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Alternate source for CV conversion kit ?

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JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
I just read this page:
https://www.canleyclassics.com/differential-and-driveshafts/rotoflex-vitesse-gt6-cv-conversion-kit

They no longer make them ! I wasn't ready to start the project, earlier this year. Is there any vendors who still have this product they may have gotten from Canley ?



Home of the 1968 GT6+ MK II resurrection project

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Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
WOW, that shocked me a bit. I have mine but that declaration set me back. There are or were two alternatives but I don't know if they are still available or not. Nick Jones in the UK used to provide a CV conversion and a guy out in the Midwest USA used to make one but that's all I recall. A few other people have invented their own but I don't think they went into any production for others.
Rimmer Brothers get theirs from Canley and they show them in stock, for now anyway, so you'd better jump on them while they have them.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
The supply of outer CV stub axle that goes to the vertical link likely has disappeared.
These were from the Triumph 1300 FWD, which was not produced in great volume.
All of the spares and used ones have likely been found and sold off in kits.

There are many other CV axle bits from various cars that could be fitted, but require some
engineering and custom machining, rather than the 'bolt-in' convenience of the kit.

Many newer cars use sealed 'unit bearings' in the vertical link, rather than loose roller and races.
The problem will be hub flanges to match the Spitfire/GT6 4 x 3.75" wheel pattern.
One alternative is to switch to different wheels, 4 x 100 mm are very common, and
adaptors for the front wheels are available and inexpensive.
Or, since machining is already required, have the replacements drilled for the Spitfire pattern.

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Mark Jones Avatar
Close to Sarnia, Ontario, Canada   CAN
1995 MG MGF "Barney"
1996 Land Rover Discovery
Rimmer Bros has 8 CV conversions kits in stock, RG1314.

Maybe you can adapted the rear hub assembly from an MGF/TF, which uses the same bolt pattern.





MOWOG Garage serving the needs of all Post Abingdon MG owners in Lambton Co. since 2011.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1495292 by Mark Jones Rimmer Bros has 8 CV conversions kits in stock, RG1314.

Maybe you can adapted the rear hub assembly from an MGF/TF, which uses the same bolt pattern.

Sure, because they are so common in the USA.
Or Canada for that matter.

Mark Jones Avatar
Close to Sarnia, Ontario, Canada   CAN
1995 MG MGF "Barney"
1996 Land Rover Discovery
Thanks Carter, sarcasm appreciated.





MOWOG Garage serving the needs of all Post Abingdon MG owners in Lambton Co. since 2011.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-11-01 10:29 AM by Mark Jones.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1495297 by Mark Jones Thanks Carter, sarcasm appreciated.

Just a 'cheeky' observation.
The Canley kit is probably far more rare than MGF in North America.
If you needed a replacement Triumph outer stub axle from a FWD 1300, you would be a lot more
screwed than if you needed the same part for an MGF.

I'll be looking for donor parts from cars that were built in volume and are easily and cheaply available: Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Ford, GM, etc.
Fortunately, most CV axles are built from modular components, and if you cannot find an off the shelf part,
existing shaft can be modified to work at reasonable cost.

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IanF Ian Furqueron
Croydon, PA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1495292 by Mark Jones Rimmer Bros has 8 CV conversions kits in stock, RG1314.

Maybe you can adapted the rear hub assembly from an MGF/TF, which uses the same bolt pattern.

Correction. 6 kits. spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

I'm tired of thinking about buying stuff like this and then a few years from now going, "why the hell didn't I buy that when I had the chance? angry smiley "



"Lisle" - '72 GT6 basically stock and original. For now... T-9 conversion pending.
"Winnie the Poo" - '79 Spitfire 1500. Rubber to chrome bumper conversion, otherwise stock at the moment.

Bpt70gt Avatar
Bpt70gt Brian T
Westmoreland, NH, USA   USA
Good decision Ian, I think you'll not regret it. I'm still in my GT restoration but I've done the conversion and others on this forum that have done it and are using it say it's very worth the costs and efforts.

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RobTAR Robert I
Seattle, WA, USA   USA
In reply to # 1495327 by IanF
In reply to # 1495292 by Mark Jones Rimmer Bros has 8 CV conversions kits in stock, RG1314.

Maybe you can adapted the rear hub assembly from an MGF/TF, which uses the same bolt pattern.

Correction. 6 kits. spinning smiley sticking its tongue out

I'm tired of thinking about buying stuff like this and then a few years from now going, "why the hell didn't I buy that when I had the chance? angry smiley "

4 now.... I feel ya on the holding off part. I just ordered $1200 in body panels from Rimmers during the 15% sale, I decided to wait on the axles because I get a bit of anxiety when I spend too much at once on these cars. Now I'm kicking myself for paying 15% more than I could have.

IanF Ian Furqueron
Croydon, PA, USA   USA
Same here... I got (and ignored) the same 15% off emails... Doh!! eye rolling smiley



"Lisle" - '72 GT6 basically stock and original. For now... T-9 conversion pending.
"Winnie the Poo" - '79 Spitfire 1500. Rubber to chrome bumper conversion, otherwise stock at the moment.

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
I tried to get one ordered, and the site stopped working ! Did you guys crash the site ?? smiling smiley

I'd call and order one , but it's 8pm in England.



Home of the 1968 GT6+ MK II resurrection project

IanF Ian Furqueron
Croydon, PA, USA   USA
I dunno... I did receive an order confirmation email, but not an "order shipped" email yet.

The annoying part is I really want to convert the cars to a R160 rear diff, so I mainly just need the CV's at the hub.



"Lisle" - '72 GT6 basically stock and original. For now... T-9 conversion pending.
"Winnie the Poo" - '79 Spitfire 1500. Rubber to chrome bumper conversion, otherwise stock at the moment.

JohnW63 John Williamson
Apple Valley, CA, USA   USA
"I'll be looking for donor parts from cars that were built in volume and are easily and cheaply available: Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Ford, GM, etc.
Fortunately, most CV axles are built from modular components, and if you cannot find an off the shelf part,
existing shaft can be modified to work at reasonable cost. "

How would you figure out what axles would fit for length and spline grooves and all the little measurements that would need to be right ?



Home of the 1968 GT6+ MK II resurrection project

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1495433 by JohnW63 "I'll be looking for donor parts from cars that were built in volume and are easily and cheaply available: Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Ford, GM, etc.
Fortunately, most CV axles are built from modular components, and if you cannot find an off the shelf part,
existing shaft can be modified to work at reasonable cost. "

How would you figure out what axles would fit for length and spline grooves and all the little measurements that would need to be right ?

What is remarkable is not how different all the CV axles are, it is how much alike they are inside.

There are only a few major CV component manufacturers worldwide.
CV joints themselves are pretty standardized, the shafts are what is usually the difference.
Splines are also pretty standardized, as well as drive flanges, configurations, etc.
The OEM bean counters hate custom parts, they cost more, and so engineers try to order 'off the rack' whenever possible.

You must measure the max and min distance required between inner and outer CV joints through entire the range of possible suspension movement.
This is commonly referred to as the 'plunge'.

There are catalogs of available CV joints and axles, along with the technical specs, allowing you to determine what can be mixed'n'matched
to create an axle assembly for your needs, and what shafts can be modified if needed.

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