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Spitfire 1500 - operating temperature

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Brad.Cogan Avatar
Brad.Cogan Bradley Cogan
Coningsby, Lincolnshire, UK   GBR
My mind has just overheated haha.

I get what you mean. The fans aren't the only factor.

I think I should be okay. I'll just set it around 100°C and do a bit of trial and error to ensure my engine temp stays where it normally does on the gauge (right in the middle).



Brad Cogan

1977 Triumph Spitfire 1500 'Wray'
2007 Fiat Grande Punto Active 1.2 'Pepper'

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Doug in Vegas Avatar
Doug in Vegas Douglas D
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA   USA
In reply to # 1477723 by Brad.Cogan You guys are talking about the coolant thermostat right? The one that opens up the valve to allow coolant to the radiator? I meant a thermostat for electric fans. Interesting stuff though I didn't realise you could get different coolant thermostats.

Right. I got one of these:

http://www.autozone.com/cooling-heating-and-climate-control/cooling-fan-control/compressor-works-cooling-fan-control/267187_69565_0

lef2wander Avatar
lef2wander Gold Member James Thomas
hatfield, ma, USA   USA
It would seem reasonable to set it at the same temp as the activation of the thermo switch on the 79/80.
I tested mine a month ago. On the wife's stove, in her pot with her meat thermometer. 190°f.

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alanroseman Avatar
alanroseman Silver Member Alan Roseman
Rehoboth, MA, USA   USA
1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "The Little Car.."
In reply to # 1477291 by trrdster Alan, it was Spitbits I got it from, sorry to mislead you.

Here go"

http://www.spitbits.com/store/17d-TEMPERATURE-SENDER-ADAPTER-for-use-with-BHA4900-dual-gauge-P2162.aspx


They make them for several cars, so I'm thinking this is the Spitfire one. Might want to check with them.

Thanks Wayne.



Cheers, Alan

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Born Loser Avatar
Born Loser Silver Member Matthew Taylor
Land O Lake, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1477749 by lef2wander It would seem reasonable to set it at the same temp as the activation of the thermo switch on the 79/80.
I tested mine a month ago. On the wife's stove, in her pot with her meat thermometer. 190°f.

LOL, after a fairly long detour, we arrived back where I started! That was really my only point - about 190.



Matthew
1960 Triumph TR3a
1970 Triumph Spitfire MK 3
2012 Mini Cooper SS Convertible

krhodes1 Kevin Rhodes
Westbrook, ME, USA   USA
I have the slant radiator setup in my car as well. Had to replace the radiator this year, so replaced the thermoswitch as well. New one from Spitbits was marked "200F", which I assume is the operating temp. Gauge reads dead center as always with it.

Actually discovered this forum while searching for a solution to the not available from any of the regular vendors radiator. Got the aluminum 3-row from eBay, working great so far.

Kevin Rhodes
Westbrook ME, Pt Charlotte, FL
Freddie the mongrel Spitfire
Plus a Land Rover Disco I, a BMW wagon, a VW GTI, and a mangy old Saab 9-5



Kevin Rhodes
Westbrook ME, Pt Charlotte, FL
Freddie the mongrel Spitfire
Plus a Land Rover Disco I, a BMW, a VW, and a mangy old Saab 9-5

parto47 John Partington
Greenbank Brisbane, Queensland, Australia   AUS
Hi Brad
It seems that the subject of you asking about the correct temp setting for a 12v water pump has got a little off track and lost in the posts

When using a 12v water pump there is no need for a thermostat at all, as your setting for the pump to cut in and start working [which you dial in ]can be set at any temp that you want 80degree works great this is when the water will start to flow through the motor .12v pumps will start to work at 2 degrees over the set point and at that point you should have you electric fan cut in
When the temp cools to3 degrees below the set point your water pump will cut and sit until the temp rises to 2 degrees above the set point hence controlling the water temp within you set range

If you have to use a thermostat be sure to drill two holes in it for water to pass through as if it is shut off and water can not flow to the electric pump you will be able to kiss the pump good by

Parto 47

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grubscrew Avatar
grubscrew grub screw
The suburbs of, Winfield, Maryland, USA   USA
In reply to # 1478092 by parto47 Hi Brad
It seems that the subject of you asking about the correct temp setting for a 12v water pump ....

Brad asked that?



Dave
1970 Spitfire Mk3
FDU 78359L
34/11 (Jasmine yellow/Black interior)

1962 Triumph TR3B
TCF 575L
Signal Red/Red interior

Brad.Cogan Avatar
Brad.Cogan Bradley Cogan
Coningsby, Lincolnshire, UK   GBR
Yeah this thread has gone way off haha. I was actually asking about what temperature to set electric fans to come on at. It seems to be around 100°C from what people are saying. smiling smiley



Brad Cogan

1977 Triumph Spitfire 1500 'Wray'
2007 Fiat Grande Punto Active 1.2 'Pepper'



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-08-14 08:02 AM by Brad.Cogan.

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clshore Carter Shore
Beverly Hills, Florida, USA   USA
In reply to # 1477818 by Born Loser
In reply to # 1477749 by lef2wander It would seem reasonable to set it at the same temp as the activation of the thermo switch on the 79/80.
I tested mine a month ago. On the wife's stove, in her pot with her meat thermometer. 190°f.

LOL, after a fairly long detour, we arrived back where I started! That was really my only point - about 190.

Oh come on, that NEVER happens on this site winking smiley

racer490 Jerry Bryant
Palm Harbor, USA   USA
Unfortunately some of the best info gets posted off topic. When you do a search it is hard to find again.

alanroseman Avatar
alanroseman Silver Member Alan Roseman
Rehoboth, MA, USA   USA
1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 "The Little Car.."
In reply to # 1478195 by racer490 Unfortunately some of the best info gets posted off topic. When you do a search it is hard to find again.

Jerry,

That is a keen observation. Currently the thread of "what did you do to your xxx" is eating every topic. It is quite obviously very very popular, but it has reduced the topic list on a daily basis, and turned it into one run-on ginormous thread. In the long run it'll make it more difficult do do a precise search. Agreed.

Alan



Cheers, Alan

Check on the photos every now and then... all free for download, in all sizes.

The British Motorcar Festival Bristol RI:

Photographs - For your computer

A BMCNE Cruise:

Portsmouth & Aquidnik Island, RI

poulsbobill Bill K
Poulsbo, Washington, USA   USA
The thermostat on my fan is 92/87 centigrade 198 /188 Fahrenheit. Which i believe is the stock setting. I have no overheating problems

Bill



1980 Spitfire

hearditallbefore Avatar
Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK   GBR
In reply to # 1477289 by clshore
In reply to # 1477283 by Brad.Cogan I'm going to be upgrading to an electric fan but I don't know what the best operating temperature is for our cars in order to set the thermostat.

My needle sits directly in the centre on the temperature gauge but I don't know what this equates to since there are no units or if it is even the best temperature.

An electric fan is a good upgrade, but a couple of points:

The fan is there to create airflow through the radiator when the car is idling or traveling slowly.
At speeds more than about 10-15 MPH, the fan is redundant.

Your engine is engineered to operate correctly at temperatures well in excess of 100 C.
The hotter the coolant, the more efficiently the motor and cooling system operates.
That is why it features a pressure cap, as higher system pressure yields a higher boiling point.
Unless your coolant is boiling out the overflow, you are NOT overheating, it is working as designed.

The stock temperature gage is marked C and H, basically it is a mechanical idiot light.
Even if you take the time to calibrate the marks, accuracy and precision are likely no better than 20%.

Setting the operating temperature too cool degrades engine performance and increases engine wear.
The oil is also designed to operate above 85 C.


I've always regarded an oil temperature gauge as much more useful than a water temperature gauge.
I've also always upgraded my water gauges to the calibrated smiths ones from the 'you're cold, you've boiled over' ones.

Water just under 100, oil just over 100, harmony.



Swatting the yellow jackets away from the Triumph apple of truth…

hearditallbefore Avatar
Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK   GBR
In reply to # 1478199 by alanroseman
In reply to # 1478195 by racer490 Unfortunately some of the best info gets posted off topic. When you do a search it is hard to find again.

Jerry,

That is a keen observation. Currently the thread of "what did you do to your xxx" is eating every topic. It is quite obviously very very popular, but it has reduced the topic list on a daily basis, and turned it into one run-on ginormous thread. In the long run it'll make it more difficult do do a precise search. Agreed.

Alan



Time lock Ky to lock and sticky that thread and start a new one?



Swatting the yellow jackets away from the Triumph apple of truth…

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