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How to know when you need a new axle u-joint.

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Herald948 Avatar
Herald948 Andrew Mace
East Nassau, upstate NY, USA   USA
In reply to # 1496934 by Doug in Vegas
In reply to # 1496859 by spitfire50 John,
Suggesting that it is a good idea to save removing the hub flange and bearings by swapping the yoke is not sensible. The effort to remove that yoke puts removing the hub to shame. The pin is only there to give someone comfort that if the splined joint comes loose something will hold the shaft in the yoke. Reality is: if the yoke will move it will shear that pin too.
All the best,
Paul

Which is why I recommend a touch here and there with a welder. That was the way I went back in 1996 and it's still going strong.

Well yeah, except that, as I recall, the effort to reassemble was pretty near the same as that to disassemble. We never saw any evidence that separation was likely to happen. And even if it did, that's what the roll pin is for!



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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1496942 by Herald948
In reply to # 1496934 by Doug in Vegas
In reply to # 1496859 by spitfire50 John,
Suggesting that it is a good idea to save removing the hub flange and bearings by swapping the yoke is not sensible. The effort to remove that yoke puts removing the hub to shame. The pin is only there to give someone comfort that if the splined joint comes loose something will hold the shaft in the yoke. Reality is: if the yoke will move it will shear that pin too.
All the best,
Paul

Which is why I recommend a touch here and there with a welder. That was the way I went back in 1996 and it's still going strong.

Well yeah, except that, as I recall, the effort to reassemble was pretty near the same as that to disassemble. We never saw any evidence that separation was likely to happen. And even if it did, that's what the roll pin is for!

My yoke replacement went pretty well.

I mototooled away the part they hammered over and used a pin drift on the other side.

The new yoke went on and lined up with a few taps. Pin went in fine. I still nailed it with the welder to make sure.

A whole lot easier than tearing down the hub.

spitfire50 Avatar
spitfire50 Paul Mugford
Rochester, N.H., USA   USA
In reply to # 1496953 by Doug in Vegas
In reply to # 1496942 by Herald948
In reply to # 1496934 by Doug in Vegas
In reply to # 1496859 by spitfire50 John,
Suggesting that it is a good idea to save removing the hub flange and bearings by swapping the yoke is not sensible. The effort to remove that yoke puts removing the hub to shame. The pin is only there to give someone comfort that if the splined joint comes loose something will hold the shaft in the yoke. Reality is: if the yoke will move it will shear that pin too.
All the best,
Paul

Which is why I recommend a touch here and there with a welder. That was the way I went back in 1996 and it's still going strong.

Well yeah, except that, as I recall, the effort to reassemble was pretty near the same as that to disassemble. We never saw any evidence that separation was likely to happen. And even if it did, that's what the roll pin is for!

My yoke replacement went pretty well.

I mototooled away the part they hammered over and used a pin drift on the other side.

The new yoke went on and lined up with a few taps. Pin went in fine. I still nailed it with the welder to make sure.

A whole lot easier than tearing down the hub.
Doug,
If that yoke went onto the axle shaft as easy as that it isn't on there tight enough. Seriously, most small hydraulic shop presses won't put the yoke fully onto the shaft.
Like Andy BTDT. It takes a lot of determination and a good (?) dose of ignorance to do that job if the parts are fitting right.
All the best,
Paul

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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1497008 by spitfire50
In reply to # 1496953 by Doug in Vegas
In reply to # 1496942 by Herald948
In reply to # 1496934 by Doug in Vegas
In reply to # 1496859 by spitfire50 John,
Suggesting that it is a good idea to save removing the hub flange and bearings by swapping the yoke is not sensible. The effort to remove that yoke puts removing the hub to shame. The pin is only there to give someone comfort that if the splined joint comes loose something will hold the shaft in the yoke. Reality is: if the yoke will move it will shear that pin too.
All the best,
Paul

Which is why I recommend a touch here and there with a welder. That was the way I went back in 1996 and it's still going strong.

Well yeah, except that, as I recall, the effort to reassemble was pretty near the same as that to disassemble. We never saw any evidence that separation was likely to happen. And even if it did, that's what the roll pin is for!

My yoke replacement went pretty well.

I mototooled away the part they hammered over and used a pin drift on the other side.

The new yoke went on and lined up with a few taps. Pin went in fine. I still nailed it with the welder to make sure.

A whole lot easier than tearing down the hub.
Doug,
If that yoke went onto the axle shaft as easy as that it isn't on there tight enough. Seriously, most small hydraulic shop presses won't put the yoke fully onto the shaft.
Like Andy BTDT. It takes a lot of determination and a good (?) dose of ignorance to do that job if the parts are fitting right.
All the best,
Paul

Did I mention the "taps" were with a BFH? winking smiley

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