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Mark II GT6 lower wishbone issues

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JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
We're in the process of cleaning , inspecting, and installing the front and rear suspension parts on our GT6. We after cleaning the front lower wishbones ( A arms, if you will ) I found the holes that would attach them to the trunion, were not true. One side of each was ovalated and the other looked to have some wear that distorted the face where the nut or bolt would go. I figure that would give problems getting the car aligned and would make the steering loose. I looked up the cost of new ones, at Rimmer Bros and they are about 90 bucks, after conversion. About the same price at Canley Classics. Moss Motors lists them at $147 .

Are there other sources for these in good shape, or is the UK about to get more of my business ? Just for grins, are there places making them out of tube steal or aluminum for performance use ?



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Yellowhawk Valley Avatar
walla walla, washington, USA   USA
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Walla Walla"
1969 Triumph Spitfire "Portland"
1972 Triumph Spitfire MkIV "Spokane"
1975 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Dayton"    & more
Spitbits down there in Ca has them, $129.00. TRF may as well. There are a couple of specialist that sell the tubular style as well. I think one or more may provide references in the next day or so. Canley Classics also sells some custom pieces/
Dan

rustbuckit2011 Frank Zappa
auckland, auckland, New Zealand   NZL
The usual way to fix ovalated holes in the lower A arms is to weld washers to the outside, and fill the worn side of the hole with weld from the inside. Then file/drill it flat and round. The bonus is that the metal is now thicker, so wear will not be as rapid.
I am not aware of them being sold new any cheaper than the UK, and second hand spares are likely to have their own issues.
If they are straight and otherwise tidy, Id recommend just fixing them.

Sorry- just re-read your post- the distortion sounds like an issue. You'd do well to buy new



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-04 05:17 AM by rustbuckit2011.

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JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
My Dad mentioned the washer weld fix, but, I don't have welding skills.



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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1501328 by JohnW63 My Dad mentioned the washer weld fix, but, I don't have welding skills.

Washers are overkill IMHO.
The material is just mild steel, any competent shop can weld in the missing steel, grind the sides flat, and drill new round holes.

The stock wishbones are perfectly strong enough, which is why you will not find places "making them out of tube steel or aluminum for performance use".
Racers use them pretty much as is, except that the mount for the anti-roll bar link is often reinforced.
It's not appreciated, but the open C section allows the wishbone links to twist slightly, to accommodate the change in caster angle created by the
lower trunnion when the suspension moves through it's range of motion.
Some well meaning but misguided souls have boxed in the wishbone links, only to experience binding and unexplained stress cracks.

You can however find upper wishbones that feature an adjustable length ball joint assembly, these are usually made of tubular steel tube.
The purpose is to allow greater and easier adjustment of suspension camber.

https://www.canleyclassics.com/suspension-steering-and-brakes/adjustable-upper-wishbones/

There is also a trunnion to balljoint conversion available.
It replaces the stock vertical link & trunnion with a custom vertical link and spherical joint:

https://www.canleyclassics.com/suspension-steering-and-brakes/trunnionless-front-suspension-kit/

https://images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A0LEVyxzpyVaUu4ATZVXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEyZ3Z1b2hvBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDVUkyQzNfMQRzZWMDc2M-?p=spitfire+adjustable+lower+wishbones&fr=yfp-t#id=9&iurl=http%3A%2F%2Fmyweb.tiscali.co.uk%2Ftlweb%2Fgt6%2Frepmod%2Fmodifications%2Ffr_sus_images%2Flower_wb.jpg&action=click

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
In reply to a post by any competent shop can weld in the missing steel, grind the sides flat, and drill new round holes.

I need to find one of those competent shop things. I just haven't gotten any rave reviews of anyone. However, my bodyshop guy has a good welder on hand. Might be worth an ask.



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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
Good news is that such repairs do not require expert welding skills.
You are basically adding a small amount of filler material, and grinding away the excess.

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