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Distributor rebuild?

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Distributor rebuild?
#1
  This topic is about my 1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII
dplass Avatar
dplass Silver Member David P
Merrick, New York, USA   USA
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "The Beast"
2011 Ford Fusion
I've got the Delco Remy D204 on The Beast and I want to rebuild it. Three reasons:
* The oil felt under the centrifuge weights is disintegrated
* To replace the springs on the weights
* To be able to effectively clean it (derust and/or repaint)

In the manual it describes how to disassemble it: remove the staked plug (over the tach drive) and tap out the coupling pin. (#22 and #19 in the diagram, below)

The problem I'm having is that there these parts seem to be NLA:
* The staked plug
* The coupling pin

And the springs themselves are difficult to find as well.

Are there any known substitutes for these?

The staked plug looks like a block (freeze) plug but it's unclear how different it is from one.

The coupling pin is more difficult to ascertain. Is it just a pin that you peen over when reassembling? Closer inspection looks like there may be a key that keeps the pin in, but it's difficult to tell.

Thanks for listening and any help. (I did search the archives and could only find others asking the same questions.)



-D

1972 GT6 MK3 "The Beast"



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-31 09:48 PM by dplass.

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dizzy.jpg

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
Re-use the old plug, stake it in a different place on the circumference of the tach drive housing.

For the pin, use a Brass pin (hardware store plumbing dept) and peen the ends.

Don't forget the bushings. Oilite bushings are available. If the shaft is worn, use an extra or longer bushing that will bare on an un-worn part of the distributor shaft.

Cut the felt from a Dr Scholes in-sole.

dplass Avatar
dplass Silver Member David P
Merrick, New York, USA   USA
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "The Beast"
2011 Ford Fusion
Great, thank you for the tips. I did forget about the bushings!

In reply to # 1495261 by Tonyfixit Re-use the old plug, stake it in a different place on the circumference of the tach drive housing.

For the pin, use a Brass pin (hardware store plumbing dept) and peen the ends.

Don't forget the bushings. Oilite bushings are available. If the shaft is worn, use an extra or longer bushing that will bare on an un-worn part of the distributor shaft.

Cut the felt from a Dr Scholes in-sole.



-D

1972 GT6 MK3 "The Beast"

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
The springs are common as dirt, Delco built millions of those distributors used on many different cars.
You don't think they wound special springs just for Spitfires do you?
No, they grabbed the springs off the shelf to match the requirements Triumph specified.

Most FLAPS will have sets of springs of different strength, hot rodders use them to fine tune the advance curve.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/mrg-928g/overview/

Or, you can try to find the specific replacements for your specific distributor from Delco.

But let me ask, have you actually tested your dizzy to see if the advance is working properly?
If it's working OK, maybe just clean and lubricate and leave it alone.

All you need is a timing light and a tachometer.
Disconnect and plug the vac advance, and write down the advance at 500 RPM intervals.

Springs don't really wear, it's the pivot points of the weights that wear.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Dave, your illustration depicts the D202 distributor as described on page 6-130. The D204 is on page 6-205 and described on page 6-201. Similar construction but the D204 is the emission distributor with the dual acting vacuum module. The dual action vacuum module is very likely not working after 47 years and made from unobtainium. This winter I'll be rebuilding a D204 as a spare for my GT6. There are a number of tutorials online to guide you in the rebuild of your distributor. I plan to reuse the staked plug and make a new pin.

Mark Jones Avatar
Close to Sarnia, Ontario, Canada   CAN
1995 MG MGF "Barney"
1996 Land Rover Discovery
Try Jeff at Advanced Distributors





MOWOG Garage serving the needs of all Post Abingdon MG owners in Lambton Co. since 2011.

dplass Avatar
dplass Silver Member David P
Merrick, New York, USA   USA
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "The Beast"
2011 Ford Fusion
I don't know anything about spring strength. I haven't run the engine yet so I don't know if the advance works. But physically manipulating the mechanism makes it move, so it's not seized at least.

I'll clean and lube the springs and try it before replacing.


In reply to # 1495293 by clshore The springs are common as dirt, Delco built millions of those distributors used on many different cars.
You don't think they wound special springs just for Spitfires do you?
No, they grabbed the springs off the shelf to match the requirements Triumph specified.

Most FLAPS will have sets of springs of different strength, hot rodders use them to fine tune the advance curve.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/mrg-928g/overview/

Or, you can try to find the specific replacements for your specific distributor from Delco.

But let me ask, have you actually tested your dizzy to see if the advance is working properly?
If it's working OK, maybe just clean and lubricate and leave it alone.

