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What Did You Do To Your Spitfire or GT6 today??

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Gt-6 Mk3 Avatar
Gt-6 Mk3 Carl Webeck
Penfield, NY, USA   USA
1971 Triumph GT6 MkIII "Sparky"
Yeah - I think almost everything but sheet-metal and glass would be worth saving. Parts cars aren't $100-200 these days, for a reason. You might want to try to save (or box-up to sell) anything that is removable. Or sell the car as a parts car and someone will grab it as-is and save the cash for your '77 O&M fund.

I would assume that the general perspective of folks on this forum would be that you shouldn't let a scrapyard take the car. They'll only give you 20-40% of what you could get for it in a private sale -- and then it will be shredded and won't help serve cars on the road in the future.

Best of luck!



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-03 12:00 AM by Gt-6 Mk3.

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SpitnSawdust Avatar
SpitnSawdust Silver Member Richard Simpson
Lewes, east sussex, UK   GBR
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Little Blue"
In reply to # 1495582 by markarmfield I have a 1974 Spitfire whose frame was so bad in 1990 it broke. I parked it & have removed many parts, but it has to go. My rusty little secret was found. I have removed the dash, seat belts, top hardware, chrome bolts, screws.
Are there any other parts that are difficult to purchase that I should remove to save for my 77 Spitfire for emergency back ups?

Hi,
If you're stripped that much and you have the space you might as well tear off everything that still moves. At least get out all the fasteners washers and spacers that you can.
Have fun!
Cheers
Rich

carChips Avatar
carChips Victor Harnish
Kelowna, BC, Canada   CAN
1933 MG Magnette
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Chip"
1989 GMC Sierra 1500 "Bush Truck"
In reply to # 1495582 by markarmfield I have a 1974 Spitfire whose frame was so bad in 1990 it broke. I parked it & have removed many parts, but it has to go. My rusty little secret was found. I have removed the dash, seat belts, top hardware, chrome bolts, screws.
Are there any other parts that are difficult to purchase that I should remove to save for my 77 Spitfire for emergency back ups?


Bonnets and boot lids always seem to get messed up. Someone here was looking for bumpers, if they're not rusted.



'S all for now
Vic

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christrish Avatar
christrish Chris B
Lehi, Utah, USA   USA
Started the rubberized undercoating process on my tub ('73 Spit 1500). Cleaned the underside well with a wire brush, Scotch-brite red pad, and final solvent wash. I opted to brush it on (vs. spraying) due to time constraints and am very pleased with the results. Applied 4 coats with 3-5 minutes of flash drying between each coat per the instructions. After overnight drying it's hard as a rock. Should finish the rest of the tub bottom on Saturday. Commentary here: http://73spitfire1500.blogspot.com/2017/11/tub-starting-rubberized-undercoating.html



Working to take the "D" out of DPO since 2013
Follow my restoration progress: http://73spitfire1500.blogspot.com



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-03 10:46 AM by christrish.


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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
That looks like fun.

cbez Cole B
Fallbrook, California, USA   USA
Simple but proud of myself. Got some sticky back felt that's used for furniture and padded my door handles and boot rack. Firmed everything up and quieted down the rattles.



1971 Triumph Spitfire MK 4

mrpynk Avatar
mrpynk Silver Member Terry Mcneil
Cotati, California, USA   USA
Recently I've made a little more progress on the engine build. Not w/o a couple doh moments however....

First I discovered that the ARP hardware I used for main and rod caps posed a slight problem when it was time to fasten the front sealing block! DOH!!!!!
I had to shorten the studs and omit the thick washer to work around.
Later on I realized about 5 min. after I fastened the front plate to the block and installed the Cam that I had forgotten to install the 2 freeze plugs in the block BEHIND the front platedrinking smiley
Then it was time for a Cider....

Does the oil slinger washer on the front of the crankshaft face dished side toward block or toward cover? I would've guessed toward block, but I read in Haynes toward cover.... is that correct?
Thanks!



There's nothing square about a square-tail!

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TheLeafySpring Avatar
TheLeafySpring Cameron McNeal
Athens, Alabama, USA   USA
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Lil E.D."
Drove the spit with along with my brother in his mx5. I passed him in 4th gear full throttle at "a certain speed" and got one of the nicest compliment afterwards. He said the car sounds like a higher revving e-type with two less cylinders.

trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
Had some help for a few days over the weekend. My son from Washington was here, among all the projects he helped me build a rolling cart for the hood and trunk lid. That freed up the rolling saw horses for the body.
Off the frame and rolled out of the way. Laid all the parts on the shelves for the suspension in place.
Today I got all the rear bolted in place, some front and finished up the brakes on a friends Duesenburg kit car. He will need new pads and shoes, as the master proportioning valve hung up and froze the brakes on. Had to completely redo the whole system, but finally got him some brakes so he can bring it here for me to finish up.
While doing the rear spring there are a couple of things that all should know. I'm going to write it up in my journal.
I'm a little tired, so better get writing before nap time rolls in.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

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jjjjack Avatar
jjjjack Gold Member Jack Greene
Boston, Massachusetts, USA   USA
1967 Triumph GT6 "Wee Wee Car"
Drove the GT6 on the 50 mile round trip to the laboratory...

With us off of daylight savings time, I found myself driving home in the dark in driving rain. The 1st third of the drive was on a narrow road with lots of twists.

The car performed well, but when I pushed it too hard on the I95 to I90 onramp and the rear end broke loose briefly. Once on I90, I was in 7 miles of stop and go traffic - which took over 30 minutes. Every 5 minutes or so, the engine (which runs a little too rich) would foul the plugs and I would need to rev up the engine to clear them to prevent it from stalling. The traffic cleared at Watertown and after 10 seonds of sputtering, I was able to get the car up to 85 mph for the last 3 miles which cleared everything up..

While I really need to log some data and send it off to Rick Patton for a retune to solve the fuel issue in stop and go traffic, the drive was a complete blast!

It made me remember Danny Hopkins' review on the GT6 MkI vs the GT6 MkIII from the May-2016 issue of Practical Classics:

“The moment you wedge yourself into the bucket seat, the Mk1 promises that you are about to scare yourself. You simply have to obey the rules in a Mk1: do not lift off mid-corner, stick to smooth tarmac and when braking hard, do so in a straight line. A car of this sort should challenge the driver to a battle of high-speed wits. I get out exhilarated, intoxicated and happy to be alive.
The Mk III does a similar job but lacks the teeth of the MkI. It feels slower and yet I am switching back and forth at least 10mph faster. The MkIII is softer, more comfortable and easier to live with. It probably won’t kill you – and that’s the problem.”

Yup - that sums up the driving experience!

Jack

cbez Cole B
Fallbrook, California, USA   USA
Still chasing down carb ghosts. I feel like I run stronger with my choke on in the mornings which suggests lean. Or maybe it's just the cold exhaust note sounding better.



1971 Triumph Spitfire MK 4

SpitMan Avatar
SpitMan Doug Walls
Brandywine, Maryland, USA   USA
1970 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "70 Spit"
1998 Chevrolet Corvette "Silver Fox"
2007 Chevrolet Silverado
2013 Chevrolet Malibu "Pearl Baby"
Straightened, sanded and painted the hood frame. Probably won't put the hood covering on until late Spring after I paint the car.
But, hey, one more thing off the list! Now, where do I store it so it does not get buggered-up. Hang it from the rafters???eye rolling smiley

gtspit Ed B
Yuma, AZ, USA   USA
Great write up Jack! thumbs upthumbs up
Ah, the memories!
Now'er liven' the Triumph-dream!
The take-away from all these, we find
1. just how resilient the Triumph is,
&
2. just how resilient, we are to all the possibilities these Triumphs hand us on every drive.
smileys with beer
Keep us posted.
Ed.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1496537 by SpitMan Straightened, sanded and painted the hood frame. Probably won't put the hood covering on until late Spring after I paint the car.
But, hey, one more thing off the list! Now, where do I store it so it does not get buggered-up. Hang it from the rafters???eye rolling smiley

I slung my top to the wall of the garage with a tarp. Hung it hammock style. Worked great for me.


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dave-skip-fire-four-iv- Avatar
Oshawa, ON, Canada   CAN
Hi doug try those bicycle hooks on the pully system might work ??just an idea

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