TRExp

Spitfire & GT6 Forum

Old subject, new question 71 up Spitfire's and GT6's door handles

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, BC, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 1511041 by Bpt70gt Joe, do you still have the broken ones? Here is the pair I've drawn up but would need to physically take dimensions to make the drawing accurate. I know I can make them but I'll do it from brass, the test will be how long it takes me to make one. Love the challenge and it's cold here up north and I need a good reason to heat up the workshop.

I was thinking the same thing. But it would be nice to see the bar in situ, in the mechanism. So that critical tolerances can be seen.

I am thinking of the peg that defines left and right. If a hole could be made that takes a screw in peg, the same pattern could be used for left or right.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
OK Joe, not a big deal if you can't find the old ones. I've got plenty of other projects to play with.

Tony, you have a 1500 so you can better see how this all works. At this point I'm at a disadvantage and only going by pictures online that I could find. I've got to imagine that if the plastic ones lasted for a good number of years, that one made from aluminum or brass (my preference) would be a pretty permanent solution. Lots of questions, how much force is applied to cause the part to break, how much force is placed on the peg? Only someone with this setup can answer those questions. But then again, not a lot of owners have chimed in so maybe this isn't that big a deal.
The old saying " if it ain't broke--no need to fix it."

JOEVACS Avatar
JOEVACS Joe Carter
Hickory, NC, USA   USA
In reply to # 1511051 by Bpt70gt OK Joe, not a big deal if you can't find the old ones. I've got plenty of other projects to play with.

Tony, you have a 1500 so you can better see how this all works. At this point I'm at a disadvantage and only going by pictures online that I could find. I've got to imagine that if the plastic ones lasted for a good number of years, that one made from aluminum or brass (my preference) would be a pretty permanent solution. Lots of questions, how much force is applied to cause the part to break, how much force is placed on the peg? Only someone with this setup can answer those questions. But then again, not a lot of owners have chimed in so maybe this isn't that big a deal.
The old saying " if it ain't broke--no need to fix it."

Brian,
This is a flawed part that does need fixing. This part is a good example of why Japanese cars got a good reputation and why British cars got a bad one in the 70s. The Japanese over built most everything while the British built them "good enough". I'm to the point of helping you in this endeavor just because you are able and willing. I don't have the equipment to make these or would've done it already but if you do, I will try to supply the necessary part so you can see it and make a model.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Joe, I'm an old (very old) tool room machinist with the machines to do the work, big question is how long to make one. In my mind, no more than a couple hours but the first one always takes longer because you have to think of ways to fixture the part and figure out the tooling. Sort of like when I built the vacuum valve for the TR250. First one took me almost 8 hours but was able to cut that back to 3 hrs. after figuring it all out. Material cost is very low for this actuator, it always comes down to labor doesn't?
Once I got one made to my drawing, then we'd have to work together since my GT doesn't use this. I'd send one to you, you install it and see if improvements are needed, if needed then send it back to me with suggested improvements ETC ETC. However, I should have no problems taking dimensions off an original and I can certainly machine the part more accurately than a plastic part can be injection molded. I would think that the drivers side would be the one most frequently broken since that side is more frequently used. I do have one question you might be able to answer right away, there are "flutes cut into the side of the long shank, what do those accomplish? There is a spring that slides over that shank so the flutes confuse me unless they are there to reduce friction on the spring.

JOEVACS Avatar
JOEVACS Joe Carter
Hickory, NC, USA   USA
Spring friction reduction would be my guess too. I see no other reason other than possibly strength of the shaft ( more surface area ) or material savings.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
I can cut those flutes in the shaft but I'm thinking a coating of moly and that would keep it lubed for quite some time. We'll see.

65or66 Gold Member Jim B
Lake village, IN, USA   USA
1965 Triumph Spitfire MkII
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Jusanudda Munny Pit"
Brian, I've looked thru all my 'spares' and haven't found the set of handles I know I have. Hopefully someone else can supply you with at least one.

l'll take a few pics of the other good one tonight while I'm rebuilding it.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
JOEVACS Avatar
JOEVACS Joe Carter
Hickory, NC, USA   USA
Brian, No luck on the part. I threw all the broken ones away.

roncohudd Avatar
roncohudd Gold Member Ronald Huddleston
Muenster, TX, USA   USA
1967 Triumph Spitfire "Lucy"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkII "Lucifer"
1997 Ford Ranger "Little Red"
2001 Yamaha MC XV1600A "NOT THE HONDA"    & more
Just from another "old machinist opinion", I think they will be fine without the flutes. They are probably there for material savings.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Pictures will help but without one in my hands to measure we'll put this project on the back burner for now. Maybe it is a solution looking for a problem. I've got plenty of other projects to keep me busy until it gets warm enough to continue sanding on the hood. -5 this morning.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
OK, my brain is working overtime, I think I've come up with a way to economically make these actuators by a slight redesign, it will function the same but won't break through the hole ever again. That area seams to be the most common place to break. However, I'd still need to get hold of even a broken one so I can get all the dimensions I need, Anyone got a broken one they want to part with?
I looked at some of the used door handle assemblies on ebay and most of those are broken thru the hole.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Here is a somewhat possibility, a hybrid part. Biggest problem, no one knows what kind of forces are being applied. This part is 3D printed, then screw in a brass end part that seems to break through the hole. The best solution would be a nice complete solid brass one. Someday.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Here is a somewhat possibility, a hybrid part. Biggest problem, no one knows what kind of forces are being applied. This part is 3D printed, then screw in a brass end piece. The originals appear to break through the hole. The best solution would be a nice complete solid brass one. Someday.


Attachments:
GT6 MK3 door actuator hybrid-1.JPG    24 KB
GT6 MK3 door actuator hybrid-1.JPG

GT6 MK3 door actuator hybrid-2.JPG    27.9 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
Dale M. Avatar
Tell City, IN, USA   USA
Not sure if he’s still a member, but Steven Spangler posted about this back in 2014. He posted a picture of one made out of brass and stated that it only takes about one hour to do so. Not sure how to get ahold of him or if he still has the time or ability to do so anymore.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
A lost wax casting would be the easy way to go.

Form the original in wax - include sprew and funnel.

Immerse in plaster with funnel up.

When the plaster hardens heat it so the wax melts into the plaster leaving the plaster mold.

Pour in molten brass from a crucible.

When cooled bash the mold breaking it up to remove the casting.

Want to get fancy? Make bits oversized to machine down to size.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions




Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster