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Can't get my clutch to fully release... Pulled tranny, all parts look fine

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1488288 by maueman Don't give up on bleeding the clutch system. My story SHORT I replaced the flywheel with light weight aluminum one, new clutch and plate. Bleed the system. Went for a short ride. Clutch started to disengage at a stop light. Got it home and. bleed it again. Same problem. Removed the tranny, clutch, flywheel found nothing wrong. Put it back in the car and bleed it again. same problem. WTH. Out comes the tranny ( passenger side) again. Install another new clutch assembly. Back into the car again, Same problem. Clutch would not disengage. Changed the slave cylinder and installed a slave pushrod with an adjustable one. Same problem. WTH. Got a vacuum bleeder and bleed the system again with all new fluid. NOT SILCONE OR DOT 5 that's was the 2 different fuids that I used. Went with Castrol dot 4 this time. Put 2 bottles through the system and low and behold everything worked perfect......Was it the fluid? Was it the way I was bleeding the system? Did an air bubble get trapped in the slave? I don't know. But 5 days wasted....Just don't give bleeding it again.

Silicone/DOT5 fluid is well known for holding trapped air bubbles in suspension for a long period of time.
Classical bleeding methods create lots and lots and lots of bubbles, but in conventional fluid they coalesce quickly.
It's also important to install the slave cylinder with the bleed nipple above the hydraulic line, rather than beneath it.
Because trapped air rises.

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scardini1 Avatar
scardini1 Gold Member Jim Moscardini
Great Mills, MD, USA   USA
1968 Triumph GT6 "Rocinante"
2003 Jaguar XKR "Kitty"
In reply to # 1488306 by clshore
In reply to # 1488288 by maueman Don't give up on bleeding the clutch system. My story SHORT I replaced the flywheel with light weight aluminum one, new clutch and plate. Bleed the system. Went for a short ride. Clutch started to disengage at a stop light. Got it home and. bleed it again. Same problem. Removed the tranny, clutch, flywheel found nothing wrong. Put it back in the car and bleed it again. same problem. WTH. Out comes the tranny ( passenger side) again. Install another new clutch assembly. Back into the car again, Same problem. Clutch would not disengage. Changed the slave cylinder and installed a slave pushrod with an adjustable one. Same problem. WTH. Got a vacuum bleeder and bleed the system again with all new fluid. NOT SILCONE OR DOT 5 that's was the 2 different fuids that I used. Went with Castrol dot 4 this time. Put 2 bottles through the system and low and behold everything worked perfect......Was it the fluid? Was it the way I was bleeding the system? Did an air bubble get trapped in the slave? I don't know. But 5 days wasted....Just don't give bleeding it again.

Silicone/DOT5 fluid is well known for holding trapped air bubbles in suspension for a long period of time.
Classical bleeding methods create lots and lots and lots of bubbles, but in conventional fluid they coalesce quickly.
It's also important to install the slave cylinder with the bleed nipple above the hydraulic line, rather than beneath it.
Because trapped air rises.

Agreed - It took a few rounds of bleeding to finally clear my DOT5 brake system. Bleed slowly. Don't pump the pedal. Bleed a little. Let it set. Bleed some more.

I'm not sure if anyone asked these, so I'll apologize in advance, but exactly "when" did this engagement problem begin? Was it before you did any clutch / transmission work, or was it after? Did the Master Cylinder reservoir ever go dry?

Whenever I have a problem "after" I've worked on something, my primary focus is only on those things I touched. I really try to avoid going loopy chasing smoke and exotic, low probability causes. Our clutch system really couldn't be any simpler. Problems are few. Fixes are usually simple as well. As a rookie problem solver there were times that I drove myself nuts and blew a lot of money only to find the fix was a few dollars and right under my nose. My problem solving today always includes the "What have I touched" mantra and "fix the cheapest thing first". In this case that would probably be rebuilding kits for the master and slave cylinders. Super cheap, and it will take the hydraulics off the possible cause list.

