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Ceramic Coating Headers Data

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GarrettWendt Avatar
GarrettWendt Garrett Wendt
Pittsford, New York, USA   USA
I am about to pull the trigger on Ceramic Coating my SS Headers before I finally put my puzzle back together with a mikuni conversion...

Does anyone have any Data on the temperature reduction this will bring? Even if it is anecdotal data...has anyone measured before and after temps?

Would be helpful to know!

THANKS!

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GarrettWendt Avatar
GarrettWendt Garrett Wendt
Pittsford, New York, USA   USA
126 views and nothing?

Did I stump the Forum??!! eye popping smiley

I didn't know that was possible! lol.

HuffDaddy Avatar
HuffDaddy Scott H
Charlotte, NC, USA   USA
1976 Triumph TR6 "Huff Daddy"
Garrett,
I recently saw a Velocity Channel episode of Wheeler Dealer and the ceramic coating should reduce heat in the engine well by roughly 20%. Not sure of the make of car, but this sounded like a generic outcome of what the ceramic can deliver. It may just be marketing and tv, but it sounds reasonable.
Scott Huff

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brucejon Avatar
brucejon Bruce Jones
Santa Cruz, CA, USA   USA
1962 Triumph TR3B
1963 Triumph TR3B "Tupperware TR3"
1969 Triumph Spitfire MkIII
1972 Triumph TR6
claytoncnc Avatar
claytoncnc Gold Member Marcus Clayton
Melbourne, Ivanhoe, Australia   AUS
Only car I have coated the headers was a Cosworth Mercedes

The factory headers are stainless, and they cracked.

Repaired and ceramic coated with Jet Hot, as much for aesthetics as anything.
Had the car another 10 years and was still good, but did not make any measurements, but the headers did not crack again, and it is a known issue.

smartin108 Avatar
smartin108 Silver Member Steve Martin
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA   USA
I had a serious heat problem with vapor lock and boil over when I bought my Spitfire last spring. It had a Mikuni with uncoated headers. I had the headers ceramic coated inside and outside and added an insulated wrap to fuel line from the pump to the carb. Result is ZERO problems now. Completely solved the issue.

bikeboy Avatar
bikeboy Silver Member Ian F
Lara, Victoria, Australia   AUS
Jet-Hot website says they will lower surrounding temperatures by as much as 65%
https://www.jet-hot.com/classic-polish

I had some Honda 4 pipes done in their version of black chrome. Still look good after 5 years.

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1490347 by HuffDaddy Garrett,
I recently saw a Velocity Channel episode of Wheeler Dealer and the ceramic coating should reduce heat in the engine well by roughly 20%. Not sure of the make of car, but this sounded like a generic outcome of what the ceramic can deliver. It may just be marketing and tv, but it sounds reasonable.
Scott Huff

Yeah, but 20% of what?
What are you considering to be 'zero'?
The absolute temperature?
Or the temperature above ambient?

bikeboy Avatar
bikeboy Silver Member Ian F
Lara, Victoria, Australia   AUS
In reply to # 1490375 by clshore

Yeah, but 20% of what?

Normal temperature of the engine bay I would have thought?

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1490378 by bikeboy
In reply to # 1490375 by clshore

Yeah, but 20% of what?

Normal temperature of the engine bay I would have thought?

From an engineering perspective the math does not make sense.
Again, what is 'zero'?

Assume peak temp is 600F
So 20% cooler would be 120F less, = 480F
But if peak temp is 800F, 20% cooler = 640F

Meanwhile, if ambient temp is 75F, peak is 600F, then the delta T is 525F, 20% cooler is 105F = 495F
If peak is 800F, then delta T is 725F, 20% cooler is 145F = 655F

Andy-Sherry Avatar
Andy-Sherry Gold Member Andy Martin
Portland, OR, USA   USA
I had my exhaust manifold and downpipe coated 2 coats outside and 1 inside
I have a reading of 430 written in my notebook I don’t remember doing this so may or not be relevant



Andy&Sherry
1974 Spit 1500 Carmine Red
1977 Spit 1500 Pink Panther Pink

Always learning something

Brad.Cogan Avatar
Brad.Cogan Bradley Cogan
RAF Cosford, Shropshire, UK   GBR
1977 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "Wray"
2007 Fiat Grande Punto "Pepper"
If you want to reduce the under bonnet temperatures you could just get louvres cut into the bonnet like a GT6. It would allow the hot high pressure air under the bonnet out and improve the airflow through the grill, radiator and engine bay.



Brad Cogan

1977 Triumph Spitfire 1500 'Wray'
2007 Fiat Grande Punto Active 1.2 'Pepper'

GarrettWendt Avatar
GarrettWendt Garrett Wendt
Pittsford, New York, USA   USA
In reply to a post by Bradley Cogan If you want to reduce the under bonnet temperatures you could just get louvres cut into the bonnet like a GT6. It would allow the hot high pressure air under the bonnet out and improve the airflow through the grill, radiator and engine bay.

I have considered that in the past...how does one, "get louvres cut"?

Who or where to you go for that? Is there a tool?

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1490465 by GarrettWendt
In reply to a post by Bradley Cogan If you want to reduce the under bonnet temperatures you could just get louvres cut into the bonnet like a GT6. It would allow the hot high pressure air under the bonnet out and improve the airflow through the grill, radiator and engine bay.

I have considered that in the past...how does one, "get louvres cut"?

Who or where to you go for that? Is there a tool?

Easy, all you need is a louver cutting machine ... winking smiley

Frankly, I'm not a big fan of the GT6 louvers.
On my GT6, and many others I've seen, the individual louver segments are easily bent, and when they do, the metal stretches, making it nearly
impossible to bend them back into perfectly parallel alignment, ie they look kind of crumby.
Also, they are stamped into compound curved surfaces, so alignment is always somewhat 'iffy'.

SpiTazz72 Avatar
SpiTazz72 Bryan H
Magnolia, Texas, USA   USA
If I get a set of stainless headers I may look into ceramic coatings. I'm guessing it's best to test fit them and make adjustments prior to applying the coating.

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