li'l Red"
In reply to # 948713 by Fictioneer
In reply to # 948707 by spurs1canada I put the VB rack on the GT and the steering is much heavier than original,i think they only have Spitfire racks.

This would make sense if it was the higher ratio rack. To compensate you'd have to go back to the old 15-16 inch steering wheels.
It wasn't ordered as a quick rack so i assume it's not the right ratio for a heavier GT,they didn't have a listing for the GT so it's probably only for the Spit,terrible parking it.The other thing is the racks are made in "wait for it" Argentina? there are no grease points on these racks either,i had noticed people discussing this on a another forum and it seems Rimmer sells the same ones so i emailed them,they said the interior parts are of a superior nylon and don't need grease? will see how that goes it's three driving seasons so far without any probs,(crosses fingers)

spurs1canada Avatar
spurs1canada Silver Member Barry Hotspur
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   CAN
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "Mellow Yellow"
1976 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Li'l Red"
Another thing i noticed on this rack is that it doesn't seem like there is any lube inside the rubber gaters,is there supposed to be? on my Spit original rack i can squeeze the gaters and feel that there is some lube inside them.

Catfish Phil Avatar
Catfish Phil Phillip Colwart
Hammond, LA, USA   USA
There is nothing to lubricate inside the gaiters (bellows)... they serve as dust covers. I, too have the "new" steering rack, with no lube zerk. They don't need to be re-lubricated, as it is a sealed system. you can always drill a small hole and thread a zerk into it if you wish. AFAIK, GT6 and Spitfire have always used the same steering rack part number...

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
In reply to # 948924 by Catfish Phil There is nothing to lubricate inside the gaiters (bellows)... they serve as dust covers. I, too have the "new" steering rack, with no lube zerk. They don't need to be re-lubricated, as it is a sealed system. you can always drill a small hole and thread a zerk into it if you wish. AFAIK, GT6 and Spitfire have always used the same steering rack part number...
Phil,
The inner ball and socket on the tie rod certainly needs grease. Once greased you may not need to add grease every year, but there has to be grease there. The original steering racks didn't have a zerk, just a blanking plug to be removed and replaced with a temporary zerk for servicing. The plug holds the ground wires to the rack. Original GT6 racks had about one more turn lock to lock than Spitfire racks.
All the best,
Paul

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
spurs1canada Avatar
spurs1canada Silver Member Barry Hotspur
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   CAN
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "Mellow Yellow"
1976 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Li'l Red"
There is no place for a grease fitting as the rack has a large Allen head plug in the box that apparently is only for adjustment.

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
In reply to # 949130 by spurs1canada There is no place for a grease fitting as the rack has a large Allen head plug in the box that apparently is only for adjustment.

Hi,
People will go out of their way to buy ball joints with zerks and tie rod ends with zerks. Why would they turn around and buy a steering rack without any provision for lubrication? It certainly doesn't sound like a long term fix for steering rack wear does it?
All the best,
Paul

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
spurs1canada Avatar
spurs1canada Silver Member Barry Hotspur
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada   CAN
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "Mellow Yellow"
1976 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Li'l Red"
In reply to # 949138 by spitfire50
In reply to # 949130 by spurs1canada There is no place for a grease fitting as the rack has a large Allen head plug in the box that apparently is only for adjustment.

Hi,
People will go out of their way to buy ball joints with zerks and tie rod ends with zerks. Why would they turn around and buy a steering rack without any provision for lubrication? It certainly doesn't sound like a long term fix for steering rack wear does it?
All the best,
Paul
Well the trouble is you don't know until you receive it and get it out of the box,to be honest i don't think we noticed until some time later,that's when i got in touch with Rimmer who said better quality nylon and stuff inside?
It's entirely possible that the rack boxes are re-manufactured and drilled out and tapped for the large Allen grub screw.I assume as interior wear occurs the idea is to tighten the nut to take up slack,i am not exactly the top mechanic on here so really guessing.

