TRExp

Spitfire & GT6 Forum

3D printing experiments

Moss Motors
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor
AutoShrine Sponsor

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Any shape you can dream up can be done.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

Attachments:
GT6 shift knob-1.jpg    7.4 KB
GT6 shift knob-1.jpg

planebow Robert Howard
Kalispell, Montana, USA   USA
I had my tail lights apart yesterday and thought of this thread. There is 2 plastic pieces inside that are partially melted, will get a pic today and see if anyone would be willing to make me 4.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
Can it do transparencies or better yet tinted?

I'm thinking hard to find tail lights for round tails.

I'm thinking of digital (possibly scanned from original) to scope in a material like wax dissolving into the mold used to cast either in plastic, metal or glass.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1501544 by Bpt70gt Any shape you can dream up can be done.


Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
It can print a transparent plastic, in fact that's the best it can do, clear filaments are not good enough--yet. There are some colored transparent filaments. It also depends on the 3D printer you have. Most you can set the % of density and that can affect how transparent the part will be. Scanning would be ideal but 3D scanners are very expensive now but I'd bet that the prices of those will come down in the near future. You could make a mold of the part using 3D printing but if you already have the part then you could use that to make the mold and pour urethane. Just a couple examples of recent prints. Printed the deer not the cat. Interesting to just think of the possibilities for our cars.


Attachments:
2017-12-07 08.10.54.jpg    29 KB
2017-12-07 08.10.54.jpg

Deer printed.JPG    40.7 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
yoda.jpg    33.3 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1501544 by Bpt70gt Any shape you can dream up can be done.

That's not strictly true yet, see this article:

http://www.digitaleng.news/de/design-3d-printing/

And even when it's possible, it's often not practical, without some redesign or modification.

Many companies that decide to try AM fail to understand the limitations of the machines, of the materials, and of the processes.
They assume that a part which was designed to be diecast, or stamped, or welded can simply be reproduced as-is using 3D.

OTOH, with 3D printing, many things are both possible and practical that are impossible or impractical with conventional fab methods.
The technology is evolving rapidly, and every day brings new and better capabilities.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Nice article Carter, I had not seen that one. Thanks. Yes, there are limitations of course but this opens up a new world for home made objects that previously we could not make use of. Just a few years ago, industry had these machines because they could afford them, now the average home enthusiast can avail themselves of this technology. There are already libraries of parts available, imagine a website for British cars where you could look up a part that you need, download the stl. file and print the part in a couple hours. No more waiting 5 days for UPS to deliver that knob, or whatever gismo you wanted. It's all soft parts now but the future is looking good. I may not see it (hard parts-metallic) but my grandsons likely will. Need a set of suspension bushings made from nylon or carbon fiber? Done in just a couple hours. Right now the printer is running a set of helicopters for my grandsons Christmas gifts among other things.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1501783 by Bpt70gt Nice article Carter, I had not seen that one. Thanks. Yes, there are limitations of course but this opens up a new world for home made objects that previously we could not make use of. Just a few years ago, industry had these machines because they could afford them, now the average home enthusiast can avail themselves of this technology. There are already libraries of parts available, imagine a website for British cars where you could look up a part that you need, download the stl. file and print the part in a couple hours. No more waiting 5 days for UPS to deliver that knob, or whatever gismo you wanted. It's all soft parts now but the future is looking good. I may not see it (hard parts-metallic) but my grandsons likely will. Need a set of suspension bushings made from nylon or carbon fiber? Done in just a couple hours. Right now the printer is running a set of helicopters for my grandsons Christmas gifts among other things.

I expect that it will be practical and cost effective to have a set of 3D printed rods in Aluminum or Titanium, in less than 5 years.
There are already Service Bureau companies that offer 3D Fab as a Service.
Email the *.stl and a Credit Card number, get the rods via FedEx.
Those rods will likely still require some secondary machining: Final tap the bolt holes, finish hone the big ends and small ends.
I'm 67, hope to be around to see that.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
I'm looking forward to the future of this.

HA!!! I'm 67 also and we're doing pretty good to even be talking about this technology, it should be the youngsters on this forum leading the charge on this topic.
Carter, you and I are a special breed. In my area schools they don't even have shop classes anymore.

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
planebow Robert Howard
Kalispell, Montana, USA   USA
The tail light part I am looking for can be printed in any color as it will be painted with chrome paint.


Attachments:
1207171351.jpg    14.6 KB
1207171351.jpg

1207171351a.jpg    13.2 KB
Sign In or Register to view this photo
Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
That part is well within the capability of 3D printing. Next hurdle would be making a 3D CAD drawing of it. Not a hard part to do at all but I'd be surprised if that part isn't available "used" from one of the forum members. Might try asking on the Buy-Sell-Trade forum. Wonder if I have the same part in my 70 GT6 tail light?? I'm not up on Spitfire models and their differences.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Carter, here is an interesting article about how J Leno is using 3D printing.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/a4354/4320759/

Mark Jones Avatar
Close to Sarnia, Ontario, Canada   CAN
1995 MG MGF "Barney"
1996 Land Rover Discovery
Wouldn't it be easier to 3D scan that tail light part and then 3D print it?





MOWOG Garage serving the needs of all Post Abingdon MG owners in Lambton Co. since 2011.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Yes Mark it would IF you have access to a 3D scanner. A good 3D scanner accurate to .005 costs $3000. There are less expensive ones but the accuracy is poor. It won't take long for the costs of the good ones to come down to where the common guy could have one. If you a scanner at work, that you could use then that's the way to go. Only takes less than 10 minutes to scan. A good scanner is a game changer for these parts.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1501831 by Bpt70gt Carter, here is an interesting article about how J Leno is using 3D printing.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/a4354/4320759/

Note the date ...

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <

To add your reply, or post your own questions

Members Sign In   or   Create an Account

Registration is FREE and takes less than a minute!


Having trouble posting or changing forum settings?
Read the Forum Help (FAQ) or contact the webmaster