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Stromberg rebuild kits ?

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byakk0 Avatar
byakk0 Hazen Wardle
Boise, ID, USA   USA
some models don't have brass tags. You may find a number stamped on the top of the body itself instead. one with F and one with R (front and rear)



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~Hazen.

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65or66 Gold Member Jim B
Lake village, IN, USA   USA
1965 Triumph Spitfire MkII
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Jusanudda Munny Pit"
a number of the carb kits include all the gaskets to rebuild (almost) any Stromberg CD carb. Easier and cheaper for the vendor to stock one part number for most carbs than a bunch of different part number kits. The last kit I got was from Royze.

After you're done, you'll have a bunch of gaskets that you didn't use. It's a good idea to match up the proper gaskets as you're tearing down each carb, to make sure you put the proper gasket back in the proper place. It does matter, since the wrong gasket can cover up an important vacuum passage or port and will cause problems trying to tune later.

Also, get the separate kits for the Deceleration Bypass valves. Not included in the regular kit, and probably in need of attention by now.

Basically, follow Dave B's recommendations...I did. thumbs up

DerbyRam54 Neville Wardle
Branford, CT, USA   USA
As far as identifying exactly which carb you have, in the absence of a brass tag you can follow Hazen's advice and examine the body for any identifying information or you can look at the needle and use that. According to the Burlen reference catalogue, CDSE carbs fitted to the GT6 had one of the following needles: B5CF, B5AJ, B5AH

I am not sure how vital that knowledge is considering what you appear to be proposing to do. They all use the same gasket pack, so if all you are doing is a clean and reassemble then you can't really go wrong getting a fairly generic service kit and doing as Jim suggests. There are two different rebuild kits, but a rebuild really suggests you are replacing the throttle spindle and so on, not just cleaning and reassembling.

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JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
I plan on really going through these. I have no idea how long they have been sitting around, covered if grime, old gas turning into varnish, etc. I can't get the needle out of the cylinder part of the carb to check any numbers. I may have to soak the whole part in some sort of solvent.



Home of the 1969 GT6+ MK II resurrection project
and a sorry looking 1968 GT6+ parts car trying to stay whole.

DerbyRam54 Neville Wardle
Branford, CT, USA   USA
You might also consider dunking them in Pinesol. Don't laugh, it does a very good job of cleaning things up and doesn't affect anything plastic that you may have left in place.
Here's some heat mass parts off a thermo starter from my 1980 MGB, scrubbed up nicely with a Pinesol bath and then a bit of work with an old toothbrush.


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65or66 Gold Member Jim B
Lake village, IN, USA   USA
1965 Triumph Spitfire MkII
1973 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Jusanudda Munny Pit"
have a look at Buckeye Triumphs web site. There is a great 3-part series on rebuilding Strombergs. I believe it's under the Technical drop down menu. It's for a CD175 and TR6, but they look identical, and all the info applies. If you take the time to read through it all, you'll have a much better understanding of the operation and adjustment of your carbs. Hint-not something you can do on your cell-phone driving to work in trafficgrinning smiley

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
I looked at JoeCurto.com and tried to see if there was any visible difference in the 150CD and CDSE carbs. With the exception of different letters stamped on some parts, I couldn't see any. After reading a little of the blog that was posted above on the carbs, I wonder if I have carbs that have adjustable needles, which requires removing a screw from the top to remove the needle.

If the carb kits are good for both carbs, I may just order two kits and see. I need to read the full three pages of the carb tech pages.



Home of the 1969 GT6+ MK II resurrection project
and a sorry looking 1968 GT6+ parts car trying to stay whole.

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byakk0 Avatar
byakk0 Hazen Wardle
Boise, ID, USA   USA
take a lot of pics of your carbs and post them.

But, prob the easiest way to tell if you have adjustable needles is to look at the bottom of the carb. If you see a brass cap about the size of a quarter you should have adjustables. If you see a brass thumb screw set in a hex shank it will be fixed needles as the jet adjusts from the bottom.

Brass cap


Bottom adjustable




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~Hazen.

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
I have the brass cap type.



I have gotten them a bit cleaner. Clean enough to take apart and work on, anyway.





Home of the 1969 GT6+ MK II resurrection project
and a sorry looking 1968 GT6+ parts car trying to stay whole.

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Outfect Avatar
Outfect Dave B
La Sal, UT, USA   USA
1940 Ford N Series Tractors "Henry"
1951 Other Not Listed "SnowMan"
1979 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "White October"
1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Tangerine Dream"
John,

Those are solid brass plugs not the plastic brass cap type. And very nice ones
that haven't been buggered up yet. They often indicate non-adjustable biased needles.
But the only way to be sure is look for the hex key inside the damper. Also the type of
set screw in the piston will tell you which it is.


DaveInUtah


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JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
In reply to a post by Also the type of set screw in the piston will tell you which it is.

What do I look for ? I have one out, but the needle won't slide out. The spring moves freely, but the housing that looks to come out with the spring won't budge.



Home of the 1969 GT6+ MK II resurrection project
and a sorry looking 1968 GT6+ parts car trying to stay whole.

Outfect Avatar
Outfect Dave B
La Sal, UT, USA   USA
1940 Ford N Series Tractors "Henry"
1951 Other Not Listed "SnowMan"
1979 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "White October"
1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Tangerine Dream"
John,

You can look down into the damper tube on the piston.
It's either solid in the bottom or has a hex nut. Also, the set
screw that holds in the needle. They are different. Non-adjustable
needles use a plain set screw. Adjustable needles have a
spring loaded pin.

If it's adjustable you can drive the needle out the top with a small pipe or
tube. If it's non-adjustable you'll just have to soak it in something
to loosen it up.


DaveInUtah



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-11 06:46 PM by Outfect.

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
I think it was a simple set screw. I'll start the soaking process.



Home of the 1969 GT6+ MK II resurrection project
and a sorry looking 1968 GT6+ parts car trying to stay whole.

DerbyRam54 Neville Wardle
Branford, CT, USA   USA
I dug out some spare parts to photograph in hopes that it might assist you. These are of an adjustable metering needle off a CD4T, but if your carbs have an adjustable needle the parts should be similar if not the same.

The photo with three objects in it show the needle and its carrier, the grub screw and the adjuster. The grub screw is, as Dave has said, sprung loaded. It acts like a plunger and the purpose is to stop the needle from rotating while it is being adjusted by engaging with the slot that you can see in the carrier. The adjuster screws into the carrier, turning it raises or lowers the needle. There isn't a lot of adjustment and it is possible to unscrew the adjuster altogether. The needle would be retained in the piston by the grub screw.
I flipped the adjuster over, you can see the hex (badly chewed up) where your adjusting allen key would engage. This one had been too badly chewed up to adjust and the whole assembly was well and truly seized in the piston rod, be patient with your soaking.
Finally the other view shows how the needle is retained in the carrier. It all fits in from the top and then a little tang is bent over to retain it all.

Edit: I should also have pointed out that there is an o-ring around the lip of the adjuster, wear on that is what causes leakage of the damper oil.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-12-11 05:56 PM by DerbyRam54.


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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, NV, USA   USA
This:



Is where someone I knew jammed in aluminum foil in an attempt to lower the needle to lean out the mixture.

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