EdWills Ed Wills
Calgary, Alberta, Canada   CAN
Hi All,
I realize that the post regarding rebuilding the Triumph Spitfire/GT6 steering rack dates back to 2013, but I'm wondering if anyone has completed a rebuild since then? I have a spare Spitfire rack that I am rebuilding. I purchased a second-hand rack from a wreckers yard, and although it looked o.k., on strip-down I found the (usual?) bend in one of the inner pin and ball joints that indicated a possible curb strike. My original rack had suffered the same damage due to the previous owner slaloming and racing the car hitting a few straw bales during its racing career. I have some new and used very good condition spare parts to complete the rebuild (lots of shims of varying thicknesses, new gaiters, etc.). I have a new rack bearing to fit in the passenger end of the rack, and wonder how this should be removed? I tried using a 3/4" piece of tubing with 2 slits on either side to open up the end to fit the exposed inner end of the bearing and sharpened the tubing end to an almost razor blade finish to punch out the old bearing. Unfortunately due to the piece of shaped metal (rack mounting block stop) welded on to the rack at the passenger end, the welding process shrunk the tubing at this point, and as I gently forced the preformed tubing down the rack tube, the narrowing caused my device to 'jump' the bearing and pop out of the end. I am now considering using a 3 jaw pilot bearing puller (type sold by Harbor Freight?) to extract the bearing. Has anyone tried this method please? Does anyone know if freezing the new bearing and then using a softer drift to set it in place will work? I definitely do not want to be hammering on the bearing with the alloy end (where the pinion fits) used as a stop as this may cause fracturing of this vital alloy end piece. Likewise the bearing does not need a bare steel hammer causing damage to the end. Neither Rimmer or Moss could advise on the best method to change this bearing. If anyone is contemplating performing a rebuild, Lotus in the Lotus Seven manual, provided an excellent detailed description of how to measure and correctly calculate the thickness of the shims for the inner ball joints, the pinion clearance, and the clearance for the top cap nut. Lotus used the Alford and Alder rack in many of their cars, and modified them to suit. If anyone requires a copy, I can send one via email attachment. Apologies for making this message too long, but a final point. I phoned three Triumph parts suppliers in the U.S. inquiring on the cost of the inner ball joints. The prices varied from U.S. $14.00+, to U.S. $78.00+. I was advised that the cheapest one was definitely made in Taiwan, and possibly the mid price units at $30.00 may have also come from there. A couple of the suppliers in question could not advise where their parts were manufactured, but nothing to say they are not up to O.E.M. standards even though the prices vary sometimes considerably.. One U.S. supplier gets theirs from the U.K. where they are manufactured. They are pricier however. Purchasing from the U.K. may be a tad cheaper due to the lower value of the pound, but postage may bring the price up. Cheers. Ed.

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
Ed,
As far as the inner tie rod ball pins go, did you wind up with only one good one? Since they are rebuildable and interchangeable if you have two you can at least set up one rack. If you must buy one, go for the "Made in UK" one, it will at least have more chance of being rebuildable than the Taiwan made ones.
I can't remember any particular trouble removing the passenger side bushing, and you don't need to push against the aluminum housing to put the new one in. The inertia of the housing will let you tap the bushing into place using a mallet and soft drift.
All the best,
Paul

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Outter and inner tie rod wear was a common reason our cars might fail their annual MoT inspection.

The outter would be replaced as a unit. The inner would just be shimed. I have never had to replace an inner ball joint, unless there was actual damage.

I also second the caution of using aftermarket steering racks (been there, done that)

IMO it is very rare that an OE rack cannot be refreshed via bushings, shims and adjustment to like new condition.

EdWills Ed Wills
Calgary, Alberta, Canada   CAN
Hello Paul M. and Tony M. Thanks v. much for the advice. Paul, how did you remove the passenger side bearing i.e. what tool/extractor did you use please? Neither Moss nor Rimmer (who can no longer source the ball and pin joints incidentally) could advise on the bush removal. Rimmer said using heat should be avoided, but my bearing seems to be stuck fast for some reason, even though the rack has been thoroughly degreased and is spotless inside! I have taken your advice and purchased 2 new pin and ball units and some other parts from Moss Motors in the U.K. (where they are manufactured). Tony, I found it way cheaper at the moment to purchase from the U.K. rather than from Moss Motors U.S.A. As you know, our Canadian dollar is still weak against the U.S. Dollar, whereas the U.K. Pound is still at a fairly low exchange rate plus postage is a tad cheaper than from the U.S. I saved $100.00 Canadian this way on identical parts. After the rack strip-down I did end up with only one good pin and ball joint (original Stanpart part), so will save this as a spare just in case. So thanks again gents, and happy motoring. Ed.

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
Ed,
I really don't remember how I removed the bushing. A washer that just fits pulled by a threaded rod (all thread) may be the trick, but I just don't remember
An alternative is simply to push the old bushing farther in so there is room for the new one. Having two in there won't hurt anything. If your rack has the nylon anti-rattle button make sure the hole it goes in stays open.
All the best,
Paul

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions

Members Sign In   or   Create an Account

Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster