Spitfire & GT6 Forum

Welcome! Sign In Register
Please Sign In or Register to Search

Installing Electric fan

Posted by Marc69MK3 
Marcos Rodriguez
New Jersey, USA   usa
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Darla ( From The Little Rascal"

Guys I am installing an Electric Fan for the radiator do you think this combination will work, so that the fan only comes on when the car is on or engine is engaged
I want to have a relay and a fuse in the mix



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/13/2012 07:14PM by Marc69MK3.
. You can hide this ad & support this site by upgrading to a Gold Membership ~ click here for more info

Attachments:
untitled electrical.JPG (10.9 KB) –
untitled electrical.JPG

Falkon Avatar
Al Martin
Wisconsin, USA   usa

You want direct "heavy duty" battery power to #87 and then on to the fan from #30. You want to trip the relay w/ ign power tp terminal #85 Fuse right at the battery for fan load.
Marcos Rodriguez
New Jersey, USA   usa
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Darla ( From The Little Rascal"

Like this you mean
. You can hide this ad & support this site by upgrading to a Gold Membership ~ click here for more info

Attachments:
Copy 1of untitled electrical.JPG (10.9 KB) –
Copy 1of untitled electrical.JPG

Saxist Avatar
Dave B
Valleyfield QC, Canada   can

Marcos with this setup the fan runs all the time the key is on. I would suggest a setup with a thermostat switch that turns the fan on only when its needed like at idle in traffic or maybe climbing a hill. Just another idea here is the diagram and you can purchase these switches on ebay or places like summit.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/13/2012 07:59PM by Saxist.

Attachments:
efaninstall2.gif (4.1 KB) –
efaninstall2.gif

spitlist Avatar
Joe Curry
Sahuarita, AZ, USA   usa

Here's my take on such a project.

You can add a fuse between the positive fan contact and the output of the relay. Make sure it is large enough to handle the poewr draw of the fan.
The bypass switch lets you turn on the fan manually if the thermostat fails.

Joe



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 01/13/2012 07:49PM by spitlist.
. You can hide this ad & support this site by upgrading to a Gold Membership ~ click here for more info

Attachments:
Electric Fan wiring.JPG (4.5 KB) –
Electric Fan wiring.JPG

Marcos Rodriguez
New Jersey, USA   usa
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Darla ( From The Little Rascal"

One quick question is it bad to have the fan all the time on ?
Also if I do your setup or Joes then I would need something like a probe to alert the fan of the temp ? correct and I have no clue what to get and where aside from the internet sad smiley wnted to get thisover with tonight or tomorrow, dont ask me why the rush maybe 2012thumbs up smileydrinking smiley and want to get it done and at least drive it before the end of the world

If not I have to go with all the time ON



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 01/13/2012 07:58PM by Marc69MK3.
spitfire50 Avatar
Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   usa

Hi,
I also have a pilot light in parallel with the fan motor. That way I know that it is turned on whether thermostatically or manually.
Good luck,
Paul
. You can hide this ad & support this site by upgrading to a Gold Membership ~ click here for more info
Saxist Avatar
Dave B
Valleyfield QC, Canada   can

Most of those thermostat switches are adjustable so you can set the temp threshold to your liking. I have wired up some that continue to run even after the engine is off until the temp drops.
spitlist Avatar
Joe Curry
Sahuarita, AZ, USA   usa

In reply to # 720240 by spitfire50 Hi,
I also have a pilot light in parallel with the fan motor. That way I know that it is turned on whether thermostatically or manually.
Good luck,
Paul

me too. One thing about those lights is when the fan is off but air going through the fan is spinning the blades, it makes the fan act like a generator making the light flicker a bit with the generation of electricity.

Joe
grubscrew Avatar
grub screw
The suburbs of, Winfield, Maryland, USA   usa

I assume you want to do this for what everybody seems to think is some fantastic horsepower gain?

If that's your reason, then you need to understand that the only time you see a horsepower gain that amounts to anything is when the fan isn't running, so yes, you want it to shut off (and come on) in response to temperature. So that's why you include a thermostat.

Otherwise, you'll be switching it on and off manually as you try to watch, and keep up with, the always-suspect temperature gauge on the dashboard.

Joe's set up that provides for both thermostatically controlled, and manual override, is the best.

Dave



Dave
1970 Spitfire Mk3
FDU 78359L
34/11 (Jasmine yellow/Black interior)
Saxist Avatar
Dave B
Valleyfield QC, Canada   can

I don't think its bad to have the fan on all the time but they do draw allot of power and might even dim your lights. For just a little more money you can do it up real nice ... here is a link for a kit or just look at some of the others on ebay http://www.ebay.ca/itm/185-DEGREE-FAN-THERMOSTAT-TEMPERATURE-SWITCH-RELAY-KIT-/400214167002?pt=Motors_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item5d2e9f8dda



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/13/2012 08:08PM by Saxist.
Saxist Avatar
Dave B
Valleyfield QC, Canada   can

yup exactly grub not allot of gain ...the only reason I might do it is I hate the cost of clutch fan replacements....
Falkon Avatar
Al Martin
Wisconsin, USA   usa

Joe's setup is the BEST one. The idea of an override switch is a good idea. i don't think you'd want to wire it to run w/ the engine off in a Spitfire. Too much draw on a small electrical system. Then again our wiring isn't that great either. Safer off w/ the key off.
Jerry Bryant
Palm Harbor, USA   usa

On my 80 the idle drops a little when the fan comes on haven't quite figured that one out. Does the fan draw so much power it effects the spark?
Bodge Garage Avatar
Kris Schmidt
Spokane WA, USA   usa

In reply to # 720252 by racer490 On my 80 the idle drops a little when the fan comes on haven't quite figured that one out. Does the fan draw so much power it effects the spark?


The power demand puts a load against the alternator. More load means more power needed, at idle your torque is low thus slowingthe RPM
Jerry Bryant
Palm Harbor, USA   usa

Thanks Kris
Marcos Rodriguez
New Jersey, USA   usa
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Darla ( From The Little Rascal"

In the setup that Joe offers
I have the relay the fan the /on /off switch the fuse smiling smiley
The only question is the connection to the thermostat am I getting something for that or can I just tap into the temperature sender that also displays to my gauge hot/cold ?

sorry for the dumb question
spitlist Avatar
Joe Curry
Sahuarita, AZ, USA   usa

In reply to # 720268 by Marc69MK3 In the setup that Joe offers
I have the relay the fan the /on /off switch the fuse smiling smiley
The only question is the connection to the thermostat am I getting something for that or can I just tap into the temperature sender that also displays to my gauge hot/cold ?

sorry for the dumb question

There are many thermoswitches that you can use. Most have a preset temperature at which they close. Others are adjustable. If you can find one that is the temperature you want and fits where you intend to mount it, you have everything you need. Typically, they wiull have two contacts that complete the circuit when the switch reaches the actuating temperature.

The other issue is where you mount it. Most factory units are installed in a bung on the radiator. If you have such a radiator, you are set to go. Otherwise, you can find a thermostat housing that has two ports, one for the temp gauge sensor and the other you can mount the switch. O used one on my EFI conversion to mount the coolant temp sensor for the ECU so that the idle goes down once the engine warms up.

CHeers,
Joe
Marcos Rodriguez
New Jersey, USA   usa
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Darla ( From The Little Rascal"

What do you guys think to resolve the issue
Since I dont have anywhere to put the sensor , does this sound like the road to go so that I may complete the job for the sensor part and what do you guys think of the 32mm hose fit


http://www.ebay.com/itm/SMOKED-DIGITAL-WATER-TEMP-GAUGE-RADIATOR-HOSE-SENSOR-ADAPTER-BLUE-32mm-/130630680909?_trksid=p3284.m263&_trkparms=algo%3DSI%26its%3DI%26itu%3DUCI%252BUA%252BFICS%26otn%3D21%26pmod%3D330570682647%26ps%3D54
carChips Avatar
Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   can
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"

With an adaptor, that sensor may screw into where your stock sensor is located. No need for the hose connector.



'S all for now
Vic
. You can hide this ad & support this site by upgrading to a Gold Membership ~ click here for more info

Reply to this topic or post your own questions!

Members Sign In if you've already registered, or

Register a New Account

Registration is free and takes less than a minute

Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Check the Forum Help File (FAQ) or contact the webmaster.


Join The Club

Sign in to ask questions, share photos, and access all website features

TRExp Menu

What's New

Membership

Forums ->

The Pub

Buy, Sell & Trade

Vendor Market

Spitfire & GT6

TR6 & TR250

TR7 & TR8

TR4 & TR5

TR2 & TR3

Herald & Vitesse

Stag, 2500 & 2000

Triumph Pre-War

Odds & Ends

List Archives

Motorsports

Meetup

Forum Search

Random Topic

Latest Posts

Live Chat

Calendar

Journals

Tech Library

Car Registry

Cars For Sale

Model Info

Directory

Member Map

TRExp Store

Search Site

Advertising Info

Smartphone quick link
trexp.mobi

Adjust Text Size

Larger Smaller
Reset Save