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Suspension kits: Go with stock or Poly bushings ?

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Spitfirejoe Avatar
Spitfirejoe Joe Guinan
Fremont, Nebraska, USA   USA
1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "The Phoenix"
I'm on the poly bandwagon. I actually doubt that anyone can really tell the difference in the ride and handling characteristics between a car on poly bushings and one on stock rubber bushings. Maybe steering rack mounts would be noticeably different in feel. I accept that people are sincere about their impressions, but wonder if those impressions would be overturned in a true blind test. Also, poly should last a lot longer, no?



Joe Guinan
Fremont, Nebraska

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
Below is a list of all the high performance production supercars that use poly suspension bushings:

Herald948 Avatar
Herald948 Andrew Mace
East Nassau, upstate NY, USA   USA
In reply to # 1496744 by clshore Below is a list of all the high performance production supercars that use poly suspension bushings:






You forgot


winking smiley



http://www.fairpoint.net/~herald948/database/

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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
Poly survives road salt better than black rubber.

Not an issue for a fair weather car.

On the other hand you might go for poly if you are chroming your distributor.

IanF Ian Furqueron
Croydon, PA, USA   USA
Poly can be good, but it should be noted they function differently than rubber in most suspension applications. The rubber bushings generally twist as the suspension goes through its motions - this is why you can't do the final tightening of the suspension until the car is on the ground and the suspension has settled.

Poly bushings act more like a bearing. In the control arms, the poly part itself will generally rotate with the control arm. The inner sleeve, however, is tightened about the bracket and will rotate inside the bushing. This needs to be greased or it will squeak like crazy. If dirt and grime gets into the grease and isn't cleaned out, it will eventually wear the bushing.

Poly bushings won't deteriorate like rubber bushings, but they do require more regular maintenance of removal and re-greasing. For most of our cars, driven limited miles and usually in good weather, it's not a problem.



"Lisle" - '72 GT6 basically stock and original. For now... T-9 conversion pending.
"Winnie the Poo" - '79 Spitfire 1500. Rubber to chrome bumper conversion, otherwise stock at the moment.

trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
I have been torn between the poly and standard and looked at all the places I thought needed help and those that would give a better feel or drive in a Spit6. Added weight and distribution of such, as all the bushing for the GT6 are the same as the Spitfire.
So I'm trying to put restrictions in movement in stress areas due to difference .
One problem we all have is the plastic trunnions front and rear. Hard rubber might have been a good choice in the rear, a ball joint in the front. Over the winter, I might see if I can find a bushing out of a Ford or something that will fit in the rear. Good friends run a parts house and I could take a chair and spend a cold rainy day going othrough the catalogs after taking all the measurements. Something a little oversize in either direction could be made to work. Never looked at the racing parts houses, someone may have already done this research.
I need another project.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
Thanks for the observations. I was leaning toward the rubber version, but my concern is we live is a rather low humidity location which has a large swing in temps. From below freezing a few times to over 100 rather often in the summer. I was thinking poly would be more durable. However, all the modern cars on the road are still using rubber, AND, I don't think we need a harsher ride for just a street driven car. I'll look for a deal on a rubber bushing kit.

Any idea why I don't see many rear suspension kits ?



Home of the 1968 GT6+ MK II resurrection project

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
Note that the cars were developed for the British Domestic Market, whose temperature swings exceed yours.
The GT6+ was never built in large numbers, you may find some English specialty vendors that carry the parts you seek.
But there's nothing magical about these bushings.
The materials are widely available.
Anyone with a manual lathe could easily reproduce them.

trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
Carter, you are right of course and they are so widely available, except the rotoflex ones are not the best fit from some vendors. I went to Rimmer and they still needed a little fitting on the last two I did.
I did find some competition bushings for the top A arms on the TR6, been so long I forgot the numbers, I did a write up on the BCF, but what are the odds on finding it. I'll look.
The area between the sleeve and the wall of the hub is so thin, that is where the problem will lie. Just thinking, so no one is hurt.
Not trying to reinvent the wheel here, as the plastic will properly out last me on this car.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

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Lizzard d id
san jose, ca, USA   USA
In reply to # 1496802 by trrdster One problem we all have is the plastic trunnions front and rear. Hard rubber might have been a good choice in the rear, a ball joint in the front. Over the winter, I might see if I can find a bushing out of a Ford or something that will fit in the rear.
I need another project.

https://www.google.com/search?ei=eYUEWoaAH8qs0gK9nbqoAw&q=diy+polyurethane+motor+mounts&oq=making+urathane+bushings&gs_l=psy-ab.1.2.0i71k1l4.0.0.0.126713.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0..0.0....0...1..64.psy-ab..0.0.0....0.5mupTfd6KpU

trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
All, here is the results on my research.
Sleeve length 1.990 inches, inside diameter 3/4 inch, sleeve diameter .556, bolt 7/16 inch.
I found a bushing at Energy Suspension, black one, as it has graphite impregnated in it, red does not.
Part number 9 9176
length 2 inches, a little crush room, inside diameter 1/2 inch, outside diameter .871, it does not come with a sleeve so I will have to use my old one. Our sleeve being larger will require a bit of grinding with fine sandpaper to make it a tight fit, here's hoping on that, surely it will press in.
The length did not include the outer dish on one side, so I will cut it in half and use it on the other end for a small bit of cushion on both ends.
The order was for 4 bushings and will do 2 Spitfire rears. Or if the front trunnion is the same size or shorter, it will do the whole car.
We shall see, if not, no big deal $17 and some time. Being new plastic ones in there now, just a matter of being careful taking them out, if this was not a good idea.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1496939 by trrdster All, here is the results on my research.
Sleeve length 1.990 inches, inside diameter 3/4 inch, sleeve diameter .556, bolt 7/16 inch.
I found a bushing at Energy Suspension, black one, as it has graphite impregnated in it, red does not.
Part number 9 9176
length 2 inches, a little crush room, inside diameter 1/2 inch, outside diameter .871, it does not come with a sleeve so I will have to use my old one. Our sleeve being larger will require a bit of grinding with fine sandpaper to make it a tight fit, here's hoping on that, surely it will press in.
The length did not include the outer dish on one side, so I will cut it in half and use it on the other end for a small bit of cushion on both ends.
The order was for 4 bushings and will do 2 Spitfire rears. Or if the front trunnion is the same size or shorter, it will do the whole car.
We shall see, if not, no big deal $17 and some time. Being new plastic ones in there now, just a matter of being careful taking them out, if this was not a good idea.

Don't forget the spring buttons and a good greasing of the leaves. I use motorcycle chain lube.

trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
Hi Doug, already done, I had the old rubber ones and new silicone, went with new.
I'm hoping to do this by taking out the trunnion bolt and bottom shock bolt, as the body is off. I will start a new thread when the time comes.
I really wanted to go red, but was surprised that the black contained a graphite lubricate. That has got to be a plus where these are located. The thickness of the rubber is less than a 1/4 inch all around, so feeling the difference might be iffy.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
I just raised the car, took off the rear wheels and tapped in a crowbar between the leaves to change mine. Didn't take long either.

trrdster Avatar
trrdster Wayne Tate
Spencer, NC, USA   USA
Doug, did it get rid of any negative camber?
I've seen them worn to almost gone, wonder how many owners know they ago bad and how easy they are to fix.



Wayne
1970 TR6
2000 Jaguar XK8
1949 Triumph Roadster 2000
1978 Spitfire (rust victim)
1971 GT6 (tarp covered for 12 years, rusted inside out)
1980 Spitfire (getting all the good GT6 parts, all poly suspension and Spax shocks)

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