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1488332 by scardini1 Whenever I have a problem "after" I've worked on something, my primary focus is only on those things I touched. I really try to avoid going loopy chasing smoke and exotic, low probability causes. Our clutch system really couldn't be any simpler. Problems are few. Fixes are usually simple as well. As a rookie problem solver there were times that I drove myself nuts and blew a lot of money only to find the fix was a few dollars and right under my nose. My problem solving today always includes the "What have I touched" mantra and "fix the cheapest thing first". In this case that would probably be rebuilding kits for the master and slave cylinders. Super cheap, and it will take the hydraulics off the possible cause list.

Then you have people like me who tend to over-engineer things using the principle "If it broke - make it stronger" which leads to Tim Allen grunts.

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scardini1 Avatar
scardini1 Gold Member Jim Moscardini
Great Mills, MD, USA   USA
1968 Triumph GT6 "Rocinante"
2003 Jaguar XKR "Kitty"
I am truly subject to the same curse, Doug (Rocket Scientist that I am). Left unsupervised, I am all to capable of complicating a bowling ball. It took years to learn how to sit on my hands and "not" try to fix the airplane INFLIGHT! Or to not order an Electron Microscope to diagnose a leaking hose.

Sound familiar? - lol

eye rolling smiley

Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1488382 by scardini1 I am truly subject to the same curse, Doug (Rocket Scientist that I am). Left unsupervised, I am all to capable of complicating a bowling ball. It took years to learn how to sit on my hands and "not" try to fix the airplane INFLIGHT! Or to not order an Electron Microscope to diagnose a leaking hose.

Sound familiar? - lol

eye rolling smiley

Only if it ends in duct tape.

clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1488395 by Doug in Vegas
In reply to # 1488382 by scardini1 I am truly subject to the same curse, Doug (Rocket Scientist that I am). Left unsupervised, I am all to capable of complicating a bowling ball. It took years to learn how to sit on my hands and "not" try to fix the airplane INFLIGHT! Or to not order an Electron Microscope to diagnose a leaking hose.

Sound familiar? - lol

eye rolling smiley

Only if it ends in duct tape.

As long as it's electrophoretic morphing self wrapping duct tape having gecko inspired nano tendril adhesive.

scardini1 Avatar
scardini1 Gold Member Jim Moscardini
Great Mills, MD, USA   USA
1968 Triumph GT6 "Rocinante"
2003 Jaguar XKR "Kitty"
Oooooo, ...... Carter

YOU DA MAN!!!

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SpiTazz72 Avatar
SpiTazz72 Bryan H
Magnolia, Texas, USA   USA
In reply to # 1488306 by clshore
In reply to # 1488288 by maueman Don't give up on bleeding the clutch system. My story SHORT I replaced the flywheel with light weight aluminum one, new clutch and plate. Bleed the system. Went for a short ride. Clutch started to disengage at a stop light. Got it home and. bleed it again. Same problem. Removed the tranny, clutch, flywheel found nothing wrong. Put it back in the car and bleed it again. same problem. WTH. Out comes the tranny ( passenger side) again. Install another new clutch assembly. Back into the car again, Same problem. Clutch would not disengage. Changed the slave cylinder and installed a slave pushrod with an adjustable one. Same problem. WTH. Got a vacuum bleeder and bleed the system again with all new fluid. NOT SILCONE OR DOT 5 that's was the 2 different fuids that I used. Went with Castrol dot 4 this time. Put 2 bottles through the system and low and behold everything worked perfect......Was it the fluid? Was it the way I was bleeding the system? Did an air bubble get trapped in the slave? I don't know. But 5 days wasted....Just don't give bleeding it again.

Silicone/DOT5 fluid is well known for holding trapped air bubbles in suspension for a long period of time.
Classical bleeding methods create lots and lots and lots of bubbles, but in conventional fluid they coalesce quickly.
It's also important to install the slave cylinder with the bleed nipple above the hydraulic line, rather than beneath it.
Because trapped air rises.

Just following up with a pic of my slave cylinder which I successfully bled recently. I did not remove it but it looks like it can be rotated or the hydraulic line and bleeding nipple can be reversed. No dreaded clutch slave bubble.


Attachments:
72tr83.JPG    40.7 KB
72tr83.JPG

Original Owner Jerry Judge
Jupiter, Florida, USA   USA
Hey Alex:

I have a thought, The slave cylinder is attached to the bell housing using two bolts through two ears that are part of the bell housing. The slave cylinder should be attached below the ears. Possible you attached the slave cylinder above the ears?

Jerry

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