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Crank nut removal

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1500113 by TR-PI If you place the transmission in 4th gear and have someone put there foot firmly on the brake pedal, you can undo the nut with a socket and bar.

If you place your entire weight on a breaker bar, it's pretty easy to create 150-250 ft-lb of torque.
Our transmissions are fragile enough, without being subjected to far more torque than the motor produces.
If you must immobilize the crankshaft, a flywheel lock is easy to make from a piece of angle iron,
and removing the starter gives full access to the flywheel to attach it.
With the pan dropped or the motor on a stand, a common 2x4 can be inserted between crankshaft and crankcase.

Been working on these cars for nearly 50 years now ...

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spits Avatar
spits paul krause
florida, USA   USA
1968 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Rusty; Gone But Not Forgotten!"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
From an objective safety perspective the starter approach is ill advised. Use an impact wrench or a breaker/cheater bar.

Best
Paul



Best,

Paul

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1500281 by spits From an objective safety perspective the starter approach is ill advised. Use an impact wrench or a breaker/cheater bar.

Best
Paul

Really?
Care to explain why?

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spits Avatar
spits paul krause
florida, USA   USA
1968 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Rusty; Gone But Not Forgotten!"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
It's obvious. How is the wrench that will be travelling at tens of feet per second retained? What keeps it from becoming a projectile?

No one needs to get hurt to repair a car.



Best,

Paul

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1500331 by spits It's obvious. How is the wrench that will be travelling at tens of feet per second retained? What keeps it from becoming a projectile?

No one needs to get hurt to repair a car.

Here's what's obvious: Behold, the box end wrench!

http://c.shld.net/rpx/i/s/i/spin/image/spin_prod_951015812?wid=140&wid=180hei=140

Also, I recommend sitting in the car when you turn the key:
1) You are 3-4 feet removed from the active area.
2) There is substantial metal structure between you and the active area.
3) The wrench swings between two substantial metal structures, the chassis members.
4) The range of motion is limited to perhaps 60 degree arc.
5) The energy that does the work is not in the wrench, it is the kinetic energy in the rotating mass of the motor.
6) Should the wrench somehow disengage from the nut, it clatters harmlessly to the floor.

But the fact is people DO get hurt repairing cars
Slipping wrenches, breaking tools, sprained muscles, skinned knuckles, sharp metal edges, slipping and falling while applying force, you name it.
Directly applying major force manually puts your soft fragile flesh and bones right into the action zone.
Sitting in the cockpit and turning the ignition switch ... not so much danger, not so much direct potential for injury.
Far safer to let Mr Electricity do the dirty work.

spits Avatar
spits paul krause
florida, USA   USA
1968 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII "Rusty; Gone But Not Forgotten!"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
Good luck. Glad to see that you can control the path of a projectile by will alone. I'll be happy to not be in your garage.

...and could you explain again about the, what is it called, a box end wrench?



Best,

Paul

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1500360 by spits Good luck. Glad to see that you can control the path of a projectile by will alone. I'll be happy to not be in your garage.

...and could you explain again about the, what is it called, a box end wrench?

It's only a projectile when it's flying through the air.
The trick is to use the right tools, do your planning, double check your work, to make sure it does not BECOME a projectile.

Been doing it that way for nearly 50 years, not a single mishap.

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trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
Box end wrench or ring spanner, a completely round 6 or 12 point wrench that surrounds the whole nut or bolt head.
Most ratcheting wrench are pretty much one, just not solid metal.
Like Carter, been doing it for 50 or more years, using a socket on a breaker bar.
Mostly it requires just a bump of the starter, but to each his own.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In the end, folks should use whatever method they feel safe doing.

The topic is 'Crank Nut Removal', and I've described a method that has always worked well for me.

You don't like the method, don't use it.

Springs are the real threat, there is enough energy to cause serious injury or death,
and every operation performed on them is right there with fingers, teeth, skulls, eyes, all in the danger zone.

But folks don't seem to get frightened because they appear benign, instead of moving around.

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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Years ago I made this tool, a chain wrench. It works by holding the pulley when both undoing and tightening the nut.


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philipheys Avatar
philipheys Phil Heys
Accrington, Lancashire, UK   GBR
Thanks guys,

As always you are all very passionate! Rest assured I will be doing the safe way but knowing me the most difficult way

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
I've always done the "braker bar braced to the floor / starter" method.

Works every time without a hitch.

Make sure you pull the coil wire first and don't do it on jack stands.

philipheys Avatar
philipheys Phil Heys
Accrington, Lancashire, UK   GBR
Ok guys got it shifted quite easy in the end I removed the starter jammed a screwdriver in the fly wheel and with a 46mm socket and large torque wrench cracked it first time.

Now can you take a look st the pictures I am guessing that I need to renew the chain what about the sprockets?

What's the procedure or better still does anyone have a video on how to do?

Thanks

philipheys Avatar
philipheys Phil Heys
Accrington, Lancashire, UK   GBR
Sorry guys forgot to attach.


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Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Just buy the kit including chain, sprockets, tensioner, oil seal gasket etc.

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