All you need is a timing light and a tachometer.
Disconnect and plug the vac advance, and write down the advance at 500 RPM intervals.

Springs don't really wear, it's the pivot points of the weights that wear.



-D

1972 GT6 MK3 "The Beast"

. Hide banner ads & support this website by becoming a > Gold Supporting Member <
dplass Avatar
dplass Silver Member David P
Merrick, New York, USA   USA
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "The Beast"
2011 Ford Fusion
Yeah, I pulled the wrong photo, mostly because I'm lazy. The salient parts (19 & 22) are the same.

My D204 has the retard only and is not working (the PO disconnected it long ago).

TBH I only looked online for the parts themselves and not for the tutorials. *facepalm*

In reply to # 1495294 by Bpt70gt Dave, your illustration depicts the D202 distributor as described on page 6-130. The D204 is on page 6-205 and described on page 6-201. Similar construction but the D204 is the emission distributor with the dual acting vacuum module. The dual action vacuum module is very likely not working after 47 years and made from unobtainium. This winter I'll be rebuilding a D204 as a spare for my GT6. There are a number of tutorials online to guide you in the rebuild of your distributor. I plan to reuse the staked plug and make a new pin.



-D

1972 GT6 MK3 "The Beast"

dplass Avatar
dplass Silver Member David P
Merrick, New York, USA   USA
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "The Beast"
2011 Ford Fusion
I'd prefer to do it myself; working on The Beast is my hobby!

In reply to # 1495295 by Mark Jones Try Jeff at Advanced Distributors



-D

1972 GT6 MK3 "The Beast"

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
I've done them, but I had access to machine tools.
The biggest gain is better timing accuracy from eliminating the slop due to wear.
The slop creates timing jitter (or scatter), of up to several degrees.
Worn bushings can be replaced, but worn shafts are more difficult to deal with.
Consider a speedi-sleeve or similar in such cases.
An adjustable hand reamer allows you to tailor the bushing clearance to exactly match the shaft.

SpiTazz72 Avatar
SpiTazz72 Bryan H
Magnolia, Texas, USA   USA
I like the idea of Brass pin (hardware store plumbing dept) and felt from a Dr Scholes in-sole. smiling smiley

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
I bought new bushings, but found that the shaft was worn also.

Owners do tend to forget oiling the distributor.

However, there is lots of room for longer or multiple bushings to be fitted, I found suitable Oillite Bronze bushings locally that fitted without reaming.

Timing scatter is inherant with these distributors to some degree. The only way to eliminate it is to convert to electronic ignition.

If the shaft is removed from the distributor it is not difficult to turn or grind off the points cam lobes. This will allow a reluctor for an OE Hall effect pick up to be fitted to the shaft. I have used Nippondensoparts from 4 and 6 cyl Toyota's. The fit is perfect .


Attachments:
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IMG_20170913_223545.jpg

14GPDJENGINEERING Avatar
Silver Spring, MD, USA   USA
I have used a 3/16 roll pin for coupling.

Also see this regarding the plug. ============= http://www.triumphexp.com/phorum/read.php?5,1411455



Dennis smiling smiley



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-01 02:08 PM by 14GPDJENGINEERING.

Tonyfixit Avatar
Tonyfixit Tony M
Duncan, British Columbia, Canada   CAN
In reply to # 1495342 by 14GPDJENGINEERING I have used a 3/16 roll pin for coupling.

Also see this regarding the plug. ============= http://www.triumphexp.com/phorum/read.php?5,1411455

Geezz,
That disc. It's a round piece of metal about the size of punch-outs in metal electrical boxes. Some currency might fit also. Should not be such a big deal eye rolling smiley

dplass Avatar
dplass Silver Member David P
Merrick, New York, USA   USA
1972 Triumph GT6 MkIII "The Beast"
2011 Ford Fusion
Indeed. Should not be such a big deal, yet somehow the littlest things become the biggest deals, sometimes. smileys with beer

I myself can't see the staking at all. Looks completely smooth all the way around, nor can I determine a non-destructive way to get it out. I'm tempted to just puncture it and replace it with a coin at this point!

In reply to # 1495423 by Tonyfixit
In reply to # 1495342 by 14GPDJENGINEERING I have used a 3/16 roll pin for coupling.

Also see this regarding the plug. ============= http://www.triumphexp.com/phorum/read.php?5,1411455

Geezz,
That disc. It's a round piece of metal about the size of punch-outs in metal electrical boxes. Some currency might fit also. Should not be such a big deal eye rolling smiley



-D

1972 GT6 MK3 "The Beast